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OHIO IN THE WAR: 



HER STATESMEN, 



HER 



GENERALS, AND SOLDIERS 



BY WIIITELAW REID, 



IIsT TWO 



VOL UME II: 
THE HISTORY OF HER REGIMENTS, 

AND 

OTHER MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS, 



" The real heroes of this war !),re the great brave, patient, nameless PEOPLK." GUKOWSKI. 



PUBLISHERS: 

MOORE, WILSTACH & BALDWIN, 

25 WEST FOURTH STREET, CINCINNATI. 

NEW YORK : GO WALKER STREET. 

18G8. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by 

MOORE, WILSTACII & BALDWIN, 
In the Clerk s Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of Ohio 



CONTENTS. 



PAH. 

INTRODUCTORY 3 

TABLE SHOWING LEADING FACTS IN THE HISTORY OF EACH ORGANIZATION 7 

INFANTRY REGIMENTS 15 744 

CAVALRY REGIMENTS 745 827 

INDEPENDENT BATTERIES 828 888 

FIRST LIGHT ARTILLERY 889 906 

FIRST AND SECOND HEAVY ARTILLERY 907 915 

IRREGULAR AND ANOMALOUS ORGANIZATIONS : 

One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Ohio, or 5th (Colored) U. S. Infantry 915 

Fourth Virginia Volunteer Infantry 918 

Independent Companies of Sharp-Shooters 921 

Union Light Guard, Fremont Body-Guard 923 924 

McLaughlin s Squadron of Cavalry, Harlan s Light Cavalry 925 927 

First, Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Independent Cavalry Companies 928 933 

Sherman s Body-Guard, Dennison Guards, Trumbull Guards 934 936 

Departmental Corps, Captain Bard s Company, Wallace Guards 936 937 

Second and Fourth Ohio Independent Battalions 938939 

Second and Eighth Ohio Batteries (N. G.) 939940 

INDEX 941 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



FRONTISPIECE STORMING OF FORT MCALLISTER BY HAZEN S COMMAND. 

PAGE. 

CAMP HARRISON, April, 1861 42 

LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN , 52 

THE TENNESSEE AT CHATTANOOGA 112 

GRAVES OF OHIO SOLDIERS LIBBY PRISON 176 

STEAMBOAT SCENE ON THE MISSISSIPPI 253 

BAGGAGE TRAIN ASCENDING THE ALLEGHANIES 292 

BRIDGE AT BRIDGEPORT, ALABAMA 355 

SHERMAN AT THE SEA 424 

MORGAN RAIDERS IN OHIO 488 

SALISBURY PRISONS 547 

CAVALRY CHARGE 783 

M189338 



ZP.A.IR/T 1 III. 

THE HISTORY OF OHIO REGIMENTS, 

AND 

OTHER MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS. 



INTRODUCTORY. 



THE REGIMENTS AND SOLDIERS OF OHIO. 



AT the close of the War against the Rebellion, the State of Ohio had in 
the National service two hundred regiments of all arms.* In the 
course of the war she furnished two hundred and thirty regiments, 
besides twenty-six independent batteries of artillery, five independent companies 
of cavalry, several companies of sharp-shooters, large parts of five regiments 
credited to the West Virginia contingent, two credited to the Kentucky con 
tingent, two transferred to " United States Colored Troops," and a large pro 
portion of the rank and file for the Fifty-Fourth and Fifty-Fifth Massachusetts. 
Of these organizations, twenty-three were infantry regiments furnished for 
three months at the outbreak of the war, being an excess of nearly one-half 
over the quota allotted to the State. f One hundred and ninety-one were infan 
try regiments afterward furnished in obedience to the several calls of the Pres 
ident one hundred and seventeen for three years, twenty-seven for one year, 
two for six months, three for three months, and forty-two for a hundred da3*s. 
Thirteen were cavalry and three were artillery regiments for three years. And 
of these three-years troops from Ohio, over twenty thousand re-enlisted as vet 
erans at the end of their long term of service to fight till the war should ebb 
out in Victory. 

In these various organizations, as original members or as recruits, the 
State furnished to the National service the magnificent arm} of three hundred 
and ten thousand six hundred and fifty-four soldiers. J The older, larger, and 

*Kep. Adj. Gen. of Ohio for 18(55, p. 67. 

t The quota was only thirteen regiments. The Government would not then accept more, and 
so the State put them in the field on her own account. The Government finally paid them. 

t In this statement I follow throughout the figures of the United States Provost-Marshal- 
General in his final report to the War Department (Vol. I, pp. 1GO to 1C4). Nearly all the States 
have industriously reckoned up larger totals obtained by counting those who paid commutation 
money as so many soldiers actually furnished, by treating the veteran re-enlistments as so many 
new troops, by enumerating their citizens enlisted in the organizations of other States, their 
sailors, etc. Much may be plausibly said in favor of counting most of these di fie rent classes; 
but, on the whole, it seems to me fairer to reject them, and to accept the figures on which the 
War Department acted in apportioning the quotas and enforcing the draft. This gives a less 
imposing appearance to the statement of our troops, but it is perfectly free from any possibility 
of being charged with the unwise exaggeration to which a morbid State pride has sometimes 
led. The Adjutant-General of Ohio, however, in his report for 1864, reckoning most of the 
classes we have rejected, had swelled the number of troops furnished by the State (up to Decem 
ber 1, 1864) to 346,326. Report, p. 47. 



4 OITTO IN THE WAR. 

more populous commonwealth of Pennsylvania gave not quite twenty-eight 
thousand more, while Illinois fell fort}--eight thousand behind, Indiana a hun 
dred and sixteen thousand, Kentucky two hundred and thirty-five thousand, 
and Massachusetts a hundred and sixty-four thousand. Thus Ohio more than 
maintained in the army the rank among her sisters to which her population 
pointed. Let us not fail to add in no spirit of detraction to other States, but 
with the honest pride which the facts entitle us to entertain that Ohio fur 
nished, from first to last, more troops than the Government ever required of 
her; that, at the end of the war, with a thousand men in the camps of the 
State that were never mustered, she still had a credit on the roils of the War 
Department for four thousand three hundred and thirty-two soldiers beyond 
the aggregate of all quotas ever assigned her;* and that, besides all these, six 
thousand four hundre.d and seventy-nine of her citizens had paid the commuta 
tion in lieu of personal service; while Indiana was behind her quotas five 
thousand four hundred and twenty-five men, Kentucky twenty-four thousand 
nine hundred and nineteen, Pennsylvania fifty-thousand three hundred and 
sixty, and ]SI"cw York sixty-one thousand one hundred and eighty-nine. f 
So nobly through all those years of trial and death did she keep the promise of 
the memorable dispatch from her first war Governor: "If Kentucky refuses to 
fill her quota, Ohio will fill it for her." 

The great army thus put into the field by the State that, half a century 
ago. was a wilderness, was enlisted, under the different calls of the President, 
as follows : 

Under the call of Ohio furnished Her quota being 

April 15, 1SC1, for 75,000 men 12,357 10,153{ 

July 22, 1861, for 500,000 men 84,116 67,365 

July 2, 1862, for 300,000 men 58,325 36,858 

August 4, 1862, for 300,000 for nine months 36,858 

June 15, 1863, for militia 2,736 

October 17, 1863, for 500,000 32,837 51,465 

March 14, 1864, for 200,000 men 29,931 20,595 

April 22, 1864, for one-hundred days militia 36,254 30,000 

July 18, 1864, for 500,000 men 30,823 27,001 

December 19, 1864, for 300,000 men 23,275 26,027 

Totals..... 310,654 306,322 

The period of service of these troops ranged from that of the National 
Guards for a hundred days to that of the veteran volunteers for five years. 

* Furthermore, she was to have been credited on the next call, had another been needed, 
with thirteen thousand and twenty-two years of service not hitherto credited to her on any of 
her quotas for no reason, save that it had been voluntarily offered when the Government had 
not been calling for it. Provost-Marshal-GeneraP.s Report, Vol. I, p. 164. 

tThe States of Illinois and Massachusetts, which, having been included in the previous 
comparison, ought to appear in this one, had also more than filled their quotas, and had hand 
some credits. 

t No credit was here given, it will be seen, for the extra ten regiments raised for the three- 
months service in April and May, 1861, which the Government refused to accept. 



INTRODUCTORY. 5 

Keduced to the department standard, they represent not qufte two hundred and 
forty thousand three-years soldiers. 

Even this does not present the full sum of the contributions of men from 
Ohio to the National armies. The State \vas credited with one thousand and 
seventy-six men furnished to the gun-boat service on the Western waters, and, 
before the department began to give credit for these naval enlistments, there 
had been two thousand three hundred and sixty-seven of them. Furthermore, 
there were five thousand and ninety-two negro soldiers from Ohio, cither cred 
ited to other States or to the "United States Colored Troops," besides some 
complete white regiments and large numbers of recruits raised in Ohio, but, in 
the varying exigencies of the department, credited elsewhere. 

Altogether, reckoning the sum of these various numbers, we may safely 
conclude that the army of the State, from the outbreak of the war to its close, 
swelled to the noble proportions of a third of a million of men. 

Of these, nearly all were volunteers. Only eight thousand seven hundred 
and fifty had to be raised in Ohio by the draft throughout the war. But the, 
volunteers received from the people of the State, independent of Government pay 
and premiums, over twenty-three and a half million dollars of local bounties. 

Their service was deadly. Eleven thousand two hundred and thirty- 
seven of them were killed or mortally wounded in action, of whom six thou 
sand five hundred and sixty-three were left dead on the, field of battle. Thir 
teen thousand three hundred and fifty-four died, before the expiration of their 
terms of enlistment, of diseases contracted in the service. Thirty-seven Ohio 
soldiers out of every thousand fell dead or mortally wounded in battle; forty- 
seven more died in the hospitals ; seventy-one more were honorably discharged, 
unable longer to do the duty of soldiers, by reason of wounds or sickness 
incurred in the Country s service. Let us not, in the fullness of our just 
pride, conceal the darker side of the picture: forty-four out of every thou 
sand deserted.* 

They fought on well-nigh every battle-field of the war. Within forty- 
eight hours after the telegraphic call, two Ohio regiments were on their way to 
the rescue of the imperiled capital in the spring of 1801. An Ohio brigade, in 
good order, covered the retreat from the first Bull Ilun Ohio troops formed 

* It should be remembered that many of these desertions were not "such in intention, and 
that, after a stolen visit to their families, the men went back to (lie service. The number of 
desertions in Ohio troops, however, was small compared with that in the troops in many States. 
We have said that in Ohio it was 44 to the thousand. In New York it was 89 to the thousand, 
in Pennsylvania 58, in New Jersey 107, in New Hampshire 112, in Connecticut 117, in Kansas 
117, in Kentucky 87, in Indiana 37. and in Illinois 51. 

The battle mortality compares as follows in some of the Slates: 

In Ohio 37 to the thousand, in Indiana 30, in Illinois 35, in Kentucky 25, in New York 30, 
in Pennsylvania 31, in Massachusetts 47. These figures show what troops got into the places 
in battle where they lost the most. 

The mortality from disease, in the troops from the same States, compares as follows: 

In Ohio 47 to the thousand, in Indiana <>(), in Illinois 78, in New York 43, in Pennsylvania 
34, and in Massachusetts G3. Supposing exposure to be equal, these figures would show which 
States had a population possessing the highest vitality, and therefore the lowest mortality. 



6 OHIO IN THE WAE. 

the bulk of the army that saved West Virginia; the bulk of the army that 
saved Kentucky ; a large share of the army that took Fort Donelson ; a part 
of the army at Island No. 10; a great part of the army that, from Stone Eiver, 
and Chickamauga, and Mission Ridge, and Kenesaw, and Atlanta, swept down 
to the sea and back through the Carol inas to the Old Dominion. They fought 
at Pea Ridge. They charged at Wagner. They campaigned against the In 
dians along the base of the Rocky Mountains. They helped to redeem North 
Carolina. They were in the siege of Yicksburg, the siege of Charleston, the 
siege of Richmond, the siege of Mobile. At Pittsburg Landing, at Antietam, 
at Gettysburg, at Corinth, in the Wilderness, before Nashville, at Five Forks, 
and Appomattox C. II., their bones, reposing on the fields they won, are a per 
petually-binding pledge that no flag shall ever wave over these graves of our 
soldiers but the flag they fought to maintain. 

" The real heroes of this war are the great, brave, patient, nameless PEO 
PLE." It is to their service through these varied scenes that we now gladly 
*turn. The Victory was not won through Generalship it is a libel on the word 
to say that Generalship delayed for four years the success of twenty-five mill 
ions over ten millions, or required a million men in the closing campaigns to 
defeat a hundred thousand it was won by the sacrifices, the heroism, the suf 
ferings, the death of the men in the ranks. Their story we now seek to tell. 
It will be less picturesque, less attractive, fuller of dry details, fruitless fighting, 
tedious marches, labor, and waiting, and weariness. Even such was the life 
they led for us; and its record, we are firmly persuaded, will never cease to be 
cherished by their grateful countrymen. 



As it is possible that this second volume of Ohio in the War may fall into the hands of some 
who may not have access to Vol. I, the following explanations are here reproduced from the 
Preface to the work : ^ 

(1.) At the beginning of Vol. II is presented a table, showing at a glance the leading facts 
concerning the formation, service, losses, recruits, commanders, and muster-out of all the im 
portant volunteer organizations of the State. 

(2.) Preiixtd to the sketch of the history of each regiment, battery, or company, is an ex 
haustive Roster of its officers, from which the main facts in their military career may be traced. 
The basis of these Rosters is the record on tiie rolls o.f the State Adjutant-General at Columbus?, 
and the Volunteer Register lor Ohio, in the War Department at Washington. Both these are 
necessarily more or less inaccurate. Every effort has been made to correct them, and great num 
bers of changes have been made. We scarcely dare to hope that the Rosters, as here presented, 
are entirely free from errors; but we know them to be incomparably better than any others now 
in existence. 

(3.) Aside from the information given in the Rosters, Vol. II is devoted to the Men in the 
Banks. Special mention is not therefore habitually made, even of the commanders of regi 
ments. Concerning very many of them, however, full information may be found in the Lives 
of the Generals in Vol. I; where also the reader must look for the* History of the State during 
the War, and for many incidents illustrative of the heroism of private soldiers. 



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OHIO IN THE WAR. 



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FIEST OHIO INFANTRY. 



13 



1st REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 























Colom-1 
Lt. Colonel.... 
M tjor 


ALEX. M. McCOOK 
EDW.IN A. PAKKOTT 


April 17, 1S.U 
1 " 


April 17, ISO I 




burgeon 


WM. L. McMiu,i:N 
\Li!KiiT Wu SON 


: i; :; 


:; | ( 5 : :; 






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1 i " 


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1)0 


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Do 


Walter I? Pease 


i " 


* I? " 




Do 


T S Paddock 




< J- .. 




Do 


John Kftll 




17, " 




Do 

Do 


J. 0. Hamlet t 

Win "Hclj in" hliii 


" ; ;: 


|| 17! | 





Do 


J P Brucfe ." 


44 | 14 


44 jy 4 


\ 


Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 


Jeremiah Ens\vorth 
George D. Meivinnev 
T M Hunter 


July , || 
\pril I " 


July 8, 

8, 
\pril 17 




Do 


L Ktihlnian 








Do 


J. Winder 


" J , " 


17 




Do. 

Do. 


P. O WonneH 
J. Ellsworth 


|| 1 , || 


17, 
17, 




Do. 


W. H. Ravner 




17, " 


Resigned July 12, 1861. 


Do. 


J. 11. Eekert 
A. McKlvain 


44 , 44 


4 ,y 44 




Do. 
Do. 


M. Klein 
.). E. Haiupson 


1 , " 
,4 I , " 


17, " 
17, " 




M Li.-uten.ant 
Do. 


E. Rickets 
.1. Hand 


1 , " 
" J " 


" 17, " 

44 ,- 44 




Do. 
Do. 


Win. \V. \\ "oodw.trd 
J. Fitch 


" ] , " 

44 J 41 


17, " 

44 ]- 44 




Do. 


J. M. Richards 


44 J .4 






Do. 
Do. 


0. C. Maxwell 
A. Kinnev 


1 , " 


l< 17, 4i 




Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 


F. Fracker 
T. E. Douglass 
I. Bruck... 
J. M. Frazer 


1 , " 
1 , " 

1 , " 


ll] " 

17, " 















ROSTER, THHEE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 




UEXAKKS. 




Colonel 
Do. ..._ 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Maior 
Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 

Do" 
Chaplain 
Captain 
Do 


IJEXJ. F. SMITH 
EDWIN A. PAIIROTT 
EOUIN A. PAKROTT 
E. BAKSKTT LA NO DON 
K. BASSETT LANUIXJN 
JOAU A. STAFKOUI> 
ROIIKKT FLETCHER 
J, CULLF.N BAKU 
A. WILSON- 
J. CULL EN BAKU 


Oct. 

Feb. 

Feb." 

A ug. 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Aug. 

April 
Oct. 
Aug. 


12 sr>i 
t S02 
17, N ,l 
4, .St i2 
K, S(il 
4, Si;2 
21, SOI 

27^ si;i 

ll , ISIil 
1, " 


Oct. 

Feb. 
Jan. 

Fell. 

Aug. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Aug. 
April 


1, 
16, 
4, 


11, 

it s 

1 K 


1 SC ! 

1 - 1 \ 

1 - . 

ISti-l 


Cnl. to J c 2, ( .2; rep. for dutv as ( apt- in R.A. 
Honorably discharged February 15, IS U. 
Promoted to Colonel. [regiment. 
Wounded at Mission Ridge; must d out with 
Prt noted February 4, lsC,2. 
Mu t-redout with . r >th comp y August 17, 1S64. 
Pr. noted t.v President November W, lx,3. 
Mn tered out September, 1S<;4. 
Pro noted to Surgeon; assigned to 113th O.V.I. 
Pr< noted to Surgeon. 
Mustered out September, 1S4>4. 
Resigned October, ISdl. 
Promoted. 


A. J. BUOCKETT 
GEORGE 11. FULLRRTON 
Joab A. Station! 


Do 
Io 


Louis Jtuhlinaii 
Gates P. Thruston 
James B. Hampton 


17, " 
17, " 
17, " 


" 14, " 
" It, " 
14, " 


.Mustered out 
Res gned Mm 
Mustered out 


at expiration of service, 
ch 2:>, is..:), 
for promotion December 10 


, 63. 

62. 


DO! !!"."" 

Do. 
Do 
Do 
IK 
Do 
1st Lieu tern nt 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Nicholas Tnipp 
Patrick () Council 
Thomas J. Lawton 
Benjamin F. Prentiss 
Enianuel T. Hooker 
George L. II ay ward 


Oct. 

Feb. 

Dec. 

March 

May 

July 

A in, . 


17 " 

28, 1S02 
10, " 

.,., 41 


Feb. 

Dec. 

April 
March 
May 

July 
. an. 


i I. 
1 1. 
) I, 
i 1, 

2;t, 

\f.\ 
iti, 


II 

18(4 


Muster.-d out lsV,4. 
Mustered out. 
Uesitzned May 1.1, !S(i2. 
Resigned Mav 17, tsiVI. 
Mustered ( ut in lsr,4. 
Mustejwl ( ut in isiviJ for promotion. 
Muster. d < uf in Is .l. 
Mustered ( ut in lsr.4. 
Mustered ( ut in |sU. 
Mustered cut in lVl. 

Mustered <llt ill 1NV4. 
PK moled February 2S 18T.2. 
Resigned Max 22, 02; discharged June 21, 
Promoted to Captain. 
Proiioted to Captain. 


Jiunes E. Jones 
William L. Patter-on 
Samuel W. Davies 
Scdomon Iloman 
Enianuel T. Hooker 
Silas R Kwiii" 


s ism 


Ileurv Dorabnsch 



14 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



DATE OF RANK 



COM. ISSVED. 



KKMARKS. 



Ibt Lieutenant 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

fe 
K 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Jd Lieutenan 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



8S: 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



John Allen Campbell 

James Hill 

James W. Powell 

S. Barnett Paddock 

James K. Jones 

(Jeorge L. Hay-ward 

Win. A. Owesney 

John Parrot t 

James 31. Wyley 

Wm. M. Carpenter 

Alexander Johnson 

Samuel W. Davies 

Dennis Regan 

Anton Kuhlman 

George P. Leouhard 

Alexander Varian, jr 

orffe Grove 

Thomas W. Boyer 

R. B. Chappell 

John W. Jackson 

Edward J. Collins 

Uharles N. Winner 

^olomon Ho man 

Jeorge Grove 

Sylvanus Diekson 

Dennis Denny 

J. S. Ward 

2. Hallenburg 

\ntoii Kuhlman 

Francis M. Wareham 

ph Morrow 

es M. Wyley 

rank Smith..... 
Vnton Kuhlmai 

lamuel W. Davies 

Vm. 31. Carpenter 

)ennis Regan 

ohn J. Patton 

David E. Roatch 

lexander Johnson 

H. Prentiss 

Jeorge P. Leonhard 

Alexander Varian, jr 

leorge Grove 

)ennis Denny 

ohn W. Jackson 

tobert B. Chappell 

homas W. Boyer 

. S. Dixon .". 

*o loin on 1 Ionian 

, McCracken 

Villiard C. Prentiss , 

Jharles Young 

)aniel J. Deardorff. 

hristopher Wollenhaupt. 

). S. Ward 

J. Hallenburg 

In ton Kuhlman 

L homas II. Teatt. 



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. Aug. 

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Dec. 



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July 



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Res. Dec. 21. 62 ; promoted by Pres.Oct. 27, 62. 

Resigned October 17, 1863. 

Resigned June ly, 1S62. 

Resigned December 15, 1S62. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Resigned June 24, 1862. 

Resigned October IS, 1862. 

Resigned December 21, 1862. 

Resigned as 2d Lieutenant April 10, 1863. 

Resigned March 17, 1863. 

Promoted to Captain. 

3Iustered out, 1865. 

Resigned January 31, 1863. 

Mustered out. 

Killed. 

umission revoked. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted 

Killed September 19, 1363. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered ont. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed. 
Killed. 

Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 

Mustered out March 11, 1S65. 
Mustered out. 

Mustered out September 14, 1S65. 
Mustered out. 
romoted February 28, 1862. 
designed 3fay 26, 1862; discharged June 21, 62. 
Promoted October 27, 1862. 
Promoted October 18, 1862. 
"romoted 3Iay 2> >, 1^62: resigned April 10, 1863. 
romoted June 24, 18<~.2. 
designed June 16, 1862. 
tesigned May 28, 1862. 
Promoted June ID, 1862. 
designed November 2C>, }8f>2. 
romoted December 15, 1862. 
*romoted December 10, 1862. 
*romoted. 
romoted. 
romoted. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
lesigned July 28, 1864. 
tepigned June 10, 18i>3. 
lonorably discharged Jiine 14, 1S64. 
commission revoked, 
tilled at Mission Ridge, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
lustered out. 



FIRST OHIO INFANTRY. 15 



FIRST OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 



TIIIE FIRST OHIO was organized under President Lincoln s first call for troops in 
April, 1861. Its nucleus was found in some of the old militia companies, and its ranks 
were largely filled by young men of the best social and pecuniary advantages from 
South- Western Ohio. So prompt was its response to the cry of danger from the Capital, that 
within sixty hours after the telegraph brought the President s call, the cars were bearing the reg 
iment to Washington. It met, however, with vexatious delays on the route, and did not arrive 
on the Potomac till the danger was averted. Its earliest action was that at Vienna, whither Gen 
eral Schenck s brigade, to which it was attached, in careful obedience to General Scott s orders, 
and with his approval, was moving by rail. The Rebels were found much sooner than General 
Scott had expected. They fired into the train; but the First, followed by the rest of the brigade, 
hastily debarked, formed on the side of the track, and made so handsome a resistance, that they 
were presently able to retire unmolested, and with comparatively small loss. In the battle of Bull 
Run the First had little active share, but it and the rest of the brigade were kept in excellent order 
through all the disaster, and they rendered incalculable service in covering the retreat. Its losses 
were slight. The term of service of the regiment having now expired, it was sent home and 
mustered out. 

In August, 1861, the regiment began to be reorganized for three years service, but the reor 
ganization was not completed until October. Its place of rendezvous was at Camp Corwm, near 
Dayton. October 31st it left Dayton and reached Cincinnati ; November 4th received its arms, 
and on the 5th left on the steamer Telegraph No. 3 for Louisville. Arriving at midnight, it Avent 
into Camp York, near that city. On the 8th of November, at half past one P. M., it embarked 
for West Point, at the mouth of Salt River. On the 15th of November the regiment marched 
via Elizabethtown, reaching Camp Nevin on the 16th, where it reported to General A. M. Mo 
Cook, then in command of the Second Division of the Army of the Cumberland. Soon after it 
was brigaded with the First Kentucky or Louisville Legion, Sixth Indiana, First Battalion Fif 
teenth United States Infantry, and battalions of the Sixteenth and Nineteenth Infantry, forming 
the Fourth Brigade of the Second Division. On December 19th the regiment marched to Bacon 
Creek, and on the 17th to Green River. During the last four miles the march was made under 
the inspiration of music from Willich s guns at Munfordsville. As the regiment inarched into 
camp that evening the dead and wounded of the Thirty-Second Indiana were being brought in 
from the field. It remained in camp, at Green River, from December 17th until February 14, 
1862, during which time it was thoroughly drilled and prepared for the field. On the morning 
of the 14ih orders were received for the troops to march to West Point, Kentucky, there to take 
steamers and join the forces under General Grant, then moving on Fort Henry. Reaching Upton 
Station, the regiment bivouacked in the snow until the morning of the 16th, when news was re 
ceived of the fall of Fort Henry. This intelligence caused a retrograde movement to Green 
River. On February 17th the regiment began its march to Nashville; arriving March 3d, it went 
into camp late at night five miles out on the Franklin Turnpike. This march at night will long 
be remembered, for it was pitch dark, and rain, snow, and sleet were falling thick and fast. The 
men had neither tents, blankets, nor shelter of any kind, and, encamping in an open field on the 
icy ground, they suffered terribly. On the 16th of March the regiment marched with its division 
to Duck River, opposite Columbia, reaching there on the 21st. Awaiting the completion of a 
bridge over Duck River, it went intp camp. It crossed Duck River March 31st, and moved 
toward Savannah. 

At half past nine A. M., April 6th, heavy cannonading was heard in the direction of Shiloh, 
which caused a double-quick movement forward. The troops marched thirteen miles from half 



16 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

past one to half past four P. M., and arrived at Savannah at half past seven P. M., and at Pitts- 
burg Landing at daylight the next morning. 

At six A. M., the regiment moved to the front and formed in line of battle, occupying 
a position on the left of its brigade and to the right of General Crittenden s division. After 
fighting until about noon, charging and driving the enemy steadily, and recapturing General 
Sherman s head-quarters camp, the regiment retired to replenish its ammunition boxes, leaving 
a part of the Fifth Brigade as its relief. Ammunition being procured, the First returned to the 
field and participated in the general charge on the enemy s lines. 

Colonel Gibson s brigade being menaced by the enemy on its left flank, the First Ohio and 
Nineteenth Regulars went to its relief, arriving just in time to repulse a vigorous attack from the 
Rebels. This closed the terrible battle. The First Ohio was commanded by Colonel B. F. 
Smith, a regular army officer, whose soldierly qualities and experience undoubtedly saved the 
regiment from great loss. Other regiments occupying the same position suffered terribly. Cap 
tains Hooker and Kuhlman were severely wounded. Its loss in this battle was sixty men and 
officers killed and wounded. It was ordered back to the Landing, where it bivouacked that night 
in the rain and mud. 

The regiment participated in the tedious movement on Corinth, having occasional skirmishes. 
On the 27th of May six companies of the regiment, under Major Bassett Langdon, had a brisk 
fight at Bridge Creek. The enemy s pickets were driven in, and the ground held. On the 30th 
of May Corinth was entered by the National forces. 

The First did not participate in the pursuit of the enemy, but remained in and about Corinth, 
doing picket and guard duty, until the 10th of June, when it received marching orders and 
started lor Nashville, passing through luka, Tuscumbia, Florence, and Huntsville. At Hunts- 
ville the cars were taken, and the regiment reached Boiling Fork, a tributary of the Elk River, 
on the 7th of July. 

On the 14th of July the regiment went by rail to Tullahoma to repel an anticipated attack 
on that point. It returned to Cowan s Station on the 18th. On the 10th of August General J. 
W. Sill took command of the brigade, and on the 24th the regiment, with its brigade and divis 
ion, marched for Pelham, where it joined the forces under General A. M. McCook. On the 
28th of August the regiment marched to Altamont, on the Cumberland Mountains, and on the 
29th and 30th reconnoissances were made down the main road toward Sequatchie Valley. Oil 
the afternoon of the 30th it marched toward Nashville, passing through Manchester, Murfrees- 
boro , and Lavergne, arriving in the vicinity of Nashville on the 7th of September. 

The march was resumed September 10th at seven P. M., passing through Nashville and 
across the Cumberland River at three o clock the next morning. 

The regiment had now fairly commenced its march, in company with General Buell s army, 
in pursuit of Bragg s Rebel army, then on its way to Louisville. The race was won by the 
National forces, and Louisville reached September 26th. It is needless to describe the arduous 
march or the sufferings of the men on this memorable occasion. The extremely hot weather, 
the dusty roads, and the almost total absence of drinking water, either for the men or animals, 
occasioned the most intense suffering and the loss of many valuable lives. 

But little rest was allowed at Louisville. October 1st the march was resumed, the First, with 
its brigade, moving out on the Frankfort Turnpike. Shelby ville was reached on the 2d, and Frank 
fort October 6th. This column of National troops was under the command of General J. W. Sill. 
On the 9th, at Dog- Walk, a brisk fight was had with the enemy, in which the First Ohio 
took a prominent part, with the loss of eight or ten men. Lieutenant Anton Kuhlman was 
wounded severely. The march was very arduous, and at times perilous, as it was in the power 
of the Rebel army to mass and overwhelm the National forces. During most of the time the 
enemy hung on the flanks of the National forces, and annoyed them in every possible way. 

A junction with the main army under General Buell was effected on the llth of October, 
two days after the battle of Perry ville, and the First went into camp on the battle-field. 



FIRST OHIO INFANTRY. 17 

On October 13th the regiment took up the line of march and readied Danville on the 14th 
and passing through, continued on to Crab Orchard, where it went into camp for four days on 
Logan s Creek, near Hall s Gap. This completed the pursuit of Bragg s forces, and the National 
army, after a few days rest, turned the head of its column toward Nashville, whence it had 
started. This place was reached November 16th. The First passed on and went into camp nine 
miles out on the Murfreesboro Turnpike, near the State Insane Asylum. In this little march 
some skirmishing was had with the Rebel cavalry, then in considerable force on all the roads in 
the vicinity of Nashville. 

On the retrograde march through Kentucky General Buell, commanding the Army of the 
Ohio, had been superseded by General William S. Rosecrans. General Rosecrans immediately 
reorganized the whole army; a new name was given to- it Army of the Cumberland and a 
general change in its structure was made. General J. W. Sill, commanding the division in 
which the First was brigaded, was superseded by General R. W. Johnson. The name of the 
corps and division was changed to the Fourteenth Army Corps, Second Division, right wing of 
Army of the Cumberland. 

On December 26, 1862, General Rosecrans having completed his arrangements, the move 
ment on Bragg s army at Murfreesboro commenced. The First Ohio moved out on the Nolins- 
ville Turnpike with the right wing, about noon of the 26th, in the midst of a drenching rain 
storm, and reached Nolin Creek at four o clock P. M. During this march almost constant 
skirmishing was had with Hardee s Rebel corps. This continued to the vicinity of Murfrees 
boro , which was reached on the 30th, in the midst of the still driving and drenching rain. 

On December 31st the Battle of Stone River commenced. The First Ohio, at daylight, was 
stationed on the right, with R. W. Johnson s Second Division. The pickets were driven in at 
six o clock. The First was immediately formed in line of battle and stationed across an open 
field behind a fence, and formed the right of Johnson s front line. Within five minutes the 
enemy s skirmishers advanced, but were quickly repulsed. Following their skirmishers, the 
enemy advanced in force, but were promptly checked. This action lasted half an hour, when 
another heavy force made its appearance on the right and rear of the First, compelling the regi 
ment to fall back. In effecting this it encountered the Louisville Legion, which formed the 
second line, at a time when it was making a change of front to meet the onset on its flank. This 
created some confusion in both regiments. Order was partially restored, however, and the fight 
continued, but the entire National right wing was so hardly pressed that it was forced back on 
the center, creating for a time much confusion. After several ineffectual attempts at a stand, it 
finally reached the line of the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad. At this point it was re-en 
forced, the enemy held in check, and finally driven back. After hard fighting, a line of battle 
was re-established and maintained until the close of the action. 

When the First was driven from its line it was broken into squads, several of which skir 
mished with the enemy, and did good service in checking his onset. One under Lieutenant 
Darnbursch, of Company B, repulsed an attack from the enemy s cavalry. Before reaching the 
Nashville Railroad the bulk of the regiment was rallied by Major J. A. Stafford (commanding 
the regiment) and formed on the right of the Sixth Ohio, where it fought gallantly until 
driven back. During the 1st, 2d, and 3d of January there was considerable maneuvering by 
the enemy, and some skirmishing. On the 2d of January a heavy attack was made on the left 
of the National lines. In this attack the 1st Ohio did not participate. 

On January 4th it was ascertained that the enemy had evacuated Murfreesboro , and on the 
6th the First passed through that place and went into camp four miles out on the Shelbyville 
Turnpike. W T hile lying at Murfreesboro the army was reorganized, and the First Ohio was 
placed in the Second Division of the Twentieth Army Corps. 

On June 24, 1863, the movement on Tullahoma commenced. The enemy was encountered 

on the first day s march, at Liberty Gap, twelve miles from Murfreesboro . The First was not 

actively engaged in this affair, being held in reserve, but was under a heavy artillery fire. June 

26th, at eight P. M., the regiment was withdrawn from the picket line, leaving its fires burning, 

VOL. II. 2. 



18 OHIO IN THE WAR 

and made a niglit march of five miles through rain and deep mud to Millersburg. The march on 
Tullahoma was one of the most severe the regiment had ever experienced, the rain falling con 
stantly, and the roads being rendered almost impassable from the mud and broken-down vehicles. 

Manchester, Tennessee, was reached June 29th. At this place all the extra baggage of the 
army, including the knapsacks of the men, were sent back to Murfreesboro . 

On July 1st the regiment passed through Manchester, and arrived at Tullahoma at one 
o clock that night. At this place extensive Rebel camps were found tents still standing artil 
lery, shells, etc., lying at the depot. On the 2d these shells by accident exploded, killing two 
members of the First, and wounding several others. 

On August 16th the line of March was resumed, passing through Estell Springs, Winchester, 
Salem, across Smoky Mountain, through White and Paint Rock Gaps, and encamping at Belle- 
fonte, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, on the 22d. 

On August 30th the Chickamauga campaign was initiated, and the First Ohio moved to 
Stevenson, Alabama. It crossed the Tennessee at Caperton s Ferry on the 31st of August. Sep 
tember 2d it ascended the Sand or Raccoon Mountains, and marched across them to Winston s 
Gap. September 9th it crossed the Lookout range of mountains a march of twenty-three miles. 

On the afternoon of the 13th of September the troops were recalled from Broomtown Valley. 
They recrossed the Lookout range, and moving down the valley, again ascended Lookout on 
the 16th, passing along its crest and descending at Catletts Gap, near Pond Springs, having 
marched twenty-six miles in one day. September 18th the First Ohio was placed on picket near 
the right of the National lines. There was constant firing between the pickets during this day. 
At nine o clock A. M. of the 19th the regiment was relieved from picket-duty and marched to the 
support of General Thomas. After a march of ten miles, frequently stopping to form line of battle, 
the regiment reported to General Thomas, was placed in line of battle with the Second Division, 
and directed to recover the ground from which General Baird s division had just been driven 
with great slaughter. The position of the First was in the front line on the right of the Fourth 
Brigade. While forming its line and preparing for a charge, it was subjected to heavy firing. 
Two men were torn from its ranks by round shot. 

The charge was made and the enemy driven from the captured position, leaving in our hands 
all the artillery that had been captured from Terrill in the morning, with the addition of two 
guns belonging to the enemy. The enemy was steadily driven for a mile and a half, and to a 
point far beyond the ground occupied by Baird in the morning. At this point the regiment 
halted, a*nd the brigade commanders formed a line of battle, which was quickly assailed by the 
enemy in a determined effort to recover their losses. The attack was handsomely repulsed, and 
two more pieces of artillery captured. 

Additional re-enforcements were brought up by the enemy, and about sunset he was observed 
massing troops in front for another attack. Before this time orders had been received by the 
brigade commanders to fall back to the main National lines, which were not acted on because of 
some misunderstanding respecting the picket-lines. About dusk the enemy came up in great 
force, crushing back the right brigade and seriously shaking the center, the left of which, com 
posed of the Fifteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, fell back in confusion. This compelled the First 
Ohio (which joined the Fifteenth on the left, at an angle of about one hundred and twenty 
degrees) to change its position in order to confront the enemy. In performing this movement the 
First was compelled to fall back about one hundred and fifty yards, where it re-formed its lines. 
A most terrific fight ensued in the gathering darkness, added to which the smoke from the first 
discharge made it impossible to see anything in front but the flash of the enemy s guns. A Rebel 
battery which had been brought close up to the front of the National lines lost every horse and 
every man by the murderous fire poured into it. Such a contest could not last long, and the fight 
soon ceased, the enemy having fallen back. The division (National) now received orders and 
fell back to a point where it had left its knapsacks, and laid down for the night. < 

Early on the following morning rude breastworks were thrown up in front of the National 
lines. The First occupied the second line of intrenchments. At eight o clock the enemy attacked 



FIRST Omo INFANTRY. 19 

the left of the National lines, and extended his attack around the line. The National skir 
mishers were rapidly driven in, and the enemy appeared in force in front, but unable to withstand 
the withering fire by which he was received, fell back almost immediately, and could not after 
ward be brought to close work. 

About one o clock P. M. a heavy Rebel force which had passed around the National left 
wing, was observed driving some scattering soldiers through an open woods almost in the imme 
diate rear of the National lines. The First Ohio and the Louisville Legion were quickly "about- 
faced." Advancing to the edge of the timber through which the National lines ran they 
delivered a volley and charged. The Rebels instantly gave way and iled. The First was then 
ordered back to its position in line. 

At sunset orders were received from General Thomas to fall back upon Mission Ridge. The 
Rebels at this time were swarming over the intrenchments thrown up by Reynolds s command, 
which had fallen back in obedience to orders. These works were to the immediate right of the 
position occupied by the First Ohio. The broad open field in front of the regiment was crossed 
under fire, but with slight loss. General Steedman and his command were met at this point, 
having also fallen back. Pausing to form the troops, the National forces marched to Rossville 
unpursued by the enemy. 

The loss of the regiment in killed and wounded was, in this battle, one hundred and twenty, 
a majority of Avhom fell in the terrific fight of Saturday evening. Lieutenant John W. Jackson, 
a resident of New Lisbon, Ohio, was killed in this action. He was a gallant and meritorious 
officer, and was greatly lamented by his fellow-soldiers. A gallant soldier, Sergeant Burgtorf, 
was also killed. Among the wounded were Captain Darnbursch, Lieutenant Grove, and Lieu 
tenant Hallenburg. The last named fell into the hands of the enemy. 

September 21st, at daylight, a line of battle was formed and breastworks thrown up. The 
day was spent awaiting an attack from the enemy, but he did not appear. At half past twelve 
on the morning of the 22d, the National forces withdrew and marched into Chattanooga. In 
forming the lines around the city the First Ohio was placed on the left of the Chattanooga road, 
its right resting at the bridge over Chattanooga Creek, where it lay for one hour and a half under 
the fire of two Rebel batteries without being able to return a shot. The loss of the regiment 
from this cannonading was one killed and five wounded. This position was occupied by the First 
Ohio until the night of the 25th of September, fighting the enemy by day and building earth 
works by night. It then fell back to the second line of works, and for the first time in eight 
days the men were allowed to throw off their accouterments and rest in comparative safety. 

From the beginning of March. 1863, up to and including the battle of Chickamauga, and 
the operations around Chattanooga, Lieutenant-Colonel Bassett Langdon was in command of the 
First Ohio. 

About the 20th of October the Twentieth Army Corps was consolidated with the Fourth 
Corps, and the First Ohio was brigaded under General Hazen, in the Third Division of that corps. 
On the 20th of October the First Ohio had formed part of the important expedition down 
the Tennessee River to Brown s Ferrv, which resulted in the surprise and capture of the ridge 
commanding the ferry, and the roads between Lookout Valley and the Raccoon Mountains, thus 
enabling supplies to reach Chattanooga. In this affair Surgeon J. C. Barr received a flesh wound 
in the arm while crossing the river under the fire of the enemy. 

On November 23, 1863, the battle of Orchard Knob was fought really the opening of the 
battle of Mission Ridge. About noon of that day the First Ohio, consolidated with the Twenty- 
Third Kentucky, the whole under commarfd of Lieutenant-Colonel Bassett Langdon, was formed in 
column doubled on the center, to the right of Hazen s brigade. It immediately advanced on the 
enemy, driving in his pickets and attacking his rifle-pits on the knob. The pits and one hundred 
and fifty prisoners were captured, and the Rebels driven into their intrenchments at the foot of 
Mission Ridge. That night was spent in reversing the captured rifle-pits and constructing other 
defensive works. This position was held until the afternoon of the 25th. 

At half past three of the 25th of November the First Ohio was placed in the front line on 



20 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

the right of the brigade and division. At the signal of three guns the forces moved off and were 
saluted by the enemy s batteries on the crest of the ridge, some thirty or forty in number. The 
space to be traversed was about one mile, mostly open ground. The movement was performed 
in quick time to within three hundred yards, when the troops charged on the double-quick, and 
the Rebels were fairly lifted out of their works almost without firing a shot. 

The National forces, in obedience to orders, took possession of the abandoned works and 
sought to protect themselves within them. While occupying this position the First Ohio suf 
fered severely, and it became apparent that the only safe course left was to make a dash at the 
top of the ridge. Lieutenant-Colonel Langdon was the first to see the necessity. Getting his 
regiment in line, and rising to the height of the occasion, he pointed with his sword to the sum 
mit of the ridge and moved on. The whole command caught the inspiration and mounted the 
almost perpendicular sides of the hill with an energy superhuman. The enemy was amazed at 
the audacity of the movement, but contested the fight with stubbornness. 

The intensity of the Rebel fire was such that five color-bearers of the First Ohio were either 
killed or wounded. The last one, Captain Trapp, of Company G, was wounded twice within 
twenty paces of the crest of the hill, while gallantly heading the regiment. At this time the 
regiment had assumed the shape of a letter A. The nature of the ground being such as to pro 
tect the head of the regiment from the Rebel fire in its front, it was halted to gather strength for 
the final charge. A few minutes sufficed to effect this, and the first and second lines moved up in 
mass, breaking over and carrying the enemy s works and the crest of the hill. While directing 
the movement, at the head of the column and within about twenty paces of the crest, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Langdon was shot in the face, the ball coming out al the back of the neck. The shock 
of the ball disabled him for a few minutes, but he recovered his feet and charged with his men to 
within ten paces of the works, when loss of blood compelled him to retire, not, however, without 
witnessing the capture of the Rebel Avorks. Major Stafford, of the First, was wounded at the 
foot of the hill, but accompanied his regiment to the top, and carried the flag into the works on 
the crest. Lieutenant Christopher Wollenhaupt and Sergeant-Major Ogden Wheeler were killed 
near the crest of the ridge. The entire loss of the regiment was five officers and seventy-eight 
men killed and wounded. 

On November 28, 1863, the First started with other regiments and marched to the relief of 
General Burnside at Knoxville. On this march and during the East Tennessee campaign, the 
men suffered intensely from cold, scanty rations, and ragged clothing. January 17, 1864, the 
regiment had a brisk engagement with the enemy at Dandridge, losing some men. During 
this campaign the First volunteered three different times to re-enlist as veterans, but on each 
occasion was prevented from doing so by apprehension of attack and other causes. On one of 
these occasions the men had actually marched six miles on their way homeward. 

On May 4, 1864, the First Ohio started with Sherman s forces on the Atlanta campaign. 

On the 10th of May, at Buzzard s Roost it had a skirmish, in which Lieutenant Darnbursch 
and six men were wounded, and three killed. May 14th it had another engagement near Resaca, 
with a loss of two killed and sixteen wounded. Among the severely wounded was Captain 
Louis Kuhlman, of Company D. The next day it suffered a loss of four killed and twelve 
wounded. May 17th, near Adairsville, a sharp skirmish was had with the enemy. Loss, two 
killed and two wounded. Among the latter was Lieutenant George McCracken, of Company II. 
May 27th, at Burnt Hickory, the regiment lost two officers, Lieutenants Dickson and Grove, and 
eight men killed, and two officers and seventy-one men wounded. June 17th, at Kenesaw, eight 
men were wounded. At the crossing of Chattahoochie River two men were killed. After this 
affair the regiment did not meet with any notable encounters. Almost immediately thereafter 
it commenced to be mustered out by companies the last one on the 14th of October, 1864. 

During its term of service the First Ohio was engaged in twenty-four battles and skirmishes, 
and had five hundred and twenty-seven officers and men killed and wounded. It saw its initial 
battle at Pittsburg Landing, and closed its career in front of Atlanta. It marched about two thou 
sand five hundred miles, and was transported by car and steamboat nine hundred and fifty miles. 



{SECOND OHIO INFANTRY. 



21 



2d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 






April 
" 

Juno 
April 

June 
April 

June 


17, 1861 
17, || 

18; " 
18, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, 
17, 
17, 
17, 
17, 
17, 
17, 
29, 
17, 
17, 


April 

June 
April 


17, 1861 
17, || 

is; " 

18, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
29, " 
17, " 
17, 


Resigned July 13, 1861. 

Resigned. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 
Surgeon 
As t Surgeon. 
Captain 
Do 


RODNEY MASON 
AUGUSTUS C. PAKRY 
CLARK M. MCDERMONT 
JAMES D. WEIIIJ 
George M. Finch 
Henry Thrall 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


A Mitchell 


James G. Baldwin 
Charles Hallenhoft. 
E C Mason 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


J.Q. Black 
A.G. McCo,,k 
L A Harris 


W. Baldeon 

David King 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


E D Sanders 


Albert G. Toother 


J. E.Kiggs 
Hen j. Russ 


17, 
17, 
17, | 

17; " 
17, " 
17, || 

29, " 
27, " 


Ju ne 

April 


I 7 , 
17, 
1", 
17, 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
25, " 
29, 
17, 


David King 


J. E TavloY.... 


Y. A. Gamble 
W. A. Smith 
T. T. Brund 
A. S. Berrvhil] 
Howard I). John 
F. S. Wallace 


H H Thatcher. 


17, " 
17, " 
17, " 


14 


17, 
17, 
17, 


G. V. S. Askew 
Jacob Waldman 


M Mel ov 


17, " 

17, " 
17, " 

if; :: 

25, 


* 
.June 


17, 

17, 


Arthur Carnahan 
John Herrell 


Alexander Berry hi 11 
Henry Ashton... 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


RF.MAHKS. 


Colonel 
Do 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Haior 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Surceon 
Do 


LEONARD A. HARRIS.... 
JOHN KELL 
ANSON G. McCOOK 
JOHN KFI i- 


Aug. 
Dec. 

Aug. 
Dec. 

March 

March 
Aug. 
Feb. 

Fe lf." 
Aug. 

Dec. 
July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Oct. 


6, 

31*. 

6, 
24, 

".1, 

24! 
31. 
3, 

27, 
28, 
27, 
28, 

r. ~. 

27, 
1, 
19, 
20, 
31, 
5, 
1, 
l.\ 
1, 
2". 
8, 

si ; 


1S61 

1862 

1861 

1862 

1861 
1861 
18i>2 
1861 

1863 
1861 


Dec. 

Jan. 
Dec. 

March 
Dec. 

Feb. 
March 
Dec. 
Feb. 

Dec. 

Feb. 
Aug. 

Dec. 


13, 

24, 
19, 
13, 
24, 
31, 
3, 
I-"., 
24, 
26, 
3, 
13, 

13; 
28, 
29, 
11. 
13, 
13, 
13, 


1861 
1862 
1863 
1861 
1862 

1861 
1862 

1864 
1861 

1862 
1861 
1862 


Resigned December 4, 1862. 
Killed at MurfreesboiV December 31, 1862. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Colonel December 24, 1862. 
Promoted December 31, 1862. 
Hon. Discli d on ace t of wounds Feb. 1, 1864. 

Promoted December 24, 1862. 
Promoted December 31. 1>62. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Resign".! January 23. 1862. 
Mustered out October 10, 186-1. 
Promoted F -bm;u-v 28, 1862. 
.Appointed Surgeon of tin- 116th 0. V. I. 


\\sov Ti MrCooK.. . 


O C MAXWELL 


WILLIVM ! BFVPTY.. 


ANSON G. McCooK 
O. C. MAXWF.M 
WIM.IAM T. BEATTY 
JAMES F. SAIUIATT 
D. E. WADE 
B F MILLKJI. . . . 


Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 


15. F. MILLEI; 
THOMAS J. SHANNON 
W. A. CAUMICHAEI 
\ S COM its 


IS? 


Refused t 

Resigned 
Promoted 
Killed at 
Dismisse. 
Killed at 


< muster; commission returned. 
February 10. l.<63. 
December.",!. 1.--62. 

Chaplin Hill Octobers, 1862. 
DhopHn 1 Hill October 8. 1862. 


M \X\VFLL P G\DUIS.. . . 


Captain 
Do 

Do 


Win. T. Beattv 
Alexander S. Berryiiill 
Wm A Smith 


Do 


John Herrell 


Do 0. C. Maxwell 
Do James F. Siirratt 
Do John C. Ha/Jctt 
Do ; Milton McCoy 
Do id eorce D. McKinnev 
Do David Mitchell 





Jan. 


13 

28*, 
28, 
28, 


1862 


Promoted to Major. 
Died June 7, 1S63: from w nds rce d D 
Resigned March !. 1>63. [ar\ 
Discharged October 24. 1863; Restort 
Mustered out October 10. 1>64. 


c. 31/62. 
19. 1864. 
d JailD- 


DO ;;;;;;;;; 

Do 

Do 


Jacob Fottrell 
Wm. S. B. Randall 

John I <:;ill!i"lii.r 


|| 


Feb. 
Jan. 


2fi, 
26, 


1863 


Mustered 

Mustered 
Mustered 


out October 10. 1864. 
OUt October id, 1S61. 
out Oi^olcT 10. 1*64. 


Do Jam ea War nock 



22 



OHIO IN THE WAS. 



DATE OF BANK.; COM. ISSCED. 



Captain 

Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
1st Lieutenanl 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

I 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



James E. Murdoch, jr. 

II. Lee Anderson 

James W. Glasener 

George A. Hollister 

Jerome A. Fisher 

Jacob A. Leonard 

John B. Emory 

Wm. 8. B. Randall 

James Ambrose 

James Warnock 

Jacob Fottrell 

John A. Allen 

James W. Glasener 

George Todd 

Henry Lee Anderson.... 
George A.Vandegrift.... 
George A. Hollister 



March 1, 
July 12, 
Jan. 1, 



March 19 
May 9 
Sept. 30 
July 27 
Aug. 1, 



reorge A. Hollister 
i. \v. Plummer 



David Clingman.. 

J. R. D. Clendenning.... 

William Thacker 

John F. Gallagher 

Richard S. Chambers.... 

Lafayette Van Horn 

John F. Horr 

Jerome A. Fisher 

George W. Landrum 

Jacob A. Leonard 

James E. Murdoch, jr.., 

John Thomas 

Thomas Dyall 

Ira H. Bird 

Andrew J. Tetor 

Malachi Krebs 

Jacob C. Staley 

George W. Stoddard 

Henry Purlier 

Julius F. Williams 

B. F. Brady 

John B. Emory 

William Thacker 

John F. Horr 

jleorge W. Landrum 

Jerome A. Fisher 

Ira H. Bird 

John F. Gallagher 

Lafayette Van Horn 

Thomas McCary 

lames E. Murdoch, jr... 
iichard S. Chambers.... 

Thomas S. Dyall 

Tames A. Suter 

facob A. Leonard 

r ohn W. Thomas 

JeorgeW. Stoddard 

lenry Purlier 

Malachi Krebs 

acob C. Stalev 

Daniel W. De Witt 

John F. Davis 

ulius F. Williams 

Andrew J. Tetor 

ohn B. Emory 

Aaron McCune 

rVilliam Pit linger 

lorace Abbott 

A. W. Henry 

B. F. Brady 



Sept. 
Jan. 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Aug. 
Sept. 

Dec. 

March 

Dec. 

Sept. 
Oct. 



Dec. 

March 

June 

April 

July 

Jan. 



1863 March 

" lAug. 
1864, Feb. 

" i March 
IMay 

ISept. 
1861 Dec. 



Jan. 



12, 

1, 
1, 

1, 

1. 

1. 

1, 

March 19, 
July 27, 

I . 1 , 
20, 
21, 
31, 

Sept. 5, 

Aug. 



A ug. 



Dec. 
March 

ly 



Oct. 

Dec. 

April 
Jan. 
April 
July 

Jan. 



1862 



Marcl 



April 

June 
Aug. 
Feb. 



March 
Dec. 



Jan. 



13, 1863 

1, 

4, 1864 

4, " 
19, " 

9, " 
30, " 
13, 186 
13, 

If 

13, 
13, 

9, 18f 
28, 
13, 

9 t 

28, 



28, 
20, 

| 

1 

12, 1863 
26, 
26, 



15, 

1, 

4, 1664 

4, 

1, 

4* " 
4, " 
19, " 
13, 1861 



13 
13 

28, ISP2 R 
28, 



March 20, " 

20, " 

30, " 

24, " 

24, " 

24, " 

24, " 

24, " 

11, 1863 

11, " 



Feb. 
April 



June 
Aug. 

Jan. 



Resigned November 7, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned. 

Resigned March 30, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 

Transferred to 18th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
Promoted December 31, 1862, to Captain. 
Promoted Octobers, 1862, to Captain. 
Promoted October 2, 1862, to Captain. 
Promoted October 8, 1862, to Captain. 
Resigned March 3, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Declined. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned April 25, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned September 17, 1862. 
Resigned December 8, 1861. 
Resigned December 7, 1861. 
Resigned as Second Lieutenant August 9, 1862. 
Promoted December 31, 1862, to Captain. 
Killed in action December 31 1863. 
Died Jan. 12,1863; from \v ndsrec d Dec. 31 62 
Resigned October 23, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 

Killed at Chicka mantra September 25, 1363. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted March 1. 1863. 

Killed at Peaehtree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1S64. 
Resigned October 24, 1863. 
Mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Mustered out March 25, 1865. 
Mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Mustered out October 10, 1864. 
.Mustered out March 12, 1865. 
Mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Promoted to command detachment. [9,1S62. 
Promoted December 8, 1861 ; Resigned August 
romoted October 8, 1862. 
romoted October 2, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 

romoted October 8. 1862, to First Lieutenant. 

romoted to First Lieutenant. 
?i-omoted March 2, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Sept. 17, 1862, to First Lieutenant, 
designed July 17, 1862. 
" romoted December 31, 1862. 
romoted December 8, 1861. 
romoted to First Lieutenant. 
Declined. 

romoted Dec. 31, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 

romoted March 1, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 

romoted to First Lieutenant. 

romoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant, 
romoted to First Lieutenant, 
lesigned April 3, 1863. 
Designed July 24, 1863. 
"romoted to First Lieutenant. 

romoted to First Lieutenant. 

romoted to First Lieutenant. 
Mustered out December 19, 1864. 
Never mustered. 

ever mustered. 

e\er mustered. 

romoted to First Lieutenant. 



SECOND OHIO INFANTRY. 



SECOND OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE SECOND OHIO was organized at Camp Dennison, in August and September, 
1861. Before this period it had served in the three months campaign, and partici 
pated in the first "flurry" of the war around Washington City. In the organization 
for three years, the majority of the field, line, and staff had seen service in different capacities 
in the three months service, many of them participating in the first eastern campaign of the 
regiment, including its honorable service at the first Bull Run. 

In September, 1861, the regiment, with a full complement of officers and over nine hun 
dred men, crossed the Ohio River, and by direction of General O. M. Mitchel, then in command 
at Cincinnati, moved by the way of Paris and Mount Sterling, to Olympian Springs, in Eastern 
Kentucky. As it was the first regiment of National soldiers ever seen in that section of the 
State, both officers and men resolved to do their very best, by good conduct and courteous 
treatment, to show the citizens that the Yankees were not so bad as they had been represented. 
The result was, that the regiment left behind it a fair name, which is yet adverted to in the sec 
tion of country in which they were encamped. 

At Olympian Springs the Second was engaged in scouting and intercepting the numerous 
bands from Central Kentucky on their way to join the Rebel army in the South, induced thereto 
by Buckner and John C. Breckinridge. 

On the 22d of October the regiment made a forced night march of nearly thirty mile, sur 
prised, at West Liberty, and totally defeated a band of Rebels under Jack May, inflicting some 
loss to the enemy in killed and wounded, and coming off scathless. Subsequently joining the 
command of General Nelson, it participated in a movement tOAvard Prestonburg, causing its 
evacuation by the enemy. The Second also assisted in the repulse of the Rebels at Ivy Mount 
ain, quite a spirited affair, in which it suffered the loss of one man killed and one officer, (Cup- 
tain Berry hill), and seven men wounded. The enemy was pursued to Piketon, Kentucky, and 
with the balance of the force the regiment marched down the Big Sandy to Louisa, Kentucky ; 
thence to Louisville by water. 

At Louisville the regiment was brigaded with other troops under the command of Colonel 
Joshua W. Sill, attached to the division of General O. M. Mitchel. 

The winter months of 1861-2 were spent in cantonments at Bacon Creek, where they per 
fected themselves in drill and discipline, preparatory to entering upon the arduous work before 
them. In the month of February, 1862, the division moved in the advance of the Army of the 
Ohio, Major-General D. C. Buell commanding, on Bowling Green, Gallatin, and Nashville, 
occupying the last-named place. 

When, in March, the main body of General Buell s army marched to the assistance of Gen 
eral Grant at Pittsburg Landing, General O. M. Mitchel s division, to which the Second Ohio 
was attached, moved on Murfreesboro , Shelbyville, Fayetteville, and Huntsville. The regiment 
on this march was engaged in several small affairs with the enemy on the line of the Memphis 
and Charleston Railroad, the most considerable of which, at Widow s Creek, near Bridgeport, 
resulted in the dispersion of a force placed to dispute the passage of the creek, and the capture 
of their camp equipage. The Second Ohio was also with the column that first occupied Bridge 
port, and destroyed the railroad bridge at that point across the Tennessee River. 

When General Bragg, by his invasion of Kentucky, caused our forces to fall back on Lou 
isville, the Second Ohio, then stationed at Battle Creek, Tennessee, moved across the mountain* 



24 Oino IN THE WAR. 

via Manchester, Murfreesboro , Nashville, Bowling Green, Green Eiver, and Louisville, under 
command of Lieutenant-Colonel Kell, Colonel Harris being in command of the brigade. In 
the re-organization of the army at Louisville, the regiment was assigned to Rosseau s division 
in General McCook s left wing, and Avith two divisions of that command participated in the 
well-contested battle of Perryville or Chaplin Hills, fought on the 8th of October, 1862, losing 
in the action nearly forty per cent, of all engaged. Captains Berryhill and Herrel, and twenty- 
seven enlisted men, were killed; and Captains Beatty, Maxwell, and McCoy, and eighty-seven 
enlisted men, woimded. With the army, the Second Ohio continued in pursuit of the enemy 
up to Crab Orchard. Finding it impracticable to pursue the fleeing Confederates further, or 
supposing so, at least, General Buell turned the head of his column toward Nashville again, 
reaching that city on the 26th of February, 1862. On the march, however, General Buell had 
been superseded in the command of the army, by General Win. S. Rosecran?. On the 30th of 
October, 1862, the new order of things commenced. The new chief took hold of matters ener 
getically, the name of the department was changed, and the army itself rebaptized as the "Army 
of the Cumberland." The new General took personal command at Bowling Green, on the 1st 
day of November, and established his head-quarters, temporarily, at that point. The Rebel 
army was still making its difficult way over the rugged mountains of East Tennessee, with a 
wide detour, via Chattanooga, toward Murfreesboro . General Breckinridge was at Murfreesboro 
with a strong division, and Nashville itself was invested by a large force of enterprising Rebel 
cavalry. That city was held by a fine division of troops under General Negley, and was con 
sidered safe in their hands. The Rebels could not concentrate for its assault before General 
Rosecrans could move to its relief. General Rosecrans, therefore, contented himself with keep 
ing his communications open with Nashville, and entered energetically into the important work 
of perfecting the re-organization of his command, and repairing the railroad and bridges, over 
which the whole subsistence of the army would necessarily have to be transported. As a pru 
dent General, he did not wish to arrive at his terminus or base without the certainty of being 
able to subsist his men steadily, and without greater interruption than the ordinary casualties of 
war, and wear and tear of railroad machinery. Lines of couriers connecting with Nashville 
and the various camps were established ; maps of the country were collected from every source ; 
and business of every kind pertaining to the campaign was thoroughly systematized and rapidly 
dispatched. Discontent in the army was almost overwhelming, but the General found a way to 
correct it. Impartiality was his text, and he adhered to it strictly. Furloughs, resignations, and 
sick-leaves were summarily stopped, and every officer required to rigidly enforce the "rules and 
regulations," and to shape his exertions and labor with an eye and aim singly to the good of the 
service. Working to this end, and to this purpose, as one man, the object was attained, and the 
"Army of the Cumberland" marched into Nashville a thoroughly organized and effective 
"machine" with which to operate against the Herculean efforts of the Rebel hosts in their front. 

The division to which the regiment was attached had in the meantime been assigned to 
the Fourteenth Army Corps, General Geo. II. Thomas, in which command it remained up to 
Atlanta, and participated in all the marches and battles of that distinguished corps. 

On the 31st of December, 1862, in the battle of Stone River, the Second Ohio was closely 
engaged, and suffered serious loss. Its Colonel, John Kell, was killed at the head of the 
regiment; Major Maxwell was slightly wounded ; Captain Hazlett, Lieutenants Chambers and 
Van Horn, and seven enlisted men, were also killed, and a large number of men wounded. In 
this action the regiment, with the assistance of Guenther s Battery H, Fourth Artillery, cap 
tured the colors of the Thirty-Second regiment Arkansas volunteers. 

Murfreesboro was occupied until the spring of 1863, when a forward movement was made by 
the Army of the Cumberland. The month of June found General Rosecrans on the " war-path " 
toward Tullahoma and Shelby ville, where the Rebel General Bragg had strongly fortified his 
lines. The advance of the National forces was not very vigorously contested; but several quite 
spirited affairs occurred, in one of which, at Hoover s Gap, the Second suffered the loss of one 
man killed and two wounded. 



SECOND OHIO INFANTRY. 25 

Chickamauga was the next battle-ground. In this hotly-contested engagement the regiment 
lost Lieutenant Geo. Landrum (detached on General Thomas staff) killed, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Maxwell (then in command) wounded, Major Beatty, Adjutant John Thomas, Captains Randall 
and Gallagher, and Lieutenants Tetor and Pnrlier captured. Aggregate loss in this engage 
ment, one hundred and eighty-three officers and men, killed, wounded, and missing. 

After falling hack into the intrenchments at Chattanooga, they remained in that prison- 
house until the 24th of November, 1862, when the brigade to which the Second was attached was 
sent to the assistance of General Hooker, on Lookout Mountain, in his celebrated battle above the 
clouds. In the night engagement th$ regiment lost four enlisted men killed, and Captain James 
Warnock, Lieutenant John Emory, and nine enlisted men were wounded. In the battle of 
Mission Ridge, which occurred on the succeeding day, the regiment made its way to the crest 
with slight loss, and captured the colors of the Thirty-Eighth Alabama volunteers. The Second, 
with its brigade, pursued the enemy to Ringgold, Georgia, at which place a halt was made. 

In the reconnoissance to Buzzard s Roost, in February, 186 1, the Second was in the advance, 
and developed the strength of the enemy s position before Dalton. 

In the following May the regiment formed a portion of Sherman s force for the Atlanta cam 
paign, and on the 14th of that month, at Resaca, suffered heavily in an attempt to carry by 
assault the enemy s intrenched position. In this action Captain Jacob Fottrell and twelve 
enlisted men were killed, and Captains Staley and Mitchel, and twenty-seven enlisted men 
wounded. 

The Second Ohio then moved with the division through Georgia to the Chattahoochie River, 
and took part in the battle at Peachtree Creek, July 21, 1864, where First Lieutenant and Adju 
tant John W. Thomas (acting on the staff of the brigade commander) was killed the last man 
of the regiment to offer up his life for the cause. 

The regiment remained in front of Atlanta until August 1, 1864, when orders were received 
to march to Chattanooga, preparatory to final discharge. After several unsuccessful chases after 
the Rebel General "Wheeler, within the space of four weeks, the regiment was finally sent to 
Columbus, Ohio, where, after thirty-eight months of active service, it was honorably discharged 
and mustered out of the United States service. 

It is impossible, owing to the loss of official papers, to give the exact casualties of the regi 
ment. When mustered in, it was nearly up to the maximum strength. It received about one 
hundred and fifty recruits ; thirty-three enlisted as veterans, and about three hundred and fifty 
were mustered out. The number of men and officers killed in battle was one hundred and 
eleven; wounded, (including those wounded more than once), four hundred and twenty-five. 

The nucleus of this regiment, like that of the Sixth and others raised in Cincinnati, was 
found in one of the independent peace organizations of the city. It was commanded through 
part of its career by Colonel L. A. Harris (late mayor of Cincinnati), and a native of that city. 



26 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



3d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colom-1 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 
Surgeon 
Asst. Surgeon 


ISAAC II. MARROW 
JOHN BEATTY 

J. WAUIIKN KKIFJ:U 

RoliKHT K. McMEANS 

H II SFYS 


April 
May 


27, 
27, 
27, 

-" , 

V 


1861 


April 
May 


27, 
27, 

29 , 
2 

3, 


1861 






Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Ist.Lieuteii ut 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


J. H. Wins, 


April 

Nov. 
May 
April 

Nov. 
May- 
April 

Nov. 
Aug. 


19, 
27, 

1", 
19, 
23! 

*?. 

.".. 
1", 
26, 
l?i 
19, 
23, 

19, 
30, 
1, 

.;:; 

30, 
19, 
19, 
23, 
22, 
19, 
30, 
1, 
W, 


1860 
1861 

1S<0 
18i 1 

1860 
1861 


April 

Nov. 
May 
April 

Nov. 
May 
April 

Nov. 
Aug. 


19, 

27, 
19, 
19, 
23, 
22, 
19, 
30, 
1, 
3, 
19, 
26, 
19, 
19, 
23, 
22, 
19, 
30, 
1, 
3, 
19. 
30, 
19, 
19, 

i 

19, 
30, 
1, 
H, 


I860 
1861 

1860 
1861 

1860 
1861 


James Cornelius Vananda. 
Kphraim P. Abbott 
\V . Clement llo.ssman 
Owen T. Turnoy 
Leonidas McDogal 
David Colvin Rose 
Henry Cope 
K 1) House 


\V H Sa-e 


Nelson H. Van Yorlies 




Jerome Buckingham 




John McNeil 


Asa H Batton 




W L Patterson 


A 51 Goodspeed 


A?el Babb Smith 




James Smith Wilson 
E T McGill 


Francis P. Dale 
James St. John 


James F. Smith 





ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 




IS \ AC II M \RROW 


Tune 12, 1861 
Feb ry 12, 1862 
Nov. 29, " 
Juno 12, 1861 
Feb ry 12, 1S62 
Sept. 16, " 
Nov. 29, " 
June 12, 1861 
Feb ry 12, 1862 
Sept. 16, " 
Nov. 29, " 
June 12, 1861 
Nov. 7, 1862 
June 12, 1861 
Aug. 21, 1862 
July 5, " 
Sept. 1, 1863 
Oct. 6 " 
June 27, 1861 
11, " 
" 11, " 
" 11, 
" 11, 
11, 
11, 
11 11, 
14 11, 
" 11, 
" 20, 
Dec. 21, " 
Feb ry 28, 1862 
April 9, " 
Aug. 4, " 
Sept. 3, " 
5, " 


June 
Feb ry 
April 
June 
Feb ry 
Sept. 
April 
June 
Feb ry 
Sept. 
April 
June 
Dec. 
Juno 
Aug. 
Feb ry 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Aug. 
June 

Dec. 
Feb ry 
Mav 
Aug. 
Se^>t. 


12, 1861 
12, 1862 
9, 186:5 
12, 1861 
12, 1862 
22, " 
9, 1863 
12, 1861 
12, 1862 

9 , 1863 
12, 1S61 
2, 1862 
12, istil 
29, 1862 
10, 1863 
1, " 
6, " 
3, 1861 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
21, " 
28, 1862 

i; :: 

16, " 


Resigned Feb ry 4, 1862. 
Appointed Brig. Gen. Vols., Nov. 29, 1862. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Promoted and appointed Col. 110 0. V. I. 
Resigned September 30, 1862. 
Promoted. 
Mustered out Juno 21, 1864. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Mustered out June 21, 1S64. 
Died October 30, 1862. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out July 3, 1864. 
Honorably discharged August 19, 1863. 
Commissioned returned. 
Declined. Returned commission. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Resigned December 9, 1861. 
Promoted. 
Resigned September 5, 1862 
Mustered out June 21, 1864 
Killed Octobers, 1862. 
Killed October 8, 1862. 
Resigned April 9, 1*12. 
Resigned August i, 1862. 
Appointed Lt. Col. 113th 0. V. I. Sept. 3, 1862. 
Resigned November 12, 1862. 
Resigned February IS, 1863. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out December 16, 1364. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 


Do 


JOHV BEATTY. 


DO .........;: 


ORRIS A. LAWSON 
JOHN BEATTY 


Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 


J. WARREN KriFEH 


ORRIS A. LAWSON 

J\MKS II WlNO 


Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 


J. WARREN KEIFEB 
ORRIS A. LAWSON 
JAMES H. WING 
JAMES C. VANANDA 
R. R. McMEANS 


Do 
Asst, Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do . . 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

DO! !!! .!""! 

Do 
Do 


WILLIAM L. PECK 
II. H. SKYS 


F. C. CLASON 

T. J. E\TON.. .. 


J. N. KINSM\N 


WESLEY II. RACE 
E. A. STRONG 


Orris A. Lawson 
James H. Win" 


Joseph M. Dana 


James C. Vananda 
Ephraim P. Abbott 
William Clement Rossman 
Leonidas McDogal 
Henry K. Cunard 
Asa II. Batton 
Philip Fithian 
John G. Mitchell 
Elitha D. House 
Wesley L. Patterson 
Lroy S. Bell 
Charles Byron 
James M. Imbra 



THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF BANK. 


COM. ISSUKD. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Jnines St. John 
William A. Swavy.e 
Edward 31. Driscoll 
Benj. C. G. Reed 
A. K. Tavlor 
John B. McRoberts 
John 1). Whiting 


Sept. 16, 1S62 
Nov. 12, " 

Oct. 8, " 

" sj " 

Feb ry IS, 1863 
)an. 1, " 
June 11, 1S61 
11, 
11, 
11. 
" 11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
" 20, " 
Aug. 1, " 
3, " 
Dec. 21, " 
)an. y, 1862 
11, " 
Feb ry 2s, " 
28, " 
March 12, || 

April ji , " 
June 30, " 
Vug. 4, " 
Dec. 21, 1861 
An. 19, 1862 
Sept. 3, " 

4 i ^ I b 

If), " 
Oct. 8, 


Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 

Feb ry 
Jan. 
June 

Aug. 

Dec. 
Jan. 

Feb ry 

March 

May 

June 
Aug. 
Sept. 

Oct. 
Dec. 


5, 1862 

20* " 
26, 186:; 

10, " 

11, ls6! 
11, " 
n, " 
11, " 
11, " 
ll, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 


Killed October 8, 1S62. 
Mustered out Juno 21, 1S64. 
Mustei-e.iout December 19, 1864. 
IM uttered out August 12, l,>>04. 
.Mustered out June 21, 1*64. 
Mustered out Jnni! 20, 1^64. 
Mustered out May 30, 1S65. 
Promoted. 

llesigjied October , l.Sf.l. 
Resigned March 12, I,stl2. 
Appointed (Juptain and C. S., Feb ry , 1363 
Resigned February 8, 1862 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

BS: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

g: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

So : 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Elitha 1). llon.se 
Wesley L. 1 atterHon 
Karl A. Cranston 
Joel K. Thomson 
Charles Allen 
Jerome B. Ebert 
Lerov S. B.-11 
James St. Jolm 


James M. Imbra 

John Ritchie 


John G. .Mitchell 
A. K. Taylor 


3, " 
21, " 

9, 1862 

11, " 

2.-, " 
2S, 
20, " 
1, " 
, " 
30, 4t 
28, " 
8, 
8, 
9, 

ir>, 


Promoted. 
Promoted. 

Resigned June 30, 1862. 
Declined. 
Mustered out March 12, ISM. 
Promoted. 
Mustered out Juno 21, 1864. 
Resigned August y, 1562. 
Promoted. 
Killed October 8, 1862. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
-Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out December 19, 1864. 
Mustered out 3Iarch 27, lsiy>. 
Mustered out January 6, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, Ic65. 
Mustered out August 12, ISM. 
Died in rebel prison September 29, 1864 
Mustered out March 12, lsr.:>. 
Mustered out March 12, 1865. 
Promoted. 
Resigned September 6, 1861. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Resigned August 23, 1861. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Killed at Elkwater, Virginia. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Commission returned. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
.Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Resigned November 24, 1362. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1364. 
Mustered out June 21, 18(54. 
Mustered out Juno 21, 1864. 
Mustered out December 19, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out March 27, 1.S65. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 


Lyno S. Sullivant 
Stephen 1). Carpenter 
William A. Sway/.e 


Frank P Dale 


Edward M. Driscoll 
Calvin L. Starr 
( - liarles Byron 


John B. McRoborts 
Bunj. C. G. Rood 
Jotin D Whiting 


Abraham Wolback 
John Richey 
Samuel B. Piper 
Joel G. Blue 


Kimball C. Wells 


" 8, 
" 8, 
" 8, 
Nov. 12, 
Feb ry IS, 1863 
Jan. 1, " 
June 11, 1861 
" 11, " 
" 11, " 
" 11, " 
" 11, " 
" 11, " 
" 11, " 
" 11, " 
" 11, " 
20, " 
July 31, " 
Aug. 23, " 
Dec. 21, " 
Jan. 11, 1862 
" 21, " 
Feb ry 28, " 
28, " 
March 12, " 
Feb ry 28, " 
April 9, " 
June 30, " 
March 29, " 
Aug. 4, " 
Dec. 21, " 
Aug, 19, 
Sept. 16, 
Oct, 8, 
" 8, 


Feb ry 
Jan, 
June 

Sept. 

Dec. 
Jan. 

Feb ry 
March 
May 

June 
July 
Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Dec. 


2K, 
26, 
26, 
26, 
26, 1863 
10, " 
11, 1*61 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
20, 

21, 
11, 1862 
21, ^ 

20 , " 
1, " 
1, " 
3, " 
22 " 
2.5, " 
28, " 
8, " 
16, || 

ioi " 

26, - 


David J. Kissinger 
Thos. B. Stevenson 
William A. Curry 


Oliver P. Barnes 




Wilbur II Sage.. . 




Stephen D. Carpenter 
Richard R. Johnson 


James S. Wilson 
Frank P. Dale 


Joseph I). More 




Edward M. Driscoll 
John B. McRoberts 


Benj C G Reed 




John D. Whiting 
Joel G. Blue 


Charles Hivling 
Samuel B. Piper 


Kimball C. Wells 


George W. Fish. 


Thomas B. Stevenson 


Albert G. Brush 


William A. Curry 
John C. Ronev 


Charles A. Maxwell 
George W. Bailey 
John W. Eliin 


Charles Trownsell 
Edwin Reid. . 


Oct. 8, 
" 8, 
Nov. 24, 
Feb ry 18, 1.SC.3 
Jan. 1, " 


Jan. 

Feb ry 
July 


2C., 1S63 
27, " 
27, " 
26, " 

y, " 


James Murdock 
Michael D Kin" 


George L. Wells 



28 OHIO IN THE WAE. 



THIRD OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



LIKE a majority of the regiments raised under President Lincoln s first proclamation, 
the Third Ohio Volunteer Infantry served under two separate terms of enlistment, 
April 16, 1861, and May 3, 1861, the first for three months and the latter for three years. 

The regiment was organized in the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio, at "Camp Jackson," the 
organization being completed by the 21st of April, and the most rigid drill being at once insti 
tuted. On the 27th of April it was mustered into the United States service. An election by 
ballot was held for field officers, which resulted in the choice of Isaac Marrow, of Columbus, 
Ohio, for Colonel ; John Beatty, of Morrow county, for Lieutenant-Colonel ; and J. Warren 
Keifer, of Clark county, for Major. 

On the 28th of April, the right wing of the regiment was sent to Camp Dennison, with 
orders to break ground and prepare a suitable camping place for the regiment. A newly- 
planted cornfield on the west side of the railroad was selected, and, without blankets, tents, or 
other covering, this detachment of the regiment passed its first night of field service. 

On the 30th the remainder of the regiment arrived, bringing with it lumber and tools, with 
which the men soon constructed comfortable quarters. Throughout the month of May the regi 
ment lay in this camp, and during that time was subjected to the most thorough discipline and 
drill that is, so far as drill could be carried by soldiers devoid of arms or uniforms. Near the 
last of May the men were supplied with an assortment of old arms, flint-locks altered to per 
cussion, and a small lot of blouses and gray pants. 

Before orders for the field arrived, a considerable portion of the three months term had 
expired ; and volunteers for three years being called for, the Third re-enlisted with alacrity and 
enthusiasm. Eecruiting parties were sent out, and on the 12th day of June, 1861, the regiment 
re-organized by re-electing their officers with great unanimity. 

On the 20th of January, 1862, the regiment was supplied with arms and uniforms, and 
ordered to proceed to Grafton, Virginia, then the seat of war. It was an event at that early 
day to witness the transportation of a regiment of men in war s full panoply, and the people 
along the line of railway by which the regiment moved (via Columbus and Xenia, and Central 
Ohio). assembled in crowds at every station, and bid the soldier boys God speed with tearful 
eyes and earnest prayers. 

The regiment arrived at Bellair on the 22d of June, in time to claim the honor of being the 
first three years regiment to leave the State. Crossing the Ohio Elver to the town of Benwood, 
it was supplied with the first instalment of ammunition. Grafton was reached on the 23d, 
where the regiment at once reported to Major-General McClellan. In the absence of tents, the 
men were assigned quarters in deserted houses at Fetterman, a little village two miles north of 
Grafton. Two days only were spent here, when the regiment proceeded by rail to Clarksburg, 
where camp equipage was supplied, and every preparation made for an active campaign. 

At this date (25th June, 1861) the Third Ohio was brigaded with the Fourth and Ninth Ohio 
and Loomis Michigan Battery, Brigadier-General Schleich, of Fairfield county, commanding. 

From Clarksburg the Third Ohio advanced with the army, nothing of interest occurring 
until the 5th of July, when the regiment lay at Buckhannon, Virginia, A scouting party of fifty 
men, under Captain O. A. Lawson, of company A, was sent out by General Schleich to reconnoi- 
ter the road leading to the Eebel position at Eich Mountain. Proceeding cautiously, the little 
band, upon approaching Middle Fork bridge, discovered that it was occupied by the enemy. A 



THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. 29 

gallant, but unsuccessful, effort was made to dislodge the Rebels. In this, its first drawing of 
blood, the detachment lost one man killed and five wounded. Gathering up the wounded, the 
party returned to camp. In the hurry of the search, the dead soldier was not found ; but a few 
days later, upon the general advance of the army, the body of private Johns was found and 
decently interred by his comrades. He was the first man of the Third Ohio to die in battle. 

At the battle of Rich Mountain the Third was in the division which was to advance directly 
on the enemy s works, but as the fight occurred in the rear of the fortifications, the regiment 
was not engaged. The pursuit of the flying enemy carried the Third Ohio and its division to 
Beverly on the 12th of July; thence to Huttonsville and Cheat Mountain Summit, where the 
pursuit was abandoned, and the troops commenced fortifying the passes of the Allefhanies. 

The Third Ohio returned to the foot of Cheat Mountain, where the greater part of it was 
engaged in erecting a line of telegraph from Huttonsville to the post of Cheat Mountain Summit. 

On the 4th of August the regiment marched to Elkwater Creek, and, in company with the 
Fifteenth Indiana Infantry and Loomis Battery, commenced a series of fortifications extending 
entirely across the valley. The common routine of camp life, varied by labor on the works 
and an occasional scout, occupied the time of the regiment until the llth of September, when 
the Rebels, under General Robert E. Lee, attacked the position, making their appearance on the 
Huntersville road, driving in the National pickets as they advanced. The Third Ohio, with 
the Fifteenth and Seventh Indiana, and a section of Loomis Battery, were in position at Elk- 
water Junction, and contested the Rebel advance in several sharp skirmishes ; in one of which, 
Colonel John A. Washington, of Mount Vernon, Va., was killed. He was at the time one of 
General Lee s staff officers. In all the subsequent movements of that period, resulting in the 
repulse of the Rebel army and its retirement to Mingo Flats, the Third Ohio took an active part. 

On the 3d of October two companies of the Third Ohio, under Captain McDougall, scouted 
the country as far as Marshall, and on the 6th the regiment made a reconnoissance to Big Springs, 
but found only deserted camps, the Rebels having given up the campaign. With this recon 
noissance ended the first campaign of the Third Ohio Volunteer Infantry. It was a campaign 
of peculiar hardship to the then new soldier, filled as it was with hard marches through the 
almost impenetrable mud, amid driving rain-storms, severe drilling, and some fighting. 

Proceeding to Clarksburg, the regiment enjoyed the first visit of the ever-welcome paymas 
ter. From there it went to Parkersburg by rail, and took steamers at the wharf of that place 
for Cincinnati, November 28. The regiment was cordially received at the Queen City, was 
reviewed on the main landing, and thereafter re-embarked for Louisville, Kentucky. Arriving 
at the last named city, it marched at once to Camp Jenkins, four miles distant from the city. 
At this place the Army of the Ohio was organized, and the Third Ohio assigned to the Third 
Division, General O. M. Mitchel commanding. 

On the 7th of December the regiment, with its division, marched for Elizabethtown, Ken 
tucky, and on the 17th of the same month went into winter-quarters at Bacon Creek, or Camp 
Jefferson, as it was styled. During its stay here it was subjected to the severest discipline, under 
the eye of General Mitchel. Some important changes occurred among the staff officers. Colo 
nel Isaac II. Marrow found it necessary to resign, which, of course, caused a regular promotion 
among the officers. 

.On the 22d of February, 18G2, in that inclement season, the Third Ohio broke camp and, 
marching by roads tramped into mire by the passage of artillery trains, entered Bowling Green 
just as the flying Rebels loft it, and reached the bank of the Tennessee River, opposite Nash 
ville, some twelve hours in advance of troops under General Nelson, who, approaching by 
water, were really the first to enter the city. 

From Nashville the Third Ohio marched southward with General Mitchel s column tin- 
distinguished Third Division. It took an active part in all the events of that stirring and brill 
iant campaign, including the capture of Murfreesboro , and the occupation of Shelbyville and 
Fayetteville, Tennessee. It was also a participant in the sudden descent of the Nationals on 
Hant;-:-ville, the pursuit down (lie railroad to Dccatur, in which was saved the splendid bridge 



30 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

across the Tennessee, and the enemy was so closely pressed through Tuscumbia to luka that the 
National morning gun could be heard by their comrades on the battle-field before Corinth. In 
the battle of Bridgeport the Third Ohio acted well its part. Led in person by the impetuous 
Mitchel, it charged and drove the enemy across the bridge. 

Then followed a long and monotonous season of " masterly inactivity," by which the greater 
part of the summer of 1862 was consumed during which the Rebels were allowed to perfect 
their preparations for a struggle compared with which all their former attempts were but child s- 
play. Huntsville continued to be the rendezvous of the regiment, and the base from which 
detachments were sent out on scouting, foraging, and other duty. 

During the month of August the Army of the Ohio was concentrating opposite and in the 
vicinity of the then Rebel stronghold of Chattanooga, and for that purpose the posts in Western 
Alabama were abandoned, and the National troops moved nearer the point where the Rebels 
were preparing to cross the river. 

In the latter part of August, 1862, it will be recollected that General Bragg, with the Rebel 
army, made a bold push toward Louisville, Kentucky, hoping thereby to compel the evacuation 
by the National armies of all their posts south of the Tennessee River, including Nashville 
itself.- On the 23d of that month, the Third Ohio, with other troops, evacuated Huntsville and 
inarched to Decherd Station. The race between Buell and Bragg had fairly opened. On the 
27th of August it became necessary that a detachment from the Third Ohio should go to Steven 
son by rail to bring off some sick men and hospital stores. In returning, the train was fired into 
by a force of Rebels, and several seriously wounded. 

The march from Decherd to Louisville was severe in the extreme. The weather was 
intensely warm, and the roads dry and covered inches thick with stifling dust. The water 
courses were dried up, and what water there was to be had was often very filthy and loathsome. 
All these disabilities, combined with scant rations, and the necessity of thus apparently aban 
doning Tennessee and Alabama, made the march one of peculiar hardship and toil to the soldier. 
Almost every day the Rebels were within striking distance, and the army eager for battle, but 
Shelbyville, Murfreesboro , and Nashville were reached and no stand made. Bowling Green 
was occupied and evacuated ; at Green River the army waited almost within sound of the battle 
in which Wilder and his gallant little band were allowed to be overpowered. Thus the north 
ward march continued until, on the morning of September 25, the Third Ohio again entered the 
city of Louisville. 

While lying at Louisville, Lieutenant Colonel J. Warren Keifer left the regiment to accept 
the position of Colonel of the One Hundred and Tenth Ohio. 

After a few days of rest the National forces again resumed their movements. The first 
encounter of any importance was at Perryville, Kentucky. In this ill-starred affair the Third 
Ohio bore an honorable part. It was in Colonel Lytle s brigade, and in the beginning of the 
action took its position in an open field on the right of the Perryville road, protected only by a 
rail fence. The Rebel attack was fierce and deadly, but notwithstanding their exposure, the 
Third stood its ground, and returned volley for volley, until more than one-third of its number 
had fallen, dead or wounded. 

In the opening of the battle, color-sergeant Wm. V. McCoubrie stood a little in advance of 
the color-guard, bearing the regimental standard proudly aloft. His exposed and marked posi 
tion instantly brought upon him a fierce fire from the enemy, and the gallant fellow was 
killed. Five others shared the same fate, until a sixth rushed forward and caught the colors ere 
they touched the ground. This last gallant hero was a beardless boy of seventeen, named David 
C. Walker, of company C, who successfully carried the flag through the remainder of the action, 
and was rewarded for his bravery by being made color-sergeant on the battle-field by Colonel 
Beatty. 

Before the close of the battle the regiment was ordered to withdraw to the second line, 
which command it executed in good order, though sorely pressed by the enemy. It remained 
in its last position until night put an end to the unequal conflict. While in line, General Rous- 



THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. 31 

seau rode up to the regiment and thanked it in the name of the army for its gallant conduct. He 
said : " You stood in, that withering fire like men of iron." The valor of the Third Ohio ia 
fully attested when it is stated that its loss in this battle was two hundred and fifteen officers and 
men killed and wounded. Among the killed were Captain McDougall, of Company A ; Captain 
E. Ctinard, of Company I ; Lieutenant J. St. John, of Company I, Aide-de-Camp to Colonel 
Lytle ; and Lieutenant Starr, of Company K. 

In the further and fruitless pursuit of Bragg s army to and beyond Crab Orchard, Ken 
tucky, the Third Ohio joined. Then, ill-clad and dispirited, the regiment and army turned 
their weary steps westward, and once more marched along the same beaten roads to Nashville, 
Tennessee. At least, the army had not lost territory, but its retention had been secured at a most 
bitter cost of valuable lives and time. 

The Third Ohio lay at New Market, Kentucky, for a time, waiting for a supply of cloth 
ing, and the camp equipage of the regiment, which had been left at Louisville. Receiving both, 
it resumed the march with buoyancy, greatly encouraged by the removal of General Buell from 
the command of the army, and the accession of General Wm. S. Rosecrans. 

On the 30th of November, 1862, the Third Ohio again entered Nashville, and went into camp 
on the south side of the city. In the meantime General Rosecrans had completely re-organized 
his army, and had placed the regiment in the Reserve Division, General Rousseau commanding. 
With the rest of the army, it remained quietly in camp until the advance upon Murfrcesboro 
was made. The battle of Stone River ensued. In this bloody affair the brigade to which the 
Third Ohio belonged was commanded by its Colonel, John Beatty, the command of the regiment 
devolving upon Lieutenant-Colonel Lawson. 

The Third occupied a position upon the right center and became engaged early in the day. 
As the right wing of the army was forced back, the center, which was partially engaged, changed 
front, to accommodate itself to the changes made on the right. Maneuvering among the thick 
cedars in the face of a vigilant enemy, was difficult, but the Third Ohio preserved its line until, 
upon reaching the edge of an open cotton field, the whole tide of battle seemed to roll down 
from the right and launch itself upon the center. It then began to give ground, stubbornly, 
delivering its fire steadily and effectively, though receiving two volleys for one. At last, orders 
came to fall back upon the new line which had been formed under cover of the artillery. In 
its new position the regiment was exposed to a galling fire, and lost heavily. During this day it 
was not again actively engaged, but during the afternoon was exposed to a heavy artillery fire. 

Early in the second day of the battle, the Third Ohio was posted on the extreme left of the 
National line, and employed in guarding a crossing of Stone River. The first day and night of 
the new year (1863) were spent at this ford. On Friday morning the regiment was relieved, 
and returned to the center just in time to receive a share of the fierce cannonade opened by the 
Rebels on that day. On Saturday morning (the 3d of January) the regiment took a position in 
the front, and its skirmish line was briskly engaged for the most part of the forenoon. In the 
afternoon the regiment was withdrawn, with others, to make preparations to charge the woods 
in front of the National center, from which the Rebel sharpshooters kept up a galling fire. The 
charge was made at dark, the Third Ohio moving down between the railroad and pike on the 
double-quick. It captured the Rebel pickets and first line of breastworks, and held the position 
under a heavy fire until it was ordered to retire. This proved to be the last of the battle of 
Stone River, as during the night the Rebel army retreated hastily on Shelbyville and Tullahoma. 

Another long interval of rest now occurred, and for three months the Third Ohio lay in camp 
at Murfreesboro , relieving the monotony of camp life in building fortifications, going on an 
occasional scout, etc. While lying here a series of promotions occurred among the officers, in 
consequence of the appointment of Colonel Beatty, (for gallant conduct at the battle of Stone 
River and other actions), to Brigadier-General of Volunteers. 

Now comes a sad epoch in the history of this regiment. Early in April, 1863, the Third was 
detached from the army proper, and in company with the Fifty-First and Seventy-Third Indiana, 
Eightieth Illinois Infantry regiments, and two companies of the First Alabama Cavalry, was 



32 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

dispatched under the command of the Colonel of the Fifty-First Indiana, on a raid into North 
ern Georgia, with the intention of destroying the iron works near Rome, in that State, as well as 
its extensive foundries and arsenals. 

On the Sth of April the Third left Murfreesboro and proceeded to Nashville ; thence by 
water down the Cumberland to Palmyra, Tennessee, where part of the expedition landed and 
scoured the country between there and Fort Henry, gathering horses and mules, while the 
remainder went around by water. At Fort Henry the command was re-united, and proceeded 
to Eastport, Mississippi. From thence it went by land to Tuscumbia, Alabama. At this point 
a great embarrassment was felt in the scarcity of horses. About two hundred men were com 
pelled to remain at Tuscumbia for that reason. Every effort was made to remedy this defect, 
but to little avail. It was the forerunner and cause of the subsequent failure of the expedition. 

On the 27th of April, 1863, the regiment left Tuscumbia for Russelville, Alabama. Being 
poorly mounted on unbroken and unshod mules, its progress was necessarily slow. No resist 
ance was met with until after having passed Russelville ; in the afternoon the advance was fired 
into by a party of Rebels who, being well mounted, made good their escape. On the 28th and 
29th the command moved through Moulton, and eastward, keeping detachments of the best 
mounted men scouring the country for horses and mules, and destroying large trains loaded with 
bacon for the Rebel army. 

On the 30th of April, while crossing Sand Mountain, the command was overtaken and 
attacked by General Roddy, in command of a large cavalry force. After a running fight of ten 
miles, the raiding party turned and gave battle. The Third Ohio was placed on the left, as a 
support to the Howitzer Battery. The Rebels dismounted, formed their lines, and opened fire, 
running their artillery within three hundred yards of the National front. A desperate fight 
ensued. 

After the Rebel force had been tested, the Colonel commanding ordered a charge, which 
w T as executed in fine style. The Third Ohio alone captured the Rebel battery of twelve pounders, 
with its caisson and ammunition, and the enemy was completely routed. The march was resumed, 
and no further trouble from Roddy s command was anticipated. The Rebel General Forrest, 
however, happened to be near at hand, and came up shortly after the fight. He at once saw his 
advantage, possessing, as he did, fresh men and animals, and commenced a vigorous pursuit with 
his combined force. Toward night, the Third Ohio being in the rear of the column, was over 
taken and attacked. A severe fight ensued, which the regiment was compelled to maintain 
against large odds for a time, but the whole National force soon came to the rescue, and again 
the enemy was badly beaten. The fight lasted until after dark, and under cover of the darkness 
the raiders again took the road, and making an ambush at the crossing of Black River, succeeded 
in checking their pursuers. Instantly taking the road again, they marched all night, reaching 
Gadsden unmolested. At this place the raiders found large stores of flour and five thousand 
stand of rifles, all of which they destroyed. 

The raiders then marched up the right bank of the Coosa River, in the direction of Rome. 
The long and harrassing marches began to tell upon their broken-down animals, and at a point 
eleven miles above Gadsden the enemy, strongly reinforced, and bent upon crushing the expe 
dition, again overtook the raiders. A third battle ensued, in which Colonel Hathaway, of the 
Seventy-Third Indiana, and his Adjutant, were killed, and the Third Ohio lost a large number 
of men. The fight w^as, as usual, continued until after dark, and again the National troops drew 
off and took the road. The prospect, however, was beginning to look very dark. Two hundred 
and fifty of the best mounted men were selected from the command, and sent forward with orders 
to enter and destroy Rome if possible, while the remainder of the command would make its way 
to the same point in the shortest possible time. 

The Rome Mountain Iron Works, one of the most extensive and valuable establishments 
of the kind in the so-called Confederacy, was reached and burned. Arrived on the banks of the 
Catoosa River, the ferry-boats could not be found, which compelled the command to go up the 
river four miles to a ford, which proved so deep that most of the ammunition became damaged, 



THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. 33 

thus placing the Nationals in a bad condition for battle. At daylight Cedar Bluff was readied. 
The morning of May 3d dawned upon a brigade of extempore troopers badly situated. Their 
horses were ridden down, their ammunition was almost completely destroyed, and the enemy, 
strongly reinforced, was dashing after them. Rome was still twenty-two miles away. Would it 
ever be reached ? 

General Forrest and his Rebel cavalry came up and immediately sent in a demand for sur 
render. The Colonel commanding refused to entertain it, but upon learning the condition of 
the ammunition, a council of war was held, the pet scheme of the commander was abandoned, 
and terms of surrender agreed upon. Thus, after a brief but gallant career, the " Provisional 
Brigade " laid down its arms, and the Third Ohio became prisoners of war. 

It was immediately marched to Rome, where the terms of the surrender were shamelessly 
violated by the Rebels, the men being searched and stripped of everything valuable, leaving 
numbers of them half naked. From Rome the regiment proceeded to Atlanta, where it 
remained a few days; thence, via Knoxville, to Richmond, Virginia, where it was quartered in 
the open air on Belle Isle, and remained there until the 15th of May, at which time the men 
were paroled, but the officers of the regiment, including the Chaplain and Surgeons, were incar 
cerated in Libby prison. 

An exchange being ordered, the Third Ohio was included in its provisions. The men 
marched to City Point, where boats had been provided, and they were taken to Annapolis, Mary 
land. After a brief stay at Annapolis, the regiment was transferred to Camp Chase, Ohio, there 
to await exchange. It remained in Ohio until August 1, 1863, engaged in quelling local trouble, 
such as the Holmes county rebellion, and other outcrops of the Rebel sympathizing element. 
The regiment also took an active part in the pursuit and capture of John Morgan and his 
Rebel raiders, being among the number that finally captured him. 

A detachment of fifty men of the Third Ohio accompanied the Twenty-Second Ohio Battery 
into Maryland during Lee s second invasion, and performed valuable service on that occasion. 

On the 1st of August, 1863, the Third Ohio received orders to report to General Gordon 
Granger, at Nashville, for duty. Reaching that place, it was again armed and equipped, and 
ordered to rejoin its old brigade, under General John Beatty, then on duty at Stevenson, Ala 
bama. Elated with the prospect of once more meeting their old companions, the regiment 
marched at once, but arrived at Stevenson too late to rejoin their command, as it had already 
crossed the Tennessee, and had marched to a point beyond Chattanooga. 

Reporting at Stevenson, the regiment was temporarily attached to the Reserve Corps, and 
with it proceeded to Bridgeport, where it guarded pontoons and escorted trains to Chattanooga 
nntil after the battle of Chickamauga, when the pontoons were raised and the south side road to 
Chattanooga abandoned. 

The Third Ohio then went to Battle Creek. Thence against Wheeler s cavalry raid, to 
Anderson s Gap, Tennessee. Thence down Sequatchie Valley to Looney Creek, where it 
remained some time, repairing the roads and facilitating the passage of trains to Chattanooga. 

On the 18th of November, 1863, the Third Ohio marched for Kelly s Ferry on the Tennes 
see River, where, being still without its officers, it remained until after the battle of Mission 
Ridge. The river being clear at Kelly s Ford, the post was abandoned, and the regiment pro 
ceeded to Chattanooga, where it performed garrison duty until the 9th of June, 1864, when it 
received orders to report at Camp Dennison, Ohio, its term of service having expired. 

The officers of the Third Ohio being retained in prison for such a length of time, no effort 
was made at the proper time to re-enlist the regiment as Veterans, and, therefore, at the end of 
their first three years term, 23d of June, 1864, the men were mustered out of service. 

After a brief visit to their homes, the great majority of the men and officers re-enlisted in 
other regiments " for the war," and performed gallant service up to the end of the strife. Many 
of them laid down their lives a willing sacrifice to their country s need. 
YOL. II. 3. 



34 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



4th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


LORIN ANDREWS 


April 26, 1801 
26, " 
" 26, " 
May 2, |) 


April 20,18 

" 26 , 
May 2, 

April 27^ 
r 20, 
" 16, 
18, 
" 19, 
" 21, 
19, 
" 27, 
21, 
22, 
27, 


>] 




Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 
Surgeon 
Ass t Surgeon 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 




H. H. MCABEE 


J. T. CAKTWELI 
James C. Irvine 
H. B. Banning 
James M. Crawford 
George Weaver 
James McMillen 


A 
.M 


l, 
aril 27, " 

20, " 
16, " 
18, " 
19, " 
21, " 
19, " 
27, " 
21, " 
22, " 
27, " 


J. S. Robinson 
E. B. Olmstead 
E. Powell 
\ II Brown 


let Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


L. W. Carpenter 
W. C. Cooper 
John S. Jones 
Gordan A Stewart 


20, " 
16, " 
IS, " 
19 " 
21, " 
19, " 
27, " 
21, " 
22, " 
27, " 
20, " 
16, " 
18, " 
19, " 
21, " 
19, " 
23, " 
1 21, " 

a :: 


16, 
18, 
19, 
21, 
" 19, 
" 27, 
" 21, 
" 22, 
" 27, 
20, 
16, 
18, 
! 19, 

1^! 

:: | 

May 20^ 


Jacob Shultz 
Percv S Sowers 


Peter Grubb 
Wm S Straub 


N W Scott 


51 J Lal ever 


F A Coates 


George Rogers 


Byron W Dolbear 


D. Timmons 
II. B. Spink 


G F. Laird 


Wm Surgeson 


J. R. Prichard 


Wm. Constant 


Wm. H. Garrett 


Richard B. Treat 



ROSTER, THBEE YEARS SERVICE 



DATE OF RANK. 



COM. ISSVED. 



Colonel 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Lt. Colonel.... 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Major 

DC 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Surgeon 

Do 

Asfi t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chaplain 

Do 

Captain 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do 



LORIN ANDREWS 

JOHN S. MASON. 



JAMES H. GODMAN 

LEO D W. CARPENTER. 

JAMF.S CANT WELL , 

JAMES II. GODMAN , 

LEONARD W. CARPENTER.... 

GORDON A. STEWART 

FRANK J. SPALTER 

CHARLES C. CALLAHAN 

SEWEI.L W. DEWITT 

JAMES H. GODMAN , 

GEORGE WEAVER 

LEONARD W. CARPENTER..., 

GORDON A. STEWART 

PETER GRUBB 

FRANK J. SPALTER 

II. H. McAnEE. 



T. W. MORRISON 

ALBERT LONGWELL... 

T. W. MORRISON 

JOHN B. LAIRD 

W. D. WILSON 

BARZELLIA GRAY 

LORENZO WARNER 

DANIEL G. STRONG.... 

L. W. Carpenter 

H. B. Banning 

Uamea M. Crawford.. 

[George Weaver 

James McMillen 

iJanies Wallace 

U. S. Robinson 

IP!. B. Olmstead 

j Eugene Powell 

lA. H. Brown 

Gordon A. Stewart... 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Peter Grubb. 
William Constant. 
Foster A. Coat* 



June 
Oct. 
Nov. 
July 
Juno 
Jan. 
Nov. 
July 
Aug. 
Dec. 
May 
June 
Jan. 
Nov. 

July 
J tine 



July 

Nov. 

Jan. 

April 

June 

March 

June 



Jan. 



5, 1861 

3, " 
29, 1862 

28, 1863 
5, 1861 
9, 1862 

29, " 

28, 1863 

29, 1864 
9, " 

31, 1865 

5, 1861 
9, 1862 

6, " 
29, " 

28, 18G3 
25, 1864 

16, 1863 

21. 18(5! 
31, 186 

29, " 
15, 1864 

22, " 
IS, 1861 
25, 1863 

4, 1861 
4, " 
4, 

4, 
t, 
1, 
4, 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
9, 1862 
9, " 



2 .1 



John S. Jones 

George F. Laird 

Jaiues Ferguson.... 

John Green 

William S. Straub.. 



Tune 11, 



Nov. 
June 
I Aug. 



July 

Oct. 

April 

Aug. 

June 

Jan. 

April 

Aug. 

Dec. 
May 
June 
Jan. 
Dec. 
\pril 
Aug. 
July 

Nov. 
Aug. 
ily 
Feb. 
Jan. 
April 
Aug. 
May 
June 



Ian. 

Sept. 
Dec. 



1863] Promoted to Colonel. 

" Mustered out as Major Jul 
186) Remained in command of 



1861 Died Oct. 4, 1801. _ [Nov. 29, 1862 

" Appointed Brigadier-General by President, 
1863 Honorably discharged July 28, 1863. 

" Mustered out. 

1861! Appointed Colonel 82d Regiment 0. V. I. 
18621 Promoted to Colonel November 29, 1862. 

[tained. 

ly 28, 1863, to be re- 
Fourth Battalion. 
[ary 28, 1865. 
1ST).") Absent from regiment with leave since Jann- 

1861 Promoted to Lieurenant-Colonel Jan. 9, 1862. 

1862 Resigned November 6, 1862. 

" (Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 

1863 Mustered out. [Captain. 
" Mustered out July 28. 1863, to be retained aa 

1864! Killed at battle, of Wilderness, 1864. 

I Honorably discharged, September 16, 1863. 
18631 Mustered out. 
1861 Resign _(! October 27, 1862. 
1862 Promoted to Surgeon. 

1863 Resigned July II, 1864. 

1864 Commission returned. 
Mnstcied out with regiment. 

1861 Resigned March 17, 1863. 
ls63 Musteivd out. 



L861 



Promoted November 6, 1862, to Captain. 

Appointed Colonel 87th Rejjim t, June 25, 1862. 

Honorably discharged, August 31, 1862. 

Promoted January 9, 1862, to Major. 

Deceased . 

Died January 6. 1863. 

Appointed Major 82d Regiment 0. V. I, 



Ippoi 

ToIlO 



ably discharged October 17. 1862. 



Appointed Major 66rh Regiment 6. V. I. * 
Resigned June II, 1862. 
18f2 Promoted November 29, 1862, to Major. 
Mustered rut. 

Resigned November 22, 1862. [Oct. 15, 1862. 

Honorably discharged as First Lieutenant, 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Deceased. 

Promoted by the President April 17, 1863. 
Mustered out. 



FOUETII OHIO INFANTRY. 



35 



RANK. 

Captain 


NAMK. 


DATE OF RANK 


COM. 1 


SSUF.D. 


REMARKS. 


Daniel Tinimons 


Oct. 17, 1862 


Dec. 


26, 1862 


Mustered out. 


, I) 


Bvrou W. D<dhear 


" fi, " 
Tan. HI, 1803 
April 29, " 
March 1, " 
April 1, " 
1, " 
Juno 4, 1864 


Jan. 

Feb. 

May 
June 


20, 1803 
10, " 
18, | 

2.% " 

17, " 
2. r ), 1S04 


Deceased. 

Mustered out. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Died in prison. 
1 romoted. 


D: ::: : 

Do 


Samuel I;. Brearlev 
William Wallace 


I). 

I>O 


Willi un M Camp 


.1 1! ]>.-irli!ir(l . 


Do! !!!! Byi-on W. Evans 
Do Charles 0. Calahan 
T),, Scwoll W. Dt-witl 


Do George C. Denniston 
Do Lewis Rounds 


25, " 

Dec. 9, " 
Mrtrch 29, 1805 
May 31, " 
31, " 
June 4, 1861 
4. " 


Dec. 
March 
May 

Juno 


25, " 
9, " 
29, 1805 
31, " 
31, " 
4, 1801 
4, " 


Mustered out March 2, 1865. 
Mustered out July 12, 1665. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. [Oct. 15, 18f>2. 
Promoted June 11, 1802; honorably discharged 
Promoted June 11, 1802, to Captain. 


Do 


Lucian P Abbott 


Do 


Jeremiah J. Garman 


1st Lieutenant 

K: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

ft 


John Green 


Gordon A. Stewart 


4, " 

4, " 

" 1, " 
4, " 


4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 


Promoted January 9, 1802, to Captain. 
Resigned June 21, 1802. 
Promoted June 29, 1802. 
Promoted January 9, 1S62. 


Jacob Sim It 7. 


G. V. Laird 


Peter Grubb 


w in. S. Straub 
William Constant 
Bradford R\ Durlcc 
Win II G-irrett 


" 4, " 
" 4, " 
A nor. 9, " 
Ian. 9, 1802 

it q " 


Aug. 
Jan. 


4, " 
4, " 
9, " 
9, 1802 
9, " 
9, " 

X " 

9, " 
12, " 
12, " 

12, " 


Promoted January 9, 1802. r O. V. I. 
Appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of 82d regiment 
Resigned December 7, 1802. 
Promoted October 17, 1802. 
Resigned April 29 H03 


)aniel Tinr.nons 


Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2cl Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


A. \V. Lippett 


" 9, " 
" 9, " 
June 21, " 

31, " 


Se t pt. 


Died December 26, 1862! 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted Nov. 0, 1802. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 


Bvron W. l ( >n>. !ir 
William M. Camp 
Samuel L. Brearley 
George Letter 


Reason Beall Spink 
J. 11. Priehard 
Wil.iam T. Patton 
Theodore H. Pickerson 


Nov. 22, " 
Tune 11, " 
Aug. 31, " 
Oct. 17, " 


Dec. 


11, " 

2li " 

20, 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
10, 1803 
10, " 
10, " 
20, 
18, 
28, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
25, 1804 


Resigned March 23, 18G3. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
IIoiKn-ablv discharged August 12, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Honorably discharged Novembers, 1SG3. 
Mustered out. 
Honorably discharged November 28, 18G3. 

Mustered out. 
Commission revoked. 
Made Major of Fourth Battalion. 
Killed August 25 1804. 


William Welch 


Dec. 7 
Dec. 20, 
Nov. 6, 
Jan. 7, 1 03 
March 24, 
Jan. 10, 
April 29, 
March 1, 
April 1, 
Jan. 1, 
June 7, 1804 


Feb. 

July 
May 

July 


Byron Thomas 


William Wallace 


Joseph II Carr 




George Orville Hill 


C. L. Pcttibone 


George Brophv 


John Dunlap 
Frank J. Spalter 
George W. Cruikshank 


Frank It. Sailer 
Hanson E. Braman 
Asa T. Freeman 
Lucian P. Abbott 
Jeremiah J. Garman 
Hiram Lvnn 
Gerrard Welch 
John W. Hcndershott 


|| 25, || 

Aug. 9, " 
Sept. 8, " 
Nov. 3, " 
Jan. 18, 1SO;> 
May 31, " 
June 6, " 
" 4, 1801 
" 4, " 
4, " 
" 4, " 
4, " 
4, " 


&: 

Nov. 
Jan. 
May 
June 
Juno 


9, " 
8, " 
3, " 
18, 1S05 
31, " 
0, " 
4, " 
4, " 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
9, 
9, 


Declined promotion ; mustered out. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned. 

Promoted January 9, 02, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted January 9, 02, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted January 9, 02, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted January 9, ti2, to First Lieutenant. 
Resigned June 21, 1802. 
Promoted June 11, 1802, to First Lieutenant. 


A W Lippett 


Byron W. Dolbear 
Daniel Timmons 


Henry Cutter 


Samuel L. Brearley 


J. R. Prichard 
James Ferguson 
Wm. H. Garrett 
William M. Camp 
Algernon Gilliam 
Lemuel Jeffries 
Isaiah Lnrkins 
William T. Patten 


" 4] " 
4, " 
" 4, " 
Aug. 9, " 
9, " 
Dec. 20, " 
Jan. 9, 1802 
" 9, " 
" 9, " 
" 9, " 
June 11, " 
13, " 
21, 
" 2"), 


Aug. 


Promoted June; 11, 1802, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted January 9, 02, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted August *), 1861, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted June 21, 1802, to First Lieutenant. 
Resigned Juno 21, 1802. 


Jan. 

Sept. 


9, 1802 
9, " 
i) , " 
12, " 

!?; :: 

12, " 


Resigned October 31, 1802. 
Promoted August 31, 02, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted October 17, 02, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Nov. (i, 02, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Dec. 7, 18S2, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Dec. 20, 1802, to First Lieutenant. 
Killed December 13, 1*02. 
Promoted Nov. 22, 1802, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Nov. 0, 1802, to First Lieutenant. 


Theodore II. Diekerson 


William Welch. 


Bvron Thomas 


William Brighton 


Reason Beall Spink 
William Wallace 


29, 
" 21, 


" 12, " 


Andrew M. Anderson 
Joseph II Carr 


Oct. 3? 
June 11, 
Aug. 31, 


Feb. 


20, " 
31, " 

10, 18 \ 


Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Jan. 7, lNi3, to First Lieutenant. 
Killed July 3, I803. 


Samuel J. Shoub 


Frank J. Spaifr 


Nov. 0, 
Dec. 7, 
26, 

Nov " 


Feb. 
March 

April 
May 

July 

Aug. 
Jan. 


31, 
31, 
10, 18 3 
30, 
30, 
29, 

": : 

28, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
25, 
20, 


Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Resigned. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Killed Julv 2, 1803. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 

Transferred from 8th 0. V. I.; promoted. 


Georire Orvil e Hill 


Job n Dun ap 


William F. Lvnch 


Jan. 7, " 
Dec. 13, " 
June 10, 1803 
March 29, " 
April 29, " 
March 24, " 
Jan. 1, " 
March 1, " 
April 1, " 
Jan. 20, " 


William A. MeDermott.... 
John It. Kimpp.jr 
Addison II. Edgar 
John G. Evans 
William W. Williams 
Joseph Walking 


Albert H. Perrv 


Joseph L. Dickleman 
Lucian Abbott 



36 OHIO IN THE WAR. 



FOURTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE FOURTH OHIO was organized at Camp Jackson, Columbus, on the 25th 
day of April, 1861, and, acting under the old militia law of the State, the men pro 
ceeded to choose their officers by ballot. Lorin Andrews, the well-known and highly- 
honored President of Kenyon College, who had volunteered as a private, (and who was among 
the first prominent citizens of the State who hastened to tender their services to the Govern 
ment in any capacity in which they might be needed), thus became the Colonel of the regiment. 
Its ranks were filled by two companies from Mount Vernon, two from Delaware, two from Ken- 
ton, two from Marion, one from Canton, and one from Wooster. 

On the 2d of May the regiment moved to Camp Dennison, and on the 4th of the same 
month was mustered into the three months service by Captain Gordon Granger, United States 
Army. A few days thereafter the President s call for three years men was made public, where 
upon the majority of the regiment signified their willingness to enter the service for that period, 
and it was mustered in for three years, dating from the 5th of June, 1861. 

On the 20th of June the regiment left Camp Dennison for Western Virginia, arriving at 
Grafton on the 23d. Moving through Clarksburg and Buckhannon, it arrived at Rich Mountain 
on the 9th of July, but did not participate actively in that engagement, being held as a support 
for the skirmishers. On the 12th of July the regiment joined in the pursuit of the enemy, 
going to Beverly, Virginia, where it went into camp and rested for a day. On the 13th, six 
companies of the regiment, under Colonel Andrews, moved with the main column of General 
McClellan s forces to Huttonsville. The other four companies, under Lieutenant-Colonel Cant- 
well, remained at Beverly, in charge of six hundred Rebel prisoners until they were paroled. 
On the 14th the six companies moved to the summit of Cheat Mountain, but on the 16th returned 
to Beverly, where they remained until the 23d, when they took the cars for New Creek, arriving 
there July 28. On the 7th of August they marched to Pendleton, Maryland. 

On the 7th of September three companies of the regiment, A, F, and K, under Major J. II. 
Godman, had a skirmish with the Rebels at Petersburg, Virginia, and captured a large quantity 
of provisions, animals, and some prisoners, and brought the results of their enterprise back to 
Pendleton. Lieutenant-Colonel Cantwell, with six companies of the regiment, moved on 
Romney, leaving Pendleton on the 24th of September, and, after a brisk engagement, drove 
the Rebels from that place. The loss of the regiment in this action was thirty-two men 
wounded. 

Colonel Andrews having died at his home in Gambier, Ohio, of camp fever, on the 4th of 
October his successor was appointed in the person of John S. Mason, a Captain in the United 
States Regular Infantry. Colonel Mason assumed command on the 14th of October. 

On the 25th of October the regiment marched to New Creek, Virginia, where it joined Gen 
eral Kelly s command, and on the next day moved on Romney. The Rebels were again driven 
from that place, all his baggage, two pieces of artillery, and a number of prisoners captured. 
Romney was occupied until January 7, 1862, when the regiment under Colonel Mason moved on 
the Rebels at Blue Gap, sixteen miles from Romney, surprised and drove them from a fortified 
position, capturing all the camp equipage and two pieces of artillery. 

Romney was evacuated on the 10th of January, and the regiment transferred to Patterson s 



FOURTH OHIO INFANTRY. 37 

Creek, on the north branch of the Potomac ; and thence, on February 9, to Pawpaw Tunnel on 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. On the 1st of March the regiment moved toward Winchester, 
under Brigadier-General Lander, but hearing of his death the next day, it returned to Pawpaw 
Tunnel, and remained there until the 7th of March. On that day it took the cars for Mar- 
tinsburg, and arrived there on the 9th. On the llth it moved toward Winchester, to find on its 
arrival that the enemy had evacuated the place on the day previous. 

Making Winchester its base, detachments from the regiment were sent out in different direc 
tions, until the night of the 23d of March, when the regiment was re-assembled at Win 
chester, and on the 24th it started in pursuit of StoncAvall Jackson, who had been defeated at 
Kernstown the day previous. The enemy was pursued as far as Strasburg, where the regiment 
remained until the night of the 30th of March: It then moved to Edenburg, in the Valley. 
On the 17th of April the regiment again moved to New Market, skirmishing by the way. On 
the 27th it moved to Moor s farm, five miles from Harrisonburg, where it remained in camp 
until the 5th of May, when it again returned to New Market. 

On the 12th of May the Fourth Ohio Infantry marched via Luray, Front Royal, Chester 
Gap, Warrenton, and Catlett s Station, for Fredericksburg, Virginia, to join McDowell s Corps, 
arriving there on the 22d of May. The next day the regiment was ordered back to the Valley 
via Manassas Junction. It reached Front Royal on the 30th, drove the enemy from that place, 
and captured a large quantity of ammunition, supplies, and a number of prisoners. On the 3d 
of June it moved toward Luray, and reached that place on the 7th. From Luray a forced march 
was made by the brigade for Port Republic, reaching there in time to cover the retreat of the 
National forces. 

After marching and counter-marching around Luray and Front Royal until the 29th of 
June, the regiment went by rail to Alexandria, from whence they embarked for the Peninsula, 
arriving at Harrison s Landing on the 1st of July. It remained at this Point until the 15th of 
August, and was the last regiment to leave Harrison s Landing on its evacuation by the Army 
of the Potomac. It marched via Charles City C. II., W r illiamsburg, and Yorktown to Newport 
News, and on the 24th of August embarked for Aquia Creek and Alexandria, reaching the latter 
place on the 27th of August. On the 29th the regiment marched to Centerville, and on the 1st 
of September returned to Fairfax C. H. On the 2d it marched to Fort Gaines, District of 
Columbia, and from thence to Harper s Ferry via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. On the 1st 
of October the regiment marched to Leesburg via Waterford, returning to Harper s Ferry on 
the 2d. On the 4th it marched to Halltown, coming back to Harper s Ferry on the 6th. Octo 
ber 30th the regiment broke camp and crossed the Shenandoah ; November 1st marched to Greg 
ory s Gap ; thence through Smucker s and Ashby s Gap to Rectortown and Piedmont ; thence to 
Salem, Warrenton, and Falmouth, Virginia, where it remained in camp until the 12th of 
December, at which time, under command of Colonel Mason, it crossed the Rapidan into Fred 
ericksburg, and was thrown to the front as skirmishers, and held that position until the next 
day, 13th of December, when the desperate charge was made through the streets of Fredericks- 
burg. It received the first fire of the Rebel artillery on the right of the National line. TKe 
loss of the Fourth Ohio in this disastrous affair was very severe ; five officers and forty-three 
enlisted men, out of one hundred and fifteen engaged, were either killed or wounded. The regi 
ment crossed the river in the night, with the rest of the National forces, and went into its old 
camp near Falmouth. 

Colonel Mason was made Brigadier-General for his conduct at Fredericksburg. 

The regiment continued in camp at Falmouth until the 28th of April, when it participated 
in Hooker s remarkable movement on Chancellorsville. On the 3d of May the battery engaged 
the enemy, and captured one stand of colors and over one hundred prisoners, among whom were 
nine commissioned officers. It lost in killed and wounded, seventy-eight out of three hundred 
and fifty-two engaged. On the 6th of May the regiment moved back to their old camp at 
Falmouth. 

On the 14th of June the line of march was resumed toward Pennsylvania, in consequence 



38 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

of the Kebel army under Lee having invaded that State. Gainesville, Virginia, was reached 
on the 20th, where a halt was made until the 25th. The next day the Potomac was crossed 
at Edward s Ferry, and passing through Frederick, Uniontown was reached on the 29th, and 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the 1st of July, where the regiment took part in that great 
battle. It was one of the three regiments that drove the Rebels from Cemetery Hill, after they 
had driven a part of the Eleventh Corps from the lield, and had gained possession of two of our 
batteries. Generals Hancock, Howard, Gibbon, and other prominent Generals witnessed this 
charge, and gave it their highest commendation. The Fourth Ohio lost in this engagement three 
commissioned officers and thirty-four enlisted men killed and wounded. 

After the battle the regiment, with its brigade And division, marched in pursuit of the flying 
Rebels, passing through Frederick City ; and thence, through Crampton s Gap of the South 
Mountain, crossing the Potomac River at Harper s Ferry, July 18th, marching through 
Smacker s Gap, Woodbury, Bloomfield, and Upperville, to Markham and Manassas Gap ; 
thence to Salem and White Plains, Warrenton Junction, Elk Run, Kelly s Ford on the Rappa- 
hannock, returning to Elk Run on the 1st of August. Here it remained until the 16th of 
August, and then moved to Bealton Station, and took cars for Alexandria, Virginia, On the 
20 h of August the regiment embarked for New York, arriving in that city on the 23d. The 
riotous spirit prevailing there having subsided, the troops were removed, and on the 26th of 
August the Fourth Ohio moved to Jamaica, Long Island, near the city, in order that they might 
be on hand in case of further outbreak. 

On the 6th of September the regiment took passage at New York City for Alexandria, Vir 
ginia, arriving there on the llth. Again a series of marches commenced, embracing Fairfax 
C. H., Bristoe Station, Bealton, Brandy Station, Cedar Mountain, and Robinson s Run, arriv 
ing at the last named place on the 17th of September, and remaining until October 6th. It 
then moved to Culpepper C. H. ; thence to Bealton Station ; thence to Auburn ; thence to Bris 
toe Station, where it had a skirmish with the enemy. After this another series of marches in a 
circle was gone through with, until, on the 26th of September, the regiment crossed the Rapidan 
at Gennania Ford, and on the 27th, at Robinson s Cross Roads, it had a brisk skirmish with the 
enemy, with a loss of twenty-eight men killed and wounded. On the 1st of December the regi 
ment went into winter-quarters near Stevensburg, Virginia. 

On the 6th of February the regiment moved to Morton s Ford, on the Rapidan, crossed the 
river, had a skirmish with the enemy, and lost seventeen men wounded. Recrossed the river 
on the 7th, and returned to camp near Stevensburg, Virginia, where it remained until the latter 
part of August. It then moved with the forces of General Grant, participating in the skir 
mishes and engagements of that arduous campaign, until in the early part of September, the 
term of enlistment of the main part of the regiment having expired, it was mustered out of the 
service as a regiment. Those who had re-enlisted as veterans were retained and organized into 
a battalion, called the Fourth Ohio Battalion. This remainder of the Fourth was placed on 
duty in and around Washington City, and continued in that locality until the final muster out 
during the closing scenes of the war. 

The movements of the regiment have thus been briefly noted. A few points, bearing on its 
relations to other regiments and to commanding officers may be added. 

The Fourth was first brigaded with the Ninth Ohio, and How s Battery, Fourth United 
Slates Artillery, July, 1861, Colonel Robt. McCook commanding. This brigade was General 
McClellan s advance guard during his Western Virginia campaign. In January, 1862, a new 
brigade was formed, consisting of the Fourth and Eighth Ohio Infantry, Clark s Battery 
Fourth United States Artillery, Dnmm s First Virginia Battery, Robinson s and Huntington s 
First Ohio Batteries, known as the Artillery Brigade of Lander s Division, commanded by Colo 
nel J. S. Mason. After General Lander s death, in March, 1862, General Shields assumed 
command of the Division. When the division was reorganized, the Fourth and Eighth Ohio, 
Fourteenth Indiana, and Seventh Virginia Volunteers constituted the First Brigade of Shield ** 
Division, Colonel N. Kimball of the Fourteenth Indiana comm mdin<*. 



FOURTH OHIO INFANTRY, 39 

General Shields was relieved from his command in June, 18(12, and Kimball s Brigade 
ordered to join the Army of the Potomac, then on the Peninsula. After arriving there, it was 
.assigned to the Second Army Corps as an independent brigade. In September, 1862, the Third 
Division of the Second Army Corps was organized under General French, of which General 
Kimball s brigade constituted the First Brigade. General Kimball retained command until he 
was wounded at Fredericksburg. Colonel Mason, of the Fourth, succeeded him. General 
Mason was relieved in January, 1863, when Colonel Brooks, of the Fifty-Third Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, was assigned. In April, 1863, Colonel S. S. Carroll, of the Eighth Ohio, relieved 
Colonel Brooks, and retained command of the brigade up to its muster out. 

The Fourth Ohio Infantry marched one thousand nine hundred and seventy-five miles, and 
traveled by railroad and transport two thousand two hundred and seventy-nine miles, making 
an aggregate of four thousand two hundred and fifty-four miles traveled. Throughout its career 
the Fourth maintained its reputation for discipline, efficiency in drill, and good conduct on 
the field of battle. 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



5th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY * 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 








REMARKS. 








Colonel 
Do 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


SAMUEL II. DUNNING... 
JOHN H PATRICK 


Juno 
Aug. 
July 
June 
Aug. 
Jan. 

Sept. 
July 

June 
Feb. 
June 
Aug. 
March 
Feb. 
July- 
June 
Aug. 


11. 1861 
2, 1862 
20, 1*<)5 
11, 1861 
2, 1862 
8, 1863 
8, " 
26, 1864 
20, 1865 
11, 1861 
S, 1862 
4, " 
2, " 
1".), 1863 
23, lS6:i 
20, " 
11, 1861 
26, 1864 
3 1861 


July 

Sept. 
July 

Sept. 
Jan. - 
April 
Sept. 
July 

Feb. 
June 
Sept. 
April 
Feb. 
July 
Oct. 
Aug. 

July 
Feb. 
Nov. 
Aug. 
July 

Sept. 
Jan. 
March 

k? 

June 
July 

Oct. 

Dec. 
Feb. 
April 

Aug. 

March 

May 

Sept. 
Feb. 

May 

June 

July 


15, 1S61 
1, 1862 
20, 1865 
15, 1861 
1, 1862 
19, 1863 
8, " 
26, 1864 
20, 1865 
15, 1861 
8, 1862 
5, " 
1, " 
8, 1863 
23, 1865 
20, " 
23, 1861 
26, 1864 
3, 1861 
23, 1862 
10, 1863 
3, 1864 
31, 1861 
15, 1861 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
28, " 
9, 1862 
20, " 
23, || 

2\\ " 
31, " 
15, " 
15. " 
26, " 
17, 1863 
8, " 
8, " 
8, " 
25, " 

25^ " 
25, " 
25, " 
3, 1864 
10, " 
10, " 
10, " 
9, " 
9, " 
25, " 
26, " 
23, 1865 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
11, " 
11, " 
16, " 
20, " 
20, " 
15, 1861 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
24, " 


Resigned August 2, 1862. 
Killed. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Colonel August 2, 1862. 
Mustered out by order of War Dep. Jan. 8, "63. 
Reinstated ; revoked Feb. 17, 63, S. 0.71.W.D. 
Honorably discharged August 17, 1864. 
Promcted to Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned January 27, 1862. 
Resigned. [promoted. 
Recommissioned by order War Department; 
Resigned March 29, 1863. 
Deceased ; wounds received in battle. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Dismissed Sept 10, 1862. 
Resigned September 27, 1864. 
Resigned October 15, 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out. 
Commissioned by the President of U. S. 
Resigned May 26, 1862. 
Resigned August 21, 1861. 
Killed at Winchester, Va., March 23, 1862. 
Promoted August 2, 1862, to Major. 
Resigned December 5, 1862. 
It-signed April 26, 1862. 
Dismissed April 27, 1863. 
Promoted Jan. 8, 1863, to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted March 29, 1863, to Major. 
Resigned November 15, 1861. 
Void ; having resigned before appointed. 
Honorably discharged January 23, 1863. 
Resigned July 23, 1862. 
Resigned March 29, 1863. 
Mustered out August 13, 1862. 
Resigned April 30, 1864. 
Resigned April 4, 1864. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Deceased. 
Commission returned. 
Mustered out. 
Died Mav 24, 1863. 
Resigned May 23, 1863. 
Resigned July 5, 1864. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned January 30, 1864. 
Resigned February 27, 1864. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned April 9, 1865. 

Deserted ; dismissed. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Returned commission ; declined promotion. 
Cashiered July 19, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Died of diarrhea September 28, 1864. 
Mustered out with regimen . 
Mustered out with regimen . 
Mustered out with regimen . 
Mustered out with regimen . 
Mustered out with regimen ;. 
Resigned Januarv 22, 1862. 
designed March 11, 1862. 
Promoted September 14, 1861. to Captain. 
Promoted April 26, 1862, to Captain. 
Resigned March 11, 1862. 
Transferred to Invalid Corps June 16, 1863. 


ROBERT KIRKUP 
JOHN H PATRICK 


HARRY G. ARMSTRONG 
HARRY G. ARMSTRONG 
R. L. KILPATRICK 
ROBERT KIRKUP 


WlLLI\M G VSKILL 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. . 


HAHRY G. ARMSTRONG 
HARRY G. ARMSTRONG 
JOHN COLLINS 
HENRY E. SYMMES 
KRFWSON YERKES 


Do 
Do 


JOSEPH PLAISTED 
\ BALL 




Do 


\ E JENNER 


Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


CURTIS J. BELLOWS 


\\ ILLIAM F. TlIiBALS 

0. G. FIELD 

J D JUNKIN 


Inn. 
Nov. 
June 
May 
June 

Sept. 
Jan. 
March 
April 

May 
luly 

Aug. 

Dec. 
Jan. 
May 
Jan. 
March 
May 

March 

May 

^ept. 
Feb. 

May 

Tune 
July 

May 
June 


6, 1863 
3, 1 .4 
11, 1 61 
28, 1 il 
4, 

6 
6. 

8^ " 
8, " 
11, " 
14, " 
9, 1362 
IP, 
22, " 
26, " 
26, 

3l , " 
2, " 
5, " 
23, 1863 
20, 1862 
8, 1863 
29, " 
23, " 
24, " 
25, " 
26, " 
27, " 
3, 1864 
10, " 
!(), " 
10, " 
9, " 
9, " 
2:), " 
2(i, " 
23, 1865 
2.3, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
11, " 
H, 
16, 
20, 
20, 
28, ISfl 
4, 
5, 
C>, 
6. " 
6, " 


S L. YoURTEE 




Thcophilu-i G nines 


Do 


Robert M. Havs 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Alonzo C. Horton 
George B. Whitcom 


Charles H. Jackson 
Jacob A Remlev 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


John F. Fletcher 


R. L. Kilpatrick 
Henrv E. Svnunes 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


Waldo C. Bootli 


Frederick W. Moore 
Theophilus A. Startznian. 
Frederick W. Moore 
Lewis C. Robinson 
Thomas W. Henerman 
Jacob A Remlev 


Do 
Do. 


J. D. McDonald 
Robert Kirkup 


Do. 




Do 
Do. 


Thomas W. Henerman 
VustinJ Shirer 


Do. 


William M. Dick 

William V \eek-v 


Do. 


Do 
Do. 


II. Egbert Fisher 


Do 




Do 
Do. 


Benjamin Jelleff, jr 


Do 
Do 


John M. Paver 
William II Thomas.. .. 


Do 
Do. 


Edward R. Anthony 


Do. 


Charles Friedeborn 


Do 
Do. 


Stephen Coddington 
Hiram R Treher 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

I>0 

Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Joseph Plaisted 
Wilson B.Gaither 
Henry C. Koogle 
Jeremiah Robinson 
Alexander Mott 
Morton Bar ringer 
Henrv A. Fortman 
Thomas W. Scott 


Henry C. Koogle 
Herman Belmcr 
Joseph L. Gaul 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Robert B. Bromwell 
Robert S. Loan 


Waldo C. Booth 
Lewis C. Robinson 

Joseph Rudolph 


C. C. Whitson 


George N. C. Fra/Jer 
George II. Whitcamp 
f. C. McDonald 
T. G. Swartzman 
Krederick W.Moore 
Robert Kirkup 
Dolin F. MeKenzie 


Sept. 
Jan. 


8, 
8, 
11, 
H, 
4, 
9, 1862 
9. " 


> 

Sept. 
Ian. 


15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
28, " 
9, 1862 
9, " 


Resigned December 27, 1861. 
Resigned April 26, 1862. 
Promcted August 13, 1862, to Captain. 
Promoted March 19, 1862, to Captain. [1862. 
lles d Jan. 2, 62 ; disability removed March 13. 
Promoted Ausust 2, 1862, to Captain. 
Resigned October 3, 13ci2. 



1 Tho Roster of three months service is not on record. 



FIFTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



41 



HANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF IIANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


RF.MABKS. 


let Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

BS: 

Do. 
Do. 


James Kinkaid 
Charles W. Smith 
\Viu. M. Dick 
Wm. M. Neelv 
Hugh Marshall 
Austin J.Shirer 
John M. Paver 
James Timmons 
R. Egbert Fisher 
Alexander L. Little 
George Sharp 


Jan. 22, 1862 
Feb. 8, " 
March 19, " 
11, " 
11, " 
April 26, " 
" 26, " 
May 26, " 
June 9, " 
Aug. 13, " 
2, " 
Oct. 3, " 
Dec. 5, " 
Feb. 11, 1S63 
Jan. 8, " 
May 29, " 
29, " 
April 4, " 
Jan. 3, " 
May 23, || 

" 25 1 " 

" 2r> " 

27 " 

March 3, 1864 
3, " 
3, " 


March 20, 1862 
20, 
" 20, 
May 1 
1, 
29, 
" 29, 
June 24, 
July 10, 
Oct. 15, 
15, 
Dec. 26, 
26, 
Feb. 25, 1 63 
April 8, 
8, 
8, 
Jan. 10, 
Aug. 25, 
25, 
" 25, 
" 25, 
1 25, 
25, 
25, 
March 3, 1 64 
3, 
3, 
3, 
" 10, 
" 10, 
" 10, 
May 9, 
!! 25, 

" 25 1 , 
Feb. 23, 1 fa 
" 23, 
23, 
" 23, 
" 23, 
" 23, 
" 23, 
" 23, 
" 23, 
May 11, 
11, 
July 20, 

- I 1 !: 

20, 


Promoted December 5, 1862, to Captain. 
Resigned January 9, 1862. 
Promoted January 8, 1863, to Captain. 
Promoted March 29, 1863, to Captain. 
Resigned February 11, 1863. 
Promoted May 29, 1802, to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned April 7, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned April 4, 1803. 
Ivesigned. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Died Mav3, 1863. 
Mustered out June 28, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Deceased Julv 3, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned January 31, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Deserted; dismissed. 
Resigned April 4, 1804. 
Resigned. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned July 13, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Declined; commission returned. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Cashiered July 17, 18C5. 
Discharged. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Musteied out with regiment. 
Promoted Jan. 22, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted January 9, 62, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Sept. 4, 1861, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted March 19_, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to majority. 
Promoted Feb. 8, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted March 11, It62, to First Lieutenant. 
Resigned. 
Promoted March 11, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted April 26, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted April 26, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Resigned May 26, 1862. 
Promoted May 26, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Resigned Julv 9, 1862. 
Promoted August 13, 62, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted June 9, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted August 2, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Killed June 9, 1862. 
Promoted Oct. 3, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Dec. 5, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted Feb. 11, 63, to First Lieutenant. 


Fredc.ri.-k Fairfax 
Win. II. Thomns 


Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

8S: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 




Ben-amin Je Iefi jr 


Fd\virrl R Antlionv 


.James L. Thompson 




Stephon Corlrlincton 
Hiram R Trolier 






Edward L.Quinton 


Joseph Plaisted 
John B. Heal 


Henry ( . Koosile 


" 3, " 
" 10, " 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
3d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do! 
Do. 
Du 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do! 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do! 
Do. 


\le\ander Mott 


" 10, " 
May 9, 

Feb. 23* 1865 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
" 23, " 
" 23; " 
23, " 


Edward L. Quinton 


Martin Barringer 
Henrv A. Fortman 
Thomas W. Scott 
Charles B. Jacobs 
Herman Belmer 
Joseph L. Gaul 
Peter A. Cozine 


George Heintzelberger 
Joseph Grunkeyrneyer 
Albert M. Towsley 
Stephen Hosier 


Herman Strickler 


Matthias Schwab... . 


11, " 
July 20, " 
" 20, " 
" 20, " 

20, " 


James Hi die v 


Michael \\ ard 
Andrew J. Barr 
Christian Knauft 


Benjamin K. Ford 
James Kinkaid 


" 20, " 
May 28, 1801 
June 4, " 
" 5. " 

" 5, " 
" C, " 
" 6, " 
" 7, " 
8, " 


20, 
" 15, 1 fl 
15, 
15, 
15, 
" 15, 
15, 
" 15, 
" 15, 


Robert Kirk up 


Frederick W. Moore 
William M. Dick 
IIarrv G. Armstrong 


Charles W. Smith 
William M. Neely 
Robert H. Barrett 


John M. Paver 


111 " 
Sept. 7, " 
24, " 
28, " 
Jan. 9, 1S62 

Feb. 8 , " 
March 19, " 
11, " 
" 11, " 
April 26, " 
26, " 
Hav 26, " 
July 10, " 
10, " 
June 9, " 
Aug. 9, | 

13"! " 
Oct. 3, " 
Dec. 5, " 
" 29, " 
Jan. 20, 1863 


15, 
Se^t. 16. 

" 2s! 
Jan. 9, 1 1 
March 20, 
20, 
20, 
May 29, 
" 29, 
" 29, 
" 29, 
June 24, 
July 10, 
10, 
10, 
Sept. 9, 
Oct. 15, 

Dec. 23*, 
" 26, 
Jan. 20, 1 .3 

20, 


Austin J. Shiror 
Augustus J. Moonert 


P. M. McCann 
Alexander L. Little 
II. Egbert Fisher 




Krewson Yerkcs 
Frederick Fairfax 




William II. Thomas 




Promoted March 29, 1*63, to First Lieutenant. 
Resigned June 11, 1863. 
Failed to report. 
Killed December 29, 1862. 
Promoted March 29, 1863, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Deceased May 3, 1863. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Refused to muster. 
Refused to muster. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant. 
Refused to muster. 
Promoted to First Lieutenan . 
Promoted to First Lieutenan . 
Promoted to First Lieutenan . 
Promoted to First Lieutenan . 
Promoted to First Lieutenan . 
Promoted to First Lieutenan . 


Joseph Miller 


Ephriam B. Stout 


Charles A. Walker 
Benjamin Jelleff, jr 

Edward R. Anthony 
( harles Friedeborn 
James L. Thompson 
Charles S. Jessup 


Hiram H. Trdier 


Stephen Coddington 
Wm. P.Jackson 
Kdward L. Quinton 
Joseph Plaisted 


Jan. 8, 1863 
March 29, " 
29, " 
May 3 " 


April 8, 1 : .3 
8, 
29, 
Aug. 25, 
25, 
1 25, 
25, 
" 25, 
" 25, 
25, 
25, 
25, 
May 25, 1 4 
Sept. 26, 
26, 
26, 




June 11, " 
10, " 

July 3, " 
May 23, ] 

26, " 
March 25, " 
27, " 
2. ., 1861 
Sept. 26, " 
26, 
26, " 


Harvev Woodward 
Wilson B. Gaither 
Henry C. Koogle 
.Jeremiah Robinson 


Martin Bar ringer 
John B. Heal...: 
Charles B. Jacobs 
Herman Behmer 
Jos-pli L. Gaul 
Peter A. Cozine 





42 OHIO IN THE WAR 



FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFAFTKY. 



TH I S was originally one of the three-months organizations, and was made up of young 
men from Cincinnati and the vicinity. It went into Camp Harrison, near Cincinnati, 
April 20, 1861, and was mustered into the United States service May 8th. On the 
23d of May it was sent to Camp Dennison. Before, however, the regiment was completely 
equipped, the call for the three-years troops was issued, and on the 20th of June the Fifth Ohio, 
by unanimous consent of the men, was mustered for three years. On July 10, 1861, the regi 
ment left Camp Dennison and went by rail to Bellair, where it crossed the Ohio Kiver to Ben- 
wood, Virginia, and from thence to Grafton and Clarksburg, Virginia. 

On the afternoon of the 13th of July orders were received to move, but the cars were not 
ready until the night of the 14th, when the regiment was taken to Oakland, Virginia. It 
marched from that place on the same day, under Brigadier-General Charles W. Hill. This was 
the first march of the regiment, and was especially severe, on account of their total inexpe 
rience. Its route lay up and over a spur of the Alleghany Mountains. .After failing in this 
attempt to intercept the flying Eebel forces of General Garnet s defeated army, the regiment 
returned to Oakland. The first death in the regiment occurred at this place, a private being 
accidentally shot by one of his comrades. 

Parkersburg was the next camping place, where the regiment lay until the 5th of August, 
most of the time engaged in guard-duty and drill. 

On August 5th the regiment again took up the line of march for Buckhannon. It lay here 
until the 3d of November. Near this place, at French Creek, companies A, B, and C had an 
engagement with a band of Kebels, killing six or seven of them, and losing one man killed. 
From thence it went to New Creek, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. On the 7th of Novem 
ber it was at Bomney, Virginia. The duties at this place were very arduous, companies being 
Bent out daily on scouts. The picket-force alone amounted to nearly one thousand men, por 
tions of whom were stationed six and seven miles from camp. 

While at Romney General Kelly, then in command of the National forces, was disabled by 
the wound he had received at Philippi, and was superseded by Colonel S. H. Dunning, of the 
Fifth Ohio. Learning that a force of Rebels, fifteen hundred strong, was stationed at Blue s 
Gap, sixteen miles from Romney, Colonel Dunning determined, if possible, to surprise and cap 
ture it. Selecting the night of the 6th of January, 1862, he started at midnight, during a driving 
snow-storm, and, reaching the enemy s outpost picket-line, captured it, and moved on until 
within a mile of the Rebel camp. At this point the expedition was discovered by the Rebel 
pickets, who fled to the main body and gave the alarm. The National troops pushed on and up 
the steep mountain side, the men being compelled to drag themselves up by the aid of the under 
brush and roots. Arriving at the top, the men opened fire and charged the enemy, driving him 
out of his intrenchments, killing twenty, capturing a number of prisoners and two pieces of can 
non. The residence of Colonel Blue, his outhouses, and mill were burned to the ground. This 
was the commencement of the reputation of the Fifth Ohio for bravery and thoroughness in 
dealing with Rebels. The Rebel papers of that day contained notices and anathemas against 
the regiment, headed, as they said, " by a butcher," and advising the Rebel commanders to 
show the members of it no quarter. 

The Fifth returned to its camp at Romney the same day of the fight, having marched thirty- 
*bur miles and dispersed and defeated fifteen hundred Rebels inside of fourteen hours. 



FIFTH OHIO INFANTRY. 43 

On January 10, 1862, the regiment left Romney and fell back to Patterson Creek. General 
Lander was now in command. Thence the Fifth went to New Creek, and remained there up to 
the 3d of February ; then returned to Patterson Creek. From this date until the 13th of Feb 
ruary it was engaged in a series of arduous marches and counter-marches, often camping in the 
snow without tents or blankets, and suffering intensely from the fierce winds of that wild country. 

On the 13th of February the Fifth and Eighth Ohio, with a force of cavalry, made a recon- 
noissance on Bloomery Furnace, the whole under command of General Lander. The cavalry, 
led by General Lander, had a skirmish with a body of Rebels, killing and wounding a number, 
and taking some thirty prisoners, including a Colonel, Major, Adjutant, and twelve officers of 
the line. 

The regiment returned to camp at Pawpaw on the 14th of February. At this place, on the 
2d of March, General Lander died, and was succeeded in the command by Colonel Nathan Kim- 
ball, of the Fourteenth Indiana. 

From this time until the latter part of March nothing of material interest occurred. On 
the 18th of March the command, under General Shields, made a reconnoissance to Strasburg, 
the Fifth Ohio in the advance. Some shots were exchanged with a force of Rebels, but no casual 
ties occurred. The enemy was followed to a point seven miles beyond Mount Jackson, when the 
command returned and marched to Winchester, reaching that place on the evening of the 20th 
of March. 

On Saturday, the 22d of March, the long-roll was sounded and the whole force ordered out. 
The Fifth went through Winchester on the double-quick, cheering, and eager for the fight. 
Some slight cannonading occurred that afternoon, during which General Shields was wounded 
in the arm. The Fifth performed picket-duty on the Romney Road that night, to prevent sur 
prise from that direction. 

On the morning of the 23d of March the Fifth marched out to Kernstown, four miles from 
Winchester, and took position in support of Daum s Indiana battery. At nine o clock A. M. 
the battle of Winchester was opened. The Fifth continued in support of Daum s battery until 
late in the afternoon, when companies A, B, C, D, and E, under command of Colonel Kilpatrick, 
moved up, under orders, and passing through a clump of underbrush emerged into an open field, 
where it received the first fire of the enemy. This little band, although faced by overwhelming 
numbers, returned the Rebel fire with interest. The Eighty-Fourth Pennsylvania, on its right, 
attempted to follow, but quailed and fell back in disorder. Colonel Murray, of that regiment, 
in attempting to rally them, lost his life. The Fifth Ohio poured its volleys into the enemy at 
short range, and stubbornly maintained its position until re-enforcements came up. It then 
advanced and drove the enemy in disorder. In this fierce encounter five of the color-bearers of 
the regiment were shot down in succession. Captain George B. Whitcom, of Cincinnati, was one 
of these, and lost his life while waving the colors over his head. A bullet struck him just above 
the eye, and buried itself in his brain. 

When the Eighty-Fourth Pennsylvania fell back in confusion General Sullivan, commanding 
the brigade, exclaimed that the army was whipped ; but on looking again he observed the Fifth 
Ohio still fighting, and exclaimed: "No, thank God; the brave Fifth Ohio is still standing its 
ground, and holding the Rebels." The Fourteenth Indiana moved forward at this critical 
moment, and the tide was turned. The enemy, beaten at all points, turned and fled. The dark 
ness of the night alone prevented the most vigorous pursuit. The loss of the Fifth Ohio was 
forty-seven killed and wounded. The entire loss of the National force did not exceed five hun 
dred. The Rebel loss was believed to be more than double that number. The regimental colors 
were perforated with forty-eight bullet holes, and the State flag with ten. 

The dead were buried and the wounded properly disposed of, and again, on the 24th of 
March, the regiment resumed the march. The first camping-place was five miles beyond Stras 
burg. On the 1st of April the regiment passed on through Woodstock, again encamped near 
Edinburg, near the bank of the Shenandoah River. The progress of the National force was 
checked at this point by the burning of a bridge which spanned the river, and by Ashby s 



44 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

cavalry, which had taken position on the opposite side. Shots were exchanged, but no damage 
resulted. A few days thereafter a dash was made by the Fifth Ohio and some Vermont cavalry 
into Mount Jackson, but the enemy had flown. After making sundry marches up and down the 
valley the regiment went into camp at New Market, Colonel S. H. Dunning in command of the 
brigade. It remained at New Market two weeks, drilling, reviewing, etc. 

On May 3d marching orders were received, and an advance was made to Harrisonburg. 
General Banks s force was falling back. General Shields s force now also fell back about eight 
miles and took a position in which tlie General declared he could easily whip Jackson, but that 
renowned Rebel kept out of the way. Before leaving Harrisonburg (on the 7th of May) the 
Fifth Ohio was presented with a beautiful stand of colors, sent to them by the City Council of 
Cincinnati, as a token of the appreciation of the people of Cincinnati for its bravery and efficiency 
in the battle of Winchester. 

Marching was resumed on the 12th of May, and continued until Falmouth was reached, a 
distance of one hundred and fifty miles. After lying here until the 25th of May the regiment 
marched to Front Royal, where, halting a few hours, it again pushed on through the driving 
rain and muddy roads. The night of the 3d of June found the regiment on the banks of the 
Shenandoah, having marched two hundred and eighty-five miles to no purpose, and with scarcely 
half-rations. The same history was repeated until, on the 8th of June, the regiment reached 
Port Republic. The next morning the battle was opened. This was a hot and well-contested 
affair, and the regiment conducted itself with its usual bravery and dash. After firing a couple 
of volleys it was ordered to charge on a fence behind which a couple of Rebel regiments were hid. 
The charge was a success, the Rebels fleeing before them into the woods, where they rallied. 
Again the Fifth charged, and captured one piece of artillery. Immediately thereafter it marched 
to the left and repulsed a charge made by the enemy on a battery. The Rebels were too strong 
however, and retreat became necessary. The order was finally given, and the Fifth was desig 
nated to cover the movement, in doing Avhich it lost one hundred and eighty-five men taken 
prisoners. The total loss of the regiment was two hundred and forty-four in killed, wounded, 
and prisoners. 

Many incidents of personal valor and cunning occurred in this affair. Lieutenant Kirkup, 
of Cincinnati, who had been taken prisoner, escaped from his guard, but had not proceeded far 
when he came in contact with two Rebels. He claimed them as prisoners they yielded, and 
conducted him safely out of the mountains. The colors were saved by the Color-Corporals, 
Brinkman and Shaw, by wrapping them around their persons, swimming the Shenandoah, and 
joining General Fremont s command four days thereafter. 

The retreat was continued until the evening of the 10th, when a halt was made near Luray, 
where it was allowed to rest until the 21st of June. It then marched through Thoroughfare 
Gap to Bristow Station, reaching that point about five P. M. of the 24th. 

From the 24th of June the regiment was on the march every day for five successive weeks ; 
those days of sullen gloom and confusion, when the enemy, under Jackson, was worrying them 
with his swift and uncertain movements. In these marches they traversed a distance of more 
than five hundred miles, and when at last they were halted at Alexandria, the men were nearly 
naked, without shelter, and completely worn out. After being recruited in health, on the 25th of 
July they went by rail to Warrenton, Virginia, where they remained until the 31st; thence 
marched to Little Washington, arriving on the 1st of August. While at this place General 
Tyler took leave of the brigade, and of the Fifth in particular, as they were mutually endeared 
to each other by reason of "floods and perils" together. The successor of General Tyler took 
command in the person of General Geary, of Mexican fame. 

On the 9th of August, 1862, then lying at Culpepper C. H., the Fifth made a forced march 
of eight miles, to reach the battle-field of Cedar Mountain, in which engagement they partici 
pated under command of Colonel J. H. Patrick. Re- enforcements failing to arrive in season, 
overwhelming numbers forced the troops to fall back. The loss of the Fifth in this battle was 
eighteen killed, thirteen commissioned officers and eighty-nine men wounded, and two missing, 



FIFTH OHIO INFANTEY. 45 

out of two hundred and seventy-five with which they entered the battle. In this engagement 
Lieutenant-Colonel H. G. Armstrong was so badly wounded as to disable him from further field- 
service. Then came the retrogade movements of Pope s army; those fierce, sanguinary battles, 
fighting over almost the whole territory from Cedar Mountain to the intrenchments around 
Washington City. In all this the Fifth bore a brave and bloody part. After a brief respite it 
joined the forces in pursuit of the llebel army. 

Passing through Frederick City, Middletown, and Boonsboro , the field of Antietam was 
reached on the night of the 16th of September. At daylight the regiment marched on the bat 
tle-field. The Twenty-Eighth Pennsylvania had the right, followed by the Fifth Ohio, in com 
mand of Major John Collins, Colonel Patrick being sick. The Fifth Ohio proceeded in column, 
by company, until within the range of the enemy s fire. About fifty yards in front was a belt of 
woods, occupied by the Rebels. The regiment advanced to the edge and opened fire, and in a short 
time drove the Rebels into a cornfield, where it followed and engaged them in a fierce hand-to- 
hand conflict, many of the men using the butts of their guns. The conflict here was terrible, 
but the enemy was at last compelled to give way, contesting every foot of the ground as they did 
so. They were driven from the field into an open plain, and from thence into and through a 
woods about a quarter of a mile distant. The pursuit was stopped, and the position held. 

Fresh bodies of Rebels were continually coming up, and it became apparent that without 
re-enforcements the Fifth Ohio and its brigade could not hold out much longer, for its whole 
strength did not exceed five hundred men. Two regiments were sent to its assistance; but, after 
firing a few volleys, they broke and ran in great confusion. These flying regiments were posted 
on the left, and their retreat made it necessary for the brigade to fall back to prevent its being 
outflanked. The advancing Rebels were soon met by a portion of Franklin s command, who 
again drove them beyond the woods. Night coming on closed the battle, the National forces 
occupying the whole battle-field, having driven the Rebels, with great loss, half a mile beyond 
their original lines. 

During the time the Fifth Ohio was engaged in the battle its cartridge-boxes were emptied 
three times, making about one hundred shots per man. On the outer edge of the cornfield men 
tioned above lay a row of dead Rebels on their faces, as though they had been dragged there 
and laid in order. In the open field near no less than three hundred dead and Avounded Rebels 
were lying. 

In this battle the Fifth Ohio lost fifty-four men killed and wounded out of one hundred and 
eighty, the number with which it entered the conflict. 

After various marches and counter-marches the Fifth went into camp at Dumfries, Virginia, 
on the 16th of December, 1862. On the 27th the garrison was attacked by General Stuart s 
Rebel cavalry. The engagement lasted from one P. M. until after dark, when the Rebels 
retreated, leaving many dead on the field. Colonel Patrick led the Fifth in this affair. Lieu 
tenants Walker and Leforce, of company G, were killed, three wounded, and five made prisoners. 

The regiment lay at Dumfries through the months of January, February, March, and part 
of April. On the 20th of April, 1863, it joined the general advance of Major-General Hooker s 
army, skirmishing as it marched, and crossed the Rapidan on the 29th. On the 1st of May the 
regiment entered the battle of Chancellorsville, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Kilpat- 
rick. In this bloody battle the Fifth performed a distinguished part now fighting behind 
intrenchments thrown up at night in the face of the enemy ; again, making fruitless efforts to 
arrest the retreating tide of the Eleventh Corps, which had given way on the second day ; at 
another time retiring to the trenches for rest, to be aroused at midnight by the artillery, which 
(by reason of the bright moonlight) could be rendered as effective by night as by day ; buffeting 
the pitiless rain and northern blasts of the fourth day; now breasting the iron hail, and, finally, 
abandoning their position near Chancellor House only when all our forces to the right, left, and 
rear, except one regiment, had retired. 

Their next great battle was that of Gettysburg. The cannonading commenced early in the 
morning of the 2d of July. The Fifth lay in the woods in front of the town nearly all of that 



46 Oino IN THE WAR 

day, and did not suffer much until about four P. M., when the shells began to fall thickly around, 
several of the men being Avoimded while lying on the ground. At sundown they moved to the 
extreme right, and acted as pickets till midnight, when they returned to their old position in the 
woods; on the 3d they were engaged from daylight until eleven A. M. About four P. M. the 
enemy, with parked artillery, began a terrific cannonade. The Fifth being in direct range of 
this fire, the shot and shell crashed terribly among the trees of the orchard in which they were 
lying. The men lay on their arms that night. On the morning of the 4th of July it was 
definitely ascertained that victory had crowned our arms, and that the Rebels were in full retreat 
for Richmond, leaving thousands of their dead and wounded in our hands. Lieutenant Brink- 
man, one of the heroes of Port Republic, was killed in this engagement. The Fifth participated 
in the fruitless pursuit that followed. 

In August, 1883, the regiment was sent from Alexandria, Virginia, to New York City, just 
after the great mob there. It remained in New York until September 8th; then returned to 
Alexandria, and after a series of marches around Washington, Manassas Junction, etc., embarked 
on the 28th of September via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for Benwood, Virginia, where it 
arrived on the 30th. Thence it went by rail through Ohio to Indianapolis, Indiana, avoiding 
Cincinnati, the home of nearly all the men, where they had not been for two and a half years. 
A perfect ovation accompanied them through Ohio and Indiana "their deeds had gone before 
them." At Louisville they took the cars for Nashville; from thence they were rushed down to 
Murfreesboro (which place was menaced by the enemy), arriving there on the 6th of October. 
They found the trenches filled with the people, and the enemy in the town. The Fifth, with 
others, drove the enemy out and re-instated the citizens. 

In the grand advance of Rosecrans s army toward Chattanooga the Fifth formed a part, and 
and on the 14th of November, 1SG3, had the honor of opening the battle above the clouds, on 
Lookout Mountain, under the lead of General Hooker. 

On the 14th of January, 1864, the Fifth was at Bridgeport, Alabama, doing post-duty in 
connection with the Seventh. It was with Sherman in his grand march toward Atlanta, and 
participated in the conflicts which marked his progress. At or near Dalton, Georgia, they lost 
their brave Colonel, J. II. Patrick, who fell while leading the Fifth in a charge against the 
enemy, and died amid the shouts of victory. A few days thereafter, the time of the regiment 
(three years) having expired, they were ordered to the rear, in charge of prisoners. Notwith 
standing their hard and almost continual service; notwithstanding they were literally shattered 
to pieces, this brave band of heroes resolved to "go in for the war." This gave them the privi 
lege of a short furlough home. Before the term expired most, if not all, "the boys" were back 
"to the front," bravely and zealously following the lead of General Sherman in his "march to 
the sea," participating in all the hardships of the campaign, and always on hand when fighting 
was to be done. From Savannah to Goldsboro they waded through the swamps, driving the 
enemy; then came that great flood of sunlight, Lee s surrender; the triumphant march up 
through the Rebel States and Richmond; thence to Washington, joining in the grand review; 
thence to the Queen City of the West, their home; and at last the muster-out at Louisville, 26th 
July, 1S65, and the final payment and discharge at Camp Dennison. 

This gallant regiment, during its term of service, took part in twenty-eight different 
engagements, the principal of which were : Winchester, Port Republic, McDowell, Cedar 
Mountain, Dumfries, South Mountain, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Lookout Moun 
tain, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, and Savannah. 

During its term of service the regiment traveled one thousand three hundred and seventy- 
five miles on foot and nine hundred and ninety-three on cars, and was engaged in six pitched 
battles, besides a great number of reconnoissances and skirmishes, and sustained a loss in the 
aggregate of five hundred men, killed, wounded, and taken prisoners. 



FIFTH OHIO INFANTRY. 47 

To show the fierceness of the contest around and in the vicinity of Washington at the com 
mencement of Pope s campaign, we give the following passages, copied from a diary kept by an 
officer of the Fifth Ohio : 

" On the afternoon of tho 25th of July, having first loaded the camp equipage, we were once 
more on the move. We arrived at Warrenton late at night. General Pope, who was now in 
command of the Army of Virginia, had his head-quarters here, and was concentrating his forces. 
We left Warrenton on the 31st of July, arriving near Little Washington the next day. The 
Twenty-Eighth Pennsylvania, consisting of fifteen companies and Knapp s Battery, were now 
added to our brigade, and Brigadier-General Geary placed in command. We were now assigned 
to, and formed part of, Major-General Banks s corps. We again pulled up stakes on the 5th 
of August, passing through Sperryville the same day, arriving at Culpepper C. II. on the night 
of the 7th. We remained in camp on the 8th under orders to turn out at a moment s notice. 
During the day, reports came into camp that our troops, in considerable numbers, were drawn up 
in order of battle, and that Banks s corps was intended for the reserve. 

"The next morning about eight o clock, we passed through Culpepper, all in fine spirits at 
the prospect of a fight. . . . We kept on, and it now became apparent that instead of the 
reserve, we had become the advance, and if any fighting was to be done we would have a 
hand in it. Three miles further, and within five miles of the Rapidan, we turned into a field 
under cover of a hill. Our cavalry made a reconnoissance, and were fired upon by the enemy. 
A sharp fire was kept up for some time, and our cavalry withdrew. 

"The Rebels could now be seen maneuvering in our front, and shortly after opened fire with 
a piece of artillery. Their fire remained unanswered for some time. Finally, a battery was put 
in position near the brow of the hill, and opened fire upon them. The shot from this battery all 
fell short, while those of the rebels all overreached. Knapp s Battery of Parrott guns was after 
ward put in position and opened fire with better success, forcing the Rebel battery to change its 
position. . . . The infantry was assigned its position. The Second Division, General 
Augur, occupied the left of the road leading to the Rapidan; the First Division the right of the 
road. The whole line, with the exception of the left-center, was heavily timbered. This posi 
tion was assigned our brigade composed of the Fifth, Seventh, Twenty-Ninth, and Sixty- 
Sixth Ohio. 

" The brigade was formed in two lines Seventh and Sixty-Sixth, and Fifth and Twenty- 
Ninth and was stationed to the right and in rear of Knapp s Battery. The Rebel infantry hav 
ing made their appearance in our front, the^first line the Seventh and Sixty-Sixth was ordered 
forward. The infantry fire now opened, and soon after the Fifth and Twenty-Ninth were ordered 
up. The ground in front of us was rolling, and, advancing about one hundred yards, we ascended 
the brow of a hill, when the enemy opened upon us with canister and grape. We moved on, 
reserving our fire for closer range, and then opened upon them, advancing as we did so. As we 
advanced, we observed a large body of Rebels on our left flank, and the regiment changed front 
to attack them, thus leaving those who were before in front, on our right flank. 

" Simultaneous with our change of front a fire was opened upon us from the rear of our 
right flank, our forces on the right having fallen back, and we were thus subject to three fires. 
The General had ordered a retreat, but it never reached the men, or was not heard by them. 
We maintained our position, subject to this cross-fire, until driven from it, which was not until 
one-half of the brigade had fallen killed or woundc-d. 

Our regiment went into the fight with two hundred and seventy-five men, and lost one 
hundred and twenty-five killed and wounded. Among the number wounded were eleven line 
officers, the Major and Adjutant. We fell back about two miles in confusion, there not being 
sufficient officers left to re-form the men The Rebels did not follow, but remained in possession 
of the field." 



48 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



6th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 


W. K. BOSLEY 


April 

May 
April 


20, 1861 
20, " 
20, || 

2\ " 
20, " 
20, " 
20. " 
20, " 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 

20, ; 

20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 
20, 


April 

May 
April 


20, 1861 
20 " 
20, " 
2, " 
2, M 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 




ALEX. C. CHRISTOPHKR 


Ass t Surgeon 


F W AMFS 


Marcus Aurelius Westcutt. 

.Till in n VV)iif,j 


Do 




Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Frank 11. Klimian 
Samuel Carrick Er\\ r in 
George S. Smith 
Anthonv 0. Russell 
Henry 11 Tinker 


James Bense 
Julius C. Guthrie 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Jolm Wilber Wilson 


James Willis Wilmington. 


John C. Parker 
John F Hoy 


Charles Il.Brutton 
Wm S G"ttv 


John W. Morgan 
Richard Southgate 
Frank M. llulburd 
Nicholas L. Anderson 
Edward 31. Shoemaker 
Henry McAlpin 


Thomas S. Hoyse 
Charles H Titus 


Ezekiel H. Tntem 
Louis S. Worthington 


J\iles J. Montagnier 


20, " 

20. " 
20, " 
20, " 


20* " 
30, " 
" 20, " 

" 20, " 


Charles F Porter.. . 


Augustus B. Billerbeck 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel ... . W. K BOSLEY 


June 
Aug. 


i 2, 
19, 


1861 
1862 


Juno 
Oct. 


12, 1861 
8, 1862 


Honorably discharged August 19, 1862. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 


NICHOL S L.ANDERSON 


Lt. Colonel.... 


NICHOLAS L. ANDERSON 


June 


12, 


IS61 


June 


12, 1861 


Promoted to Colonel. 


Do 


ALEX IIC. CHRISTOPHER 


Aug. 


19, 


is.-,j 


Oct. 


8, 1862 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Major .... 


ALEX R C. CHRISTOPHER.... 


June 


12, 


!- :] 


June 


12, 1861 


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 


Do. . 


ANTHONY 0. RUSSELL 
SAMUEL C. ERWIN 


Aug. 
Fell. 


19, 
20, 


1862 
1863 


Nov. 
April 


18, 1861 
19, 1863 


Resigned February 20, 1862. 
Killed in action November 25, 1862. 


Do. .. 


Do 


J \MES BENSE 


Nov. 


25, 


44 


Jan. 


20, 1864 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Surgeon 


STARLING LOVING 


June 


18, 


1861 


June 


IS, 1862 


Resigned October 20, 1861. 


Do 


A. H. STEPHENS 


Oct. 


20 




Julv 


7, 1862 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Ass t Surgeon 


F. W. AMKS 


June 


18, 


1861 


LMJ 

June 


18, 1861 


Resigned June 12, 1863. 


Do. 


WM. W. FOUNTAIN 


May 


6, 


1863 


May 


6, 1863 


Resigned August 8, 1863. 


Do. 


ISRAEL BIDKLT 


Aug. 


11. 


" 




11, 1863 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Captain 


Marcus A. Westc-.tt 


June 


12. 


1861 


June 


12, 1861 


Resigned March 9, 1863. 


Do 


Joseph A. Andrews 


14 


12, 


** 




12, " 


Resigned April 22, 1862. 


Do 


James Willis Wilmington. 


44 


1 2 


41 


tfc 


12, " 


Resigned July 6, 1862. 


Do 


Ezekiel H. Tateni 


14 


i * 


*"* 


41 


12, " 


Killed by railroad July 19, 1862. 


Do 


Samuel C. Erwin " 


12! 


* 


ti 


12, || 


Promoted to Major. 


Do 


Charles II. Brutton | " 


12, 


4 


< 




Resigned January 14, 1862. 


Do 


Anthonv O. Russell 


4 


12, 





1 


12 ** 


Promoted to Major. [with regiment. 


Do 


Henrv H. Tinker 


t4 


12, 


* 


( 


12, || 


Wounded at Chickamauga ; mustered out 


Do 


James Bense 


* 


12, 


* 


( 




Promoted to Major. 


Do 


Charles M. Clark 


" 


1 _! 




* 


12! 


Resigned September 8, 1862. 


Do 


Henry McAlpin 


April 


L L ] 


1862 


May 


9, L-62 


Diedofwouiidd rec dat Stone River Jan. 10, 63. 




Win S Gettv 


Julv 


6, 




Nov. 


8 


Resigned February 24 1863. 


Do 


Richard Southgate 


Sept. 




i 




18* 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Do! . . . . . . 


Charles B. Russell 


Aug. 


I 1 ! 


" 


" 


18, 


Clustered out -with regiment. 


Do 


James M. Donovan July 


19, 


6 


Dec. 


16, 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 
Do 


Jules J. Montagnier Jan. 
Justin M. Thatch-r " 


10, 

! !, 


1863 


Jan. 

Feb. 


19, 1863 VV nded and disch d Feb. 19, 64. [with reg. 
13, " Wounded at Mission Ridsre : mustered out 


Do 


Wm. S. (Jetty , March 


1, 


* 


April 




Mustered out with reg t; wounded at Resaca. 


Do 


Wm. E. Sl .eri.hin 




9, 


** 


it 


10* " Served in S. C. since Jan. 26, 62; m. o. with r. 


Do. 


Charles Gil man : Feb 


20, 


it 


(4 


7, " Honorably discharged December 21, 1863. 


Do 


B-niniiii-i F. W.-st April 


1, 


1864 


" 


l| 1864! MiiHtered "out withl-esriment. Iresr t. 


Do ] Frank S. Scheitt er i " 


1, 




" 


1, " | Wounded at Stone River ; mustered out witl. 



SIXTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



49 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF KANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

te 
fe 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Henry C. Choate . 


May 

July 


9, 1864 
12, 1861 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, || 


May 
July 


9, 1864 

12, 1M)1 

12, " 

12, " 
12, " 
12, " 

12| " 

12| " 

7, " 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. TOct. 12, 1862. 
Promoted by President Sept. 25, 62; hon. dis. 
Resigned February 14, 1862. 
Resigned February 11, 1862. 
Resigned August 1, 1862. 
Resigned October 22, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned September 11, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned October 26, 1861. 
Promoted July 19, 1862. [regiment. 
Detached at own request; mustered out with 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. [regiment. 
Detached at own request; mustered out with 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed December 31, 1862. 
Detached at own request. 
Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Honorably discharged January 29, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned October 29, 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned April 14, 1864. 
Promoted April 22, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned February 15, 1862. 
Promoted February 11,1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted July 19, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted Julv 6, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Accidentally killed at Klkwater, Va. 
Promoted February 28, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 


Charles B. Russell 
Frank II.Khrman 
John C. Parker 


John F. Hoy 


Edward M. Shoemaker 
Wm S Gfttv 


Aug. 


12J " 
12, " 
12, | 


Sept. 


John W. Morgan 


Richard Southtrato 
\ugustus B. Billerbock 
James M. Donovan 


Justin M. Thatcher 
Benjamin J. West 
Jeoi-ge W. Morris 
!harlef) Oilman 
Jules J. Montagnier 
Benjamin F. West 
Wm E Sheridan 


Feb. 

April 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 


20, " 
28, 1862 

22! " 

i5; 

8, " 
1, " 
20, " 
119, || 


Dec. 

Feb. 
March 
Mav 
Nov. 

Dec. 
Jan. 


2(51 " 

28, 1862 
20, " 
9, || 

isl " 

18, " 
18, " 
20, " 
16, " 
19, 1863 


\lbert G Williams 


James K. Reynolds 
Frank S SchoinVr 


Nov. 
July 
Dec. 


Everett S. Throop 


John 11 Kestner.. 


Jan. 

Feb. 
March 
Oct. 


10, 1863 
28, " 
14, " 
20, " 
9, " 
22, " 
29, " 
1, 1861 
1, " 
1, " 
9, " 
12, 1861 


Feb. 
April 
Jan. 
April 

May 

June 


19, " 
3, " 
3, " 

1(1, 1864 
10, || 

li " 

9, " 
12, 1861 

12* " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, || 


James F. Irwin 
J. Biirt Holmes 
Joseph L. Antram 
Jesse C. La Bille 


John F. MHine 
George F. Lewis 
J. F. Graham 
George W. Cormany 
Leonard Boyce 
lames M. Donovan 


April 

May 
June 


harles Oilman 


Aug. 
Dec. 

Feb. 
April 
July 

Sept. 

July 
Dec. 
Jan. 


12! " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 


ioorge W. Morris 
Frank S Scheitt c-r 


Jules J. Montagnier 


Benjamin F. West 
Justin M. Thatcher 
Wm. P. Anderson 


11\ 1862 
20, " 

22l " 

11, " 
6, " 
11. " 
19, " 
1, " 
S, " 
19, " 
19, " 

i o 1863 
14, " 


Aug. 
Dec. 

Feb. 
March 
May 
June 
Oct. 
Nov. 

Dec. 
Jan. 

Feb. 


3, " 
12, 1862 
20, " 
28, " 
20, " 
1, 
3, " 
25, " 
8, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
16, " 
19, 1863 
19, " 

I 
1 

25, 
4, 

10, 1864 


Appointed by President September 19, 1862. 
Promoted September 8, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Dismissed March 1, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned September 11, 1862. 
Resigned July 11, 1862. 
Promoted August 1, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned January 22, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed December 31, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned 25, 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 


Wm. E. Sheridan 
Edward M. Gettier 
Uenrv C. Choate 
Henry Gee 
Edmund B Warren 


Albert G. Williams 


James F. Irwin 


J. Buvt Holmes 


J. L. Antram 
C. II. Foster 


John It. Kestner 
John F. Meline 
Jesse La Bille . 




J. F Graham 


G. W. Cormany 


Josiah W. Slanker 
Wesley B. Me Lane 
Wm. K. Glenn . 


Fob. 
March 

June 
Oct. 


2< l || 

1* " 

?, - " 


Jan. 
April 

July 
Dec. 
Jan. 


W. R. Goodnou"h 


Wm. C. Perkins 
F. Mellon 


Wm. R. Gleeson.. 





VOL. II. 4. 



OHIO IN THE WAK, 



SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE nucleus of this regiment was an independent military organization of the city 
of Cincinnati, known as the Guthrie Gray Battalion, from which the regiment was 
first organized in April, 1861, and mustered into the three months service, about eight 
hundred strong, upon the 18th of the same month, at Camp Harrison, Ohio, by Captain Gordon 
Granger, United States Army, afterward Major-General Volunteers. Shortly after muster-in it 
was transferred to Camp Dennison. 

Under the call for three hundred thousand men, the regiment was reorganized for the three 
years service, recruited to the maximum, and mustered in June 18, 1861, by Captain Walker, 
United States Army, with an aggregate of one thousand and sixteen. 

Immediately after the muster-in and equipment, the regiment was ordered to Western Vir 
ginia. Leaving Camp Dennison on the 30th of June, 1861, it traveled by rail to Grafton, West 
Virginia, where it arrived on the 2d of July, and reported for duty to Brigadier-General Mor 
ris, then in command of that district. On July 4th it marched to Philippi, and thence, on July 
(Uh, to Laurel Hill, then fortified and held by the Rebels under General Garnet. 

The regiment took part in the operations before that place, and in the subsequent pursuit 
of the Rebels, ending in the affair of Carrick s Ford, July 10th. 

On the 20th of July it marched to Beverly, went into camp there, and remained till August, 
when it was ordered to Elkwater, and went into camp at the foot of Cheat Mountain. Colonel 
Bosley was left in command of the post at Beverly, and Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson took 
command of the regiment. 

Here it remained, making several reconnoissances to the front, among the defiles of the 
mountains, holding the fortifications with the rest of the division then under the command of 
Brigadier-General J. J. Reynolds, against the advance of General Lee, with some skirmishing, 
but no serious fighting. During the advance of General Lee, an advance picket post from the 
Sixth, consisting of Captain Bense, Lieutenants ScheiflTer and Oilman, with forty men from com 
pany I, were cut off from the main army and taken prisoners. They were exchanged in the fall 
of 1862, and joined the regiment near Nashville, Tennessee. 

TTpon the 19th of November, 1861, the camp at Elkwater was broken up ; and leaving the 
Second Virginia Infantry in the works, the regiment marched through Beverly, Buckhannon, 
and Clarksburg, to Parkersburg, and thence moved by steamer to Louisville, where it joined 
the Army of the Ohio, then concentrating at that point under General Buell. 

In the organization of the Army of the Ohio, the Sixth was placed in the Fifteenth Brigade, 
Colonel M. S. Hascall, Seventeenth Indiana Volunteers, commanding, and in the Fourth Divis 
ion, Brigadier-General William Nelson commanding. 

The division marched to Camp Wickliffe, some sixty miles south of Louisville, and went 
into a camp of instruction for the winter, Avhere it remained, drilling daily, until February 14, 
1862, when the camp was broken up, and the division marched to West Point and there embarked 
on steamers, and sailed down the Ohio River, with the intention of re-enforcing General Grant, 
who was at that time besieging Fort Donelson. When the fleet reached Evansville the news of 



SIXTH OHIO INFANTKY. 51 

the surrender of Fort Donelson was received ; and, after cruising up and down the Ohio for sev 
eral days, the fleet proceeded to Smithland, and then up the Cumberland River to Nashville. 

On the 25th of February, 1862, first of all the Army of the Ohio, the Fourth Division 
reached Nashville; the remainder of the army, marching across the country from Louisville, 
arrived later. The Sixth Ohio was the first of the division to march through the town and 
their regimental flag was the first National flag hoisted over the State house in that city. The 
Fourth Division went into camp on the Murfreesboro pike ; and while here, the Sixth was 
assigned to the Tenth Brigade, Colonel Ammen, Twenty-Fourth Ohio Volunteers, commanding. 
On the 17th of March the Army of the Ohio moved southward from Nashville, the Fourth 
Division taking the advance. Crossing Duck River at Columbia, Tennessee, and going into 
camp at Savannah, Tennessee, April 6, 1862. The next morning the battle of Pittsburg Land 
ing opened, and the division marched across the country Sunday afternoon to the field. The 
Tenth Brigade, composed of the Ninety-Fourth Ohio, Thirty-Sixth Indiana, and Sixth Ohio, 
was the advance; and these were the first troops of Buell s army that crossed the river at Pitts- 
burg Landing. The crossing was effected under fire, and the two regiments first mentioned, 
with the right wing of the Sixth, were thrown into line just in time to repel the last charge the 
Rebels made upon the National left that day. The next morning the division advanced at day 
light, and was soon actively engaged with the enemy. The Sixth was held in reserve, support 
ing Captain Terrill s Battery of the Fifth United States Artillery, and, except the companies on 
the skirmish line, was not actively engaged with the enemy, although under a heavy artillery 
fire during the entire engagement. The army camped upon the field of battle till May 24th, 
when the advance against Corinth commenced. Colonel Bosley joined the regiment from sick- 
leave while in camp on the battle-ground, but shortly returned to Cincinnati on renewed 
sick-leave. 

The Sixth bore its part in all the operations before Corinth, and in the subsequent pursuit 
of the Rebels for sixty miles south of that place, when the Fourth Division returned, marching 
through luka, Mississippi; Tuscumbia, and Florence, Alabama, to Athens, Alabama, where they 
went into camp till July 17, 1862, when the entire division was ordered to Murfreesboro , Ten 
nessee. Remaining at this point but a week, they were ordered to McMinnville, Tennessee, 
where they went into camp. While at McMinnville the Sixth was detailed as provost guards, 
and was quartered in the town. General Nelson being relieved from the command of the 
division, General Ammen succeeded him, and Colonel Grose, of the Thirty-Sixth Indiana, took 
command of the brigade. 

Upon the 17th of August the movement of the Army of the Ohio, from its advanced posi 
tion in Tennessee to Louisville commenced, and the Sixth marched with its division, via Nash 
ville, Gallatin, Bowling Green, and West Point, to Louisville. The army reached the latter 
place on the 26th of September, 1862 ; and in the reorganization of the Army of the Ohio the 
Sixth was placed in the Third Brigade, Colonel Grose commanding ; Second Division, Briga 
dier-General W. S. Smith commanding ; of the Fourteenth Army Corps, Major-General T. S. 
Crittenden commanding. The Sixth, in its place in the brigade and division, marched across 
the State of Kentucky, in pursuit of Bragg, to within thirty-five miles of Cumberland Gap. It 
went into camp near Nashville, November 23d, and while here, General Smith was relieved 
from command, and Brigadier-General J. W. Palmer succeeded him. 

The regiment marched with its brigade in the advance upon Murfreesboro , which com 
menced December 26, 1862, taking its share of all skirmish and picket duty. On Wednesday, 
December 31st the division was heavily engaged ; the regiment losing, out of three hundred and 
eighty-three officers and men, one hundred and fifty-two killed, wounded, and prisoners. Only 
six of these were prisoners, taken when the brigade was driven back from its first line. On 
Friday the regiment was again actively engaged, losing, however but seven killed and wounded. 
The regiment went into camp in front of Murfreesboro , and afterward moved out on the McMinn 
ville road to Cripple Creek, eight miles from town. While in camp at these places, several 
reconnoissances were made to the front, as far as to Woodbury and Shelbyville. In the move- 



52 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

raent against Tullahoma, which commenced June 24, 1863, the regiment had hard marching, 
hut no fighting ; and after the evacuation of that point and the retreat of the Kebels to Chatta 
nooga, it went into camp at Manchester on July 7th, and remained till August 16th, when the 
campaign against Chattanooga commenced. 

The Sixth was assigned, temporarily, during this advance, to the Second Brigade, under Brig 
adier-General Hazeu, and with this brigade crossed the two ranges of the Cumberland Mount 
ains into East Tennessee ; then was ordered back, and joined the Third Brigade again at the 
crossing of the Tennessee, below Chattanooga. The brigade marched up the south bank of the 
river, over Lookout Mountains, past the town of Chattanooga, and out to Eossville and Gor 
don s Mills. In the battle of Chickamauga, on the 19th and 20th of September, the regiment 
was actively engaged, losing, out of three hundred and eighty-four officers and men, one hun 
dred and twenty-five killed, wounded, and missing. Colonel Anderson was wounded on the 
19th, and the regiment was under the command of Major Erwin until October, when Lieuten 
ant-Colonel Christopher joined the regiment from recruiting service, and remained in command 
till January 18, 1864. 

After the army fell back to Chattanooga, the Twentieth and Twenty -First Corps were consoli 
dated as the Fourth Corps, under Major-Gcneral Gordon Granger, and the regiment became a 
part of the Second Brigade, Brigadier-General Hazen s ; Third Division, Brigadier-General T. 
J. Wood s, of that Corps. The shutting up of the army in Chattanooga, after the battle of 
Chickamauga, and the scarcity of rations, consequent upon the partial severance of the lines 
of communication, was a severe test of the endurance of both officers and men. The affair 
of October 25th, known as the battle of Brown s Ferry, was fought by picked men from the 
brigades of Generals Hazen and Turchin, of whom the Sixth furnished its due proportion. 
This battle relieved the pressure as to supplies, and enabled the army to hold Chattanooga. 
When active operations commenced in front of Chattanooga, the Fourth Army Corps occupied 
the center, and this regiment was in the advance on Orchard s Knob, November 23d, and in the 
charge up Mission Eidge, on November 25th. Although actively engaged in skirmishing on 
the morning of the 25th, when Major Erwin was killed, and in the first line of battle in the 
charge on the afternoon of the same day, the regiment lost, out of two hundred and sixty-five 
oificers and men, only thirty-three killed, wounded, and missing. 

On the 28th the regiment, with its division, marched to the relief of Knoxville, Tennessee, 
then threatened by Longstreet, and reached that town and went into camp near it on the 7th of 
December. On the 16th of December the regiment marched north to Blair s Cross Koads, and 
then to Morristown, Dandridge, Kutledge, and other points, seldom camping more than one week 
in a place the entire winter, till February 14th, when the division marched south of Knoxville and 
went into camp at Lenoir ; afterward, northward to Morristown, Eutledge, and New Market 
again, until April 6th, when the division was ordered to Cleveland to join the main army. The 
campaign of East Tennessee was the most severe service the regiment ever saw. From Novem 
ber 28th till February 14th the troops were without their baggage, both officers and men living 
in shelter tents, and subsisting, for the most part, off the country already twice passed over. 

The regiment went into camp near Cleveland on the 12th of April, and when the campaign 
against Atlanta opened it was left, with another regiment, to do garrison duty in the town, they 
having the shortest time to serve of any regiments in the division. Upon the 17th of May it was 
ordered to join the main army, and accordingly marched to Kingston, Georgia, and reported to- 
General Thomas, who ordered it back to Eesaca, to guard the railroad bridge over the Ooste- 
naula at that point, where it remained till June 6th, when it was released from duty and ordered 
home to be mustered out of the service. 

The regiment arrived at Cincinnati on June 15th, and after the public reception given by the 
citizens, went into quarters at Camp Dennison, where it Avas mustered out of the service June 
23, 1864, with an aggregate of thirty officers and four hundred and mpety-five enlisted men. 
Several of the non-commissioned officers held commissions* but could not be mustered in, as 
the companies in which the vacancies occurred were below the minimum. 




A SCKNE ON LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN. 



SIXTH OHIO INFANTRY. 53 

The Sixth carried to the close of its service a beautiful stand of colors, which had been pre 
sented by the ladies of Cincinnati in December, 18G2, and a regimental banner received at the 
same time from the City Council. The pledges which Colonel Anderson made for the regiment 
on the occasion of these presentations were, within three weeks, fully redeemed by the part borne 
by the Sixth in that deadly conflict in the cedars of Stone Elver, where its percentage of killed 
and wounded is claimed to have been heavier than that of any other regiment engaged, with the 
exception of the 21st Illinois. 

Colonel Anderson was three times wounded slightly, by a spent ball at Pittsburg Landing; 
painfully, by a flesh wound through the thigh on the first day of Stone River, which, without 
leaving the field, he had bound up, remaining on active duty till the battle was over ; and severely, 
in the left arm, at Chickamauga. Many of the Sixth, after their muster-out, re-enlisted in Han 
cock s Corps. 

During the term of service the regiment marched, in round numbers, three thousand two 
hundred and fifty miles; traveled by steamboat and railroad, two thousand six hundred and 
fifty miles, making a total of five thousand nine hundred miles. The regiment was in four 
pitched battles, losing a total of three hundred and twenty five killed, wounded, and missing. 
And in addition it shared in some half dozen skirmishes and lesser engagements. A large num 
ber of enlisted men, at least seventy-five, received commissions in other regiments, and eleven of 
these were in the regular army. It was in the front from the time it was first ordered to the 
field till May 2, 18G4; and a remarkable feature of the regiment was its uniformly healthy 
condition, the reports showing but sixteen deaths by disease during the entire three years ; and, 
including officers and enlisted men, there were at least two hundred who never lost a day s duty. 
As there were a large number of men possessing a business education in the ranks, the details for 
duty in the Quartermaster s and Adjutant-General s departments of the army were unusually 
large; at one time over two hundred men being OH duty in these departments; so that, notwith 
standing the excellent health, there were never, after the first year s service, more than five 
hundred officers and enlisted men present for duty at any one time; and the regiment went into 
action, usually, with from three hundred and fifty to four hundred men. It was in a good 
state of discipline from first to last; and in the personal neatness of the men, cleanliness of itR 
camp, and condition of arms and accouterments, it was fully equal to the majority of volunteer 
regiments. The men were always cheerful, willing, and obedient, and were at all times ready 
for duty. 

The record does not show much hard fighting, but it does show that which, in the judgment of 
experienced minds, tests the true qualities of a soldier marching and duty of the most severe 
kind. Deeds of heroism and endurance belong to all the regiments of the Army of the Repub 
lic; and comparisons are, generally, as unjust as they are unnecessary. It is sufficient to say, 
that both officers and men enjoyed the fullest confidence of their brigade, division, and corps 
commanders, and earned a reputation in the Army of the Ohio, and in the Army of the Cum 
berland, with which their native city may be well satisfied. 



OHIO IN THE WAR 



7th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



EOSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



HANK. 


NAME. 


PATE OF 


RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 


KBASTUS B. TYLER 
WM. R. CREIGHTON 
JOHN S. CASEMENT 


May 


7, 1861 


May 


7, 1861 






HENRY K. GUSHING 




2 " 


** 


2 4t 






F SUITER 






** 


9 4i 




Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Wm. R. Creighton 
Charles A. DeVilliers 
Giles W. Shurtliff. 
John N. Dever 
John W. Hpragut! 


April 


I 9 I! 
22! " 

23, " 


April 


!% " 

22, " 
22, | 

23*, " 
23, " 


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Resigned. 


Do 




b( 


23, 


IS, 


23, " 




Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 


Joel F. As per 
W. R. Sterling 
John J. Wiseman. 
Wm. Stedman 
Orrin J. Crane 
James T. Sterling 
Orrin J. Crane 
James T. Sterling 
H. Kinaston 


Mijr 

April 


24, 
24, 
211, 
14, 
14, 
15, 
19, 
22, 
22, 


May 
April 


24 , 
20, " 
14, 
11, | 

19 , 
22, 
22, 


Promoted to Captain 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Ralph Lockwood 
John B. Rouse 
W H Robinson 




23, 
23, " 
23, " 


|| 


23, 
23 
23 




Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


George L. Wood 
Samuel McClelland. 
John F. Schute 
Albert C. Burgess 
Thomas T. Sweenev 
Judson \. Cross 


May 
\pril 


24, " 

20, " 
14, " 
14, | 


May 
Anril 


24 

20 
14 

11 | 




2d Lieutenant 
Do 


Albert C. Burgess 




29| 




29 *| 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 


Stephen Cole 


" 


. 





22 " 




Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Andrew F. Williams 
Arthur T. Wilcox 
Isaac N. Wilcox 
Elliott S. Quay 





23 . 
23, 


\ 


90 it 




Do. 


Edward T. Fitch 


" 


24) " 





24 " 




Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Oscar W. Sterl 
Dudley A. Kimball 
Ephraim H. Baker 


May 
April 


14, " 
29, " 


Mav 

April 


2< 
It " 





ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE 


F RANK. 


COM. I 


SSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


ERASTUS B. TYLER 


June 


19, 


1-01 


July 


2:>, 1861 


Appointed Brigadier-General May 20, 1862. 


Do 


WM. R. CREIGHTON 


May 


"II 




June 


10, 1862 


Killed at Mission Ridge, November 27, 


1863. 


Lt. Colonel.... 


WM. R. CREIGHTON 


June 


I 1 . , 


l-i-.i 


July 


19, 1861 


Promoted May 20, 1862. 




Do 
Do 


JOEL F. ASPEK 
ORRIN J. CRANE 


May 

Nov. 


20, 




June 
Dec. 


10, 1862 
4, " 


Resigned as Captain. 
Revoked. 




Do 


ORRIN J. CRANE 


March 


o* 


1863 


March 


12, 1863 


Killed at Mission Rider> November 27, 


18*>3. 


Do 


SAMUEL MCCLELLAND 


Dec. 


r, 




Dec. 


27, " 


Mustered out with regiment. 




Maior 


JOHN S. CASEMENT 


June 


19, 


*i 


July 




Resigned May 2;\ isfi.3. 




Do. . 


ORRIN J CR\NE. . 


Mav 


25, 


1 862 


Oct. 


6^ 1862 


Promoted to Jjicutcnftnt-Coloncl* 




Do 

Do 

Sur r ^on 


FREDERICK A. SEYMOUR 
FREDERICK A. SEYMOUR 
F SALTER 


March 

Aug. 


2, 
13, 

J) , 


)>-..", 
1 861 


June 
Ail?. 


22, 1863 

] ?; 18*61 


Revoked. 
Resigned March 29, 1S64. % 




Do 


CURTISS J. B.:I.LOWS 


Dec. 


1, 


! 562 


Dec. 


4* 1862 


Mustered out with regiment. 




Ass t Surgeon 


CHARLES K. DEMG 


Sept. 




.- .1 


Sept. 


9, 1861 


Resigned November 1, 1862. 




Do 


KLIZAR HITCHCOCK 


Nov 


111 




Nov. 


20, 1862 


Resigned June 2, LS63. 




Do 


WM. E. THOMPSON 


Starch 


12, 


1863 


March 


r>, 1863 


Declined ; returned commission. 




Do 


JOHN C. FERGUSON 


April 


14, 


* 4 


April 


14, ^ 


Mustered out with regiment. 




Do 


N BELUIVG 




29, 












Do 


DAVID WILLIAMS 


July 


is , 


" 


Jury 


is) " 


Promoted to Surgeon :">6th regiment O. 


V. I. 


Chaplain 


D. C. WRIGHT 


Jan. 


11, 


1862 


Jan. 


11, 1S62 


Resigned January 9, 1*63. 




Captain 


J. F. Asper 


June 


3 


1861 July 


2 \ 1861 


Promoted : resigned May 19, 1862. 




Du IGrrin J. Cran " 


13) 






.Mustered out for promotion Mav 24, 13 


52. 


Do Frederick J. Sevrnour 


41 


I i 


t 1 


it 


2") tl 


Resigned 




-l)o Giles W. Shurt liir. 


t 


j^- 


it 


t. 


.,>-, 1 1 


Resigned March 18, 1863. 




Do Uohn N. Dever 


11 


17, 


14 


" 


25 , " 


Killed at Battle of Cross Lanes Aug. 26 


, 1S5L 


Do 


Wm. R. Sterling 




17, 




" " 


Appointed Colonel 62.1 O. V. I. 
Mustered out JuTv 6, 1861. 




Do John F. Sehulte 





17. 







181 1. 



SEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



55 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATK OF RANK. COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Cantain . 
Do 
Do 
Do 

D<; ;;;;;;;;; 

Do 
D( 


Tunes T Sterling.. .. 


June 
Nov. 


18, 

1 . , 
25, 


1 .V-1 


July 
Nov. 


25! 
25, 


1861 


Discharged and app ted Lieut. Col. S>pt.l, 62. 
Resigned August IS, 1861. 
Honorably dis. Nov. 12, 18C2, acct. of wounds. 
Resigned July 9, 1862. 


Deicoust B. Clayton 
George L. Wood 


liulson N. Cross 
Charles A. Weed 
<amue1 McClelland 
Arthur T Wilcox 


Feb. 
May 
Julv 


5, 
20, 


1862 

1 >.V< 
1863 


Feb. 
.June 
Dec. 

May 
June 
May 


5, 
10, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
25, 

->\ 


1862 
1863 


Resigned February 19, lt 63. 
Promoted to Ma.ior. 
Mustered out July 6, 1.s64. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant Dec. 31, 1863 
Resigned January IS, 1S63. 
Mustered out July 6, 18t>4. 
Revoked. 

Mustered out Julv 6, 1864. 


Do 
Do 


Joseph B. Molyneaux 
A II Dav 


Sept. 
Nov. 


1, 


Do 
Do 
Do 


Mervin Clark 
Marcus S. Hopkins 
Win. A. 11. .we 


Sept. 
March 
Nov. 
Feb 


I, 

18, 
12, 


Do 


L R Davis 


March 

June 
Nov. 
June 

Oct. 
Nov. 

Feb. 

March 

April 
March 
April 

May 
June 


IV, 

l 1 , 

3, 
13, 

17! 

17, 

17, 
17, 
17, 
18, 

I . , 
19, 

1 .., 

v>\ 

30, 
5, 

"r. 
i, 
i, 

13. 

14, 
20, 

M, 


1861 

1862 
1861 

1862 


May 
March 

1 11110 
July 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

March 
Anril 
May 

June 

Dec. 


25 
25, 
19, 
19, 
19, 
19, 

4, 

25, 

25, 

25, 

31 1 

30^ 

20, 
10, 
1, 

4, 


l-. .l 

1862 
1861 

1 $62 


Mustered out December ID, 1664. 
Mustered out July 6, 1864. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out Julv 6, 1864. 
Mustered out July 6, 1864. 
Musten-d out Julv 6, 1864. 
Mustered out Julv 6, 1864. 
Resigned January 18, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Died. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned April 13, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned August 8, 1861. 
Resigned March 1, 1862. 
Resigned December 5, 1861. 
Resigned July 23, 1862. 
Resigned January 30, 1862. 
Honorably discharged November 12, 1862. 
Resigned July 25, 1862. 
Promoted by President. 
Resigned April 14, 1S62. 
Resigned November 6, 1862. 
ResiLMi-d April 13, 1862. 


Do 


Wm D Braden 


Do 
D< 


Stephen P. Loomis 


D< 
D( 
Do 
D( 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

fc 

Do. 


Harlow N. Spencer 
Christian Nesper 
George I). Lockwood 
Seymour S. Reed 
George L Wood 




Win H Robinson 


Judson N. Cross 


Charles A We^d 


Arthur T. Wilcox 


Samuel McClelland 
C. T. Nitchelm 
Joseph B. Molyneaux 
John B. Rouse 
Louis G. DeForrest 
John Morris 
loshuaG. Willis 
Halbert B. Case 


Ralph Lockwood 
E. Hudson Baker 

Elliott S Quay 


Oscar W Sterl 


Henry Z. Eaton 
Dudley A. Kimball 
A II Dav 




Resigned June 10, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned March 23, 1863. 
Mustered out November 1, 1862. 
Dismissed December 22, 1863. 


E J K reiser 


Win. B. Sheppard 
Seymour S. Reed 
Leicester King 


Mervin Clark 


Nov. 


- ;, 


1863 

1864 
1861 


Jan. 
May 

Jan. 

March 
July 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 


4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
10, 
25, 

26 
26, 
26, 
30, 
25, 
25, 
25, 


1864 
1863 

is. 1 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Declined promotion. 
Honorably discharged January 7, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed November 27, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out July 6, 1864. 
Mustered out Julv 6, 1864. 
Mustered out Julv 6, 1864. 
Mustered out July 6, 1864. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned September 6, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned November 28, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted February 20, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted March 1, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted April 1, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st. Lieutenant. 
Resigned April 13, 1862. 
Promoted April 14,1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted March 1, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted May 20, 18B2, to 1st Lieutenant. 


Wm.A. Howe 


L. R. Davis 
Wm. D. Braden 


July 

Sept. 
Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 
May 

Nov. 

M irch 
June 

Oct. 
Nov. 

Dec. 


i! 

6, 

i , 

l. 

i, 
i, 
i, 
i, 
30, 
3, 
17, 
17. 
17, 
17, 
17, 
17, 
19, 
19, 
19, 
1, 
25, 
25, 
1- , 


Henry W. Lincoln 










Harlow N. Spencrr 


Edward IT. Bohn 




Dwight II. Brown 
George C. Ketchum 

Halbert B. Case 


E. Hudson Baker 
Andrew J. Williams 


Edward F. Fitch 


r , 

25, 
25, 
9, 

%>\ 


Oscar W. Sterl 


Henrv Z. Eaton.... 


Dndlev A. Kimball 
\. H. Day 


Elliott S. Quav. 


Ezra H. Witler 
Wm. B. Sheppard 


Nivmour S. Reed 


James P. Brisbine 
Marcus S. Hopkins 


Feb. 
April 

March 
April 
May 
Aug. 

Nov. 
June 
July 

Nov. 


20, 
5, 

I M. 
1, 

13, 

13, 
1, 
14, 
20, 
21, 
9, 
9, 

10 , 

25, 
6, 


1862 
1863 


Feb. 

April 
May 

June 

Sept. 
Oct. 

Nov. 
Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 
Slay 


20, 

loj 

1, 

e) 

9, 
4, 

4, 
4, 

8, 

1. , 
7, 
25 

25, 


1862 
1863 


Killed Aug. 9, 1862, at battle Cedar Mountain. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed Aug. 9, 1862, at battle Cedar Mountain. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant . 
Killed Aug. 9, 1862, at battle Cedar Mountain. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Honorably discharged January 7, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Died June 21, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out July 6, 1864. 
Mustered out July 6, 1S64. 
Mustered out July 6, 1864. 
Mustered out July 6, 1864. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Mervin Clark 




Win. A . Howe 


L. R. Davis 
Joseph II. Ross 

Wm D Braden 


Stephen T. Loomis 
Harlow N. Spencer 
George D. Lockwood 
Henry W. Lincoln 
Geoige A McKay 


Wm. II. Howk 


Christian Nesper . .. 




Isaac C. Jones 


Edward II Bohn 


Morris Baxter 


Sept. 
Jan. 


12, 
1, 
7, 


Henrv M . Dean 


Dwight H. Brown 



56 OHIO IN THE WAE. 



SEVENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THIS organization may be termed one of the representative regiments of Ohio. Th< 
first Rebel gun fired on Fort Sumter was the signal for its assemblage. Its echo 
had scarcely died out in the North ere the seventy-five thousand men first called 
for by President Lincoln were in camp, eager to be led against_the rebellious foe; and among 
these enthusiastic patriots were those composing the Seventh Ohio. Its ranks were filled 
by the sturdy citizens of Northern Ohio. The city of Cleveland furnished three companies, 
Oberlin one, Warren one, Painesville one, Youngstown one, Norwalk one, and Franklin one, 
all of whom rendezvoused at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland; and on the 30th of April, 
1861, they were mustered into the service of the United States as the Seventh Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry. 

On a beautiful Sunday morning, early in May, this regiment, more than a thousand strong, 
marched into Cleveland, and down Euclid street to the railroad depot, where the cars were in 
readiness to transport them to Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati. It was there, in that then 
wretched camp, that the men of the Seventh Ohio experienced their first real practice of field 
service. The grounds were in their original state, cut up by baggage wagons, whose wheels had 
sunk deep into the miry mud, and left great fissures, filled with thick, gummy water, mixed 
with soil, through which the men were compelled to march, and on which, at night, they were 
expected to repose. The regiment was composed of men of high culture ministers of the 
gospel, students of theology and law, merchants, bankers, mechanics and farmers all used to 
the refinements of pleasant homes. But they made light of their surroundings, and went imme 
diately to work building huts in which to bivouac for the night. Before dark, a sufficient num 
ber were erected to shelter the whole command. 

In those early days of the war the men of the regiments selected their own officers, by 
ballot, a " democratic" way of " doing up the military " not tolerated in the latter and iron days 
of the rebellion. After the regiment had become settled in their new quarters, and somewhat 
accustomed to camp life, an election for field officers was held. E. B. Tyler, of Ravenna, Ohio, 
was chosen Colonel ; Wm. E. Creighton, of Cleveland, Lieutenant-Colonel ; John S. Casement, 
of Painesville, Major. 

The organization of the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry being completed, the drill and 
discipline of the regiment was next in order. This important and indispensable duty was per 
formed with intelligence and thoroughness by its officers, having in view, as they had, the stern 
ordeal through which their men would be called upon to pass. By the time the regiment had 
mastered the manual of arms, and become somewhat familiar with the regimental and battalion 
movements, the second call of President Lincoln for three hundred thousand men, to serve for 
three years, was issued. The regiment entered the three years service almost to a man, and the 
citizen s dress, which they had hitherto worn, gave place to the army blue. 

The men were allowed to visit their homes on a six days furlough, at the expiration of 
which time they were promptly in camp, and were duly mustered into the service of the United 



SEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 57 

States for three years. The privilege of sharing in the opening campaign in Western Virginia 
was allotted to this regiment, and on the 26th of June, 1861, it started for that field. 

The men went out of their camp with cheers and shouts of exultation, that at last they 
were to meet and combat the Rebels. On the following day the regiment reached Ben wood, 
Virginia, and for the first time set foot on Rebel soil. Here the men were furnished with 
ammunition. Various rumors were afloat respecting the movements of the enemy. Bridges 
had been destroyed and trains of cars fired into. 

The regiment was marched along the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Clarks 
burg, where tents were provided and transportation furnished, to enable the regiment to operate 
independently of lines of railroad. The first tented camp was formed at this place, and the 
regiment quietly settled down to the respective duties of its position. After being a few days in 
camp, Captain Schulte, commanding one of the companies, presented the regiment with a beau 
tiful stand of colors in behalf of the "Social Turn Verein " of Cleveland. This present was 
received with all the honors, the regiment going into line with presented arms. 

The 29th of June, 1861, will ever mark a memorable era in the annals of the Seventh Ohio. 
It was the first march the men had made with the shoulder knapsack and all the accoutermenta 
of the soldier. The day was oppressively hot, and before one mile had been laboriously over 
come, many valuable and useful articles, supposed to be absolutely indispensable, had become an 
intolerable burden ; and at three miles, when a halt was ordered, the men went deliberately to 
work reducing their baggage. Blankets, dress uniforms, books, under-clothing, and every article 
that could possibly be dispensed with, were emptied on the ground, and left there. One of the 
most useful articles, canteens, had not been supplied, and the men suffered dreadfully for the 
means of quenching their thirst. 

The rising of the morning sun revealed to the men their destination. Twenty -three miles 
had been made, and the little town of Weston reached. The object of the march was accom 
plished, which was to receive sixty-five thousand dollars in gold, that had been deposited in the 
bank at Weston by the Virginia State Government, to defray the expense of erecting a large 
lunatic asylum at that place. No opposition was made. The money was secured, and the regi 
ment went into camp. 

On the 4th of July the people of Weston or the Union portion of the town gave a fine 
dinner to the regiment. Before the men had fully recovered from the fatigue of the march, and 
ere the blisters on their feet had healed, news came that the Rebels were in force near Glen- 
ville, twenty-eight miles distant, and had surrounded a detachment of the Seventeenth Ohio, 
who occupied that place. The Seventh was called upon to march to the relief of this beleaguered 
force. After a day s hard marching, Glenville was reached, but the Rebels had fled. 

At Glenville the army rations gave out, which rendered it necessary to abandon the oppos 
ing theory and adopt confiscation. The consciences of the officers and men were somewhat 
sensitive at first, but hunger soon dissipated all qualmish scruples, and taking supplies became 
a solemn duty with all. No organized enemy appeared at this place, though hostile demonstra 
tions were occasionally made by bushwhackers. One man of the regiment was wounded while 
on picket duty, and an officer had his horse shot from under him. The time was principally 
occupied in drilling, scouting and confiscating. 

The plan of the campaign was that the Seventh Ohio should open up communication with 
General Cox, who at that time was making his way up the Kanawha Valley. Situated as the 
Seventh was, in the midst of an enemy s country, far away from any base of supply, and in a 
mountainous district, this duty was a most difficult one to perform. By hard marching, encamp 
ing respectively at Bulltown, Salt Lake and Flatwood, the regiment reached Sutton, at which 
place, as a precautionary measure, it threw up fortifications on a bluff overhanging the town, 
which afterward proved of service to other regiments. Owing to the nature of the country, and 
want of knowledge of its peculiarities, the regiment felt its way cautiously, sometimes remain 
ing a week in camp, to enable scouting parties to go forward and explore the way, and gain all 
possible information of the movements of the enemy. Passing on from Sutton, the regiment 



58 OHIO IN THE WAR 

reached Cross Lanes on the 15th of August, having encamped, in its route, at Birch Mountain 
and Summerville. The time passed at Cross Lanes was occupied in drilling, scouting and doing 
guard and picket duty. Prior to this time an officer and two men had been captured by Eebel 
cavalry, and a scouting party had been attacked, one of whom was killed and three wounded. 

Just after tattoo, on the evening of the 21st of August, a dispatch was received from General 
Cox, ordering the Seventh to join him, without delay, at Gauley Bridge. The long roll was 
sounded ; the men sprang to their places in line, and in an hour s time the regiment was on its 
march to fulfill the order. 

"While the Seventh Ohio Avas encamped at Twenty-mile Creek, near General Cox s position, 
it was ascertained that General Floyd, with four thousand men, was preparing to cross the Gau 
ley River at Cross Lanes, the place the regiment had so recently left. A countermarch was im 
mediately ordered, and the regiment returned in the direction of their old camp. When within 
six miles of Cross Lanes (August 24th), the pickets of the enemy were encountered. The 
further advance of the regiment was made with great precaution, to guard against surprise, but 
no enemy in force was discovered. During the night the regiment bivouacked in the vicinity of 
its old camping ground. The entire regiment was ordered on picket duty, each company to 
occupy designated positions, with instructions to fall back under cover of each other if attacked 
by a force they could not repel. 

The firing of the pickets at daybreak aroused the men to arms. In a few minutes the 
enemy was seen approaching in line of battle. The companies of the Seventh Ohio, acting inde 
pendently of each other, took position on neighboring hills, and, though pressed against by 
overwhelming numbers, tenaciously held their positions, until, at last, they were forced to 
retreat, leaving the field and the dead and wounded in possession of the enemy. The loss of the 
regiment in this unfortunate affair was one hundred and twenty killed, wounded, and prisoners. 
The regiment became scattered, one-half finding its way back to Gauley, the remainder coming 
into the National lines near Charleston, several miles down the river. 

While at Gauley, the regiment was presented with a beautiful stand of colors by Professor 
N. E. Peck, of Oberlin College, in behalf the people of the Western Reserve. 

After the battle of Carnifex Ferry, the forces under General Cox advanced to Dogwood Gap, 
with the view of intercepting the retreat of General Floyd ; but the movement was unsuccessful, 
and the expedition returned to the old camp at Gauley. 

On the 16th of October, Colonel Dyer was placed in command at Charleston, and the Sev 
enth Ohio was ordered thither, where it remained until the 1st of November. At that date the 
enemy was again threatening the force at Gauley. The Seventh Ohio was ordered to join Gen 
eral Benham s forces, then stationed at Loup Creek. The plan was for this force to make its 
way to the rear of Floyd, and thus entrap him. General Benham s disobedience of orders led 
to the failure of the plan, Floyd making good his escape. A hot pursuit was made, but the only 
success was the capture of Colonel Cragan and several of his men. The incessant and heavy 
rains, and consequent deep mud, coupled with the necessary exposure of the men, rendered this 
march one of extreme severity and suffering. 

The Seventh was now returned, by steamer, to Charleston, November 17, 1861. 

The campaign in Western Virginia for the winter having ended, the Seventh was ordered 
to join the army under General Lander, who then occupied Romney, in Central Virginia. Ac 
cordingly, the regiment, on the 10th of December, 1861, took steamer at Charleston, and, pass 
ing down the Kanawha to the Ohio River, landed at Parkersburg, where it took rail for Green 
Spring River. From thence, after a march of sixteen miles, it found itself in an entirely new 
field, and much nearer the enemy. 

A large force under General Jackson, forming the left wing of the Rebel army, was in camp 
at Winchester. Jackson anticipated and thwarted the movement that was about to be made 
against him from different points, by attacking the National forces separately and unexpectedly. 
When Jackson advanced on Romney, in mid-winter, General Lander withdrew the National 
forces to Patterson Creek, a small place on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, a short distance 



SEVENTH OHIO INFANTKY. 59 

from Cumberland. The retreat began at night, in the midst of a severe rain-storm, and ended 
by pitching tents in a mudhole. This camp was the most wretched and illy chosen the men 
had ever occupied, and dire were the maledictions uttered against those who had committed the 
foolish blunder. And yet the men did not suffer from ill health or epidemics. 

Jackson entered and occupied Romney the day after the National forces had withdrawn. 
Lander s force remained in camp at Patterson s Creek nearly a month, Jackson still occupying 
Romney. On the 5th of February, 1862, a move was made to entrap Jackson s force. With 
this design, the Seventh Ohio was sent by rail to French s Store, and from thence a distance of 
twenty miles, to a point on the road between Romney and Winchester, with the hope of inter 
cepting the retreat of Jackson, which had been anticipated. The point was reached, but the 
enemy had escaped. This march was one of intense suffering to the men. It was begun on a 
cold winter night, and by noon on the day following the men were almost exhausted, when the 
return march was ordered. The regiment returned to within eight miles of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad, where it bivouacked on the Heights of Hampshire, and remained there 
ten days. This was in the middle of winter. The winds were boisterous, the snow was ten 
inches deep, and the cold intense. The regiment was without tents, and hardly averaged a 
blanket for every two men ; was on short rations, and had no cooking utensils. The only pro 
tection from the cold that could be obtained was a sort of hut ingeniously formed of rails and 
brush, which, together with huge bonfires, kept the men from freezing, although it did not shield 
them from suffering. 

From Hampshire Heights the regiment advanced east to Pawpaw Station, near which it 
encamped, and remained until the opening of spring. It was here that the army met with a 
great loss, in the death of General Lander, a noble, brave and earnest patriot. All the troops 
in the vicinity were assembled to do honor to the departed hero. The Seventh Ohio escorted 
his remains to the railroad cars to be conveyed to Washington. 

General Shields succeeded General Lander in the command of the division. About the 7th 
of March the spring campaign opened, and the whole division advanced via Martinsburg to a 
point four miles north of Winchester. General Banks had already occupied Winchester with 
out a battle, as Jackson hastily withdrew on the approach of the National troops. Shields 
division made a reconnoissance to Strasburg, twenty -two miles distant. A few rounds of artil 
lery were fired ; but the enemy making but little opposition, the division returned from whence 
it started, marching the whole distance in a little more than four hours. This move served to 
draw out Jackson, who had concentrated his forces at a point four miles distant from Winches 
ter. The Rebel artillery opened on the National advance (March 23, 1862), as a challenge to 
a general engagement. This was really the commencement of the first battle of Winchester. 

Shields division was immediately called out, and advanced to the front, eager for the fight. 
The morning was consumed in skirmishing and reconnoitering, the two armies gradually ap 
proaching each other. By three o clock in the afternoon the whole line became furiously 
engaged, and continued so until dark, at which time the battle ended. The Seventh Ohio per 
formed an important part in this battle, and added to its reputation for efficiency. Its loss 
was fourteen killed, fifty-one wounded, and several prisoners. Colonel E. B. Tyler, its com 
mander, received from the Secretary of War a commission as Brigadier-General of Volunteers, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Creighton succeeding him in command of the regiment. 

General Shields division moved up the Shenandoah to Harrisonburg, but finding no suita 
ble ground for encampment, it fell back a few miles, and took a strong position near New Mar 
ket. Remaining here a few days, an order was received from the War Department to join the 
forces of General McDowell, then stationed at Fredericksburg. On this march no tents were 
allowed the men, and only six baggage wagons to a regiment. 

The division began its march on the 12th of May, and nine days thereafter reached its des 
tination, a distance of one hundred and thirty-two miles. This long and weary march almost 
utterly exhausted the men ; and, foot-sore, ragged and dirty, they threw themselves on the 
ground in an improvised camp, and rested until the next day. In the morning of the day 



60 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

following, President Lincoln and other Government officials arrived from Washington, and a 
review was ordered. Mr. Lincoln having expressed a desire to see the men who had whipped 
Jackson and driven him out of the Shenandoah Valley, Shields division was ordered out with 
the rest, and went through with another day of exhaustive duty. 

Having received heavy reinforcements from Richmond, Jackson re-entered the Shenandoah 
Valley, left open by the withdrawal of Shields division, meeting with but slight opposition from 
General Banks, who then occupied a portion of the Valley. Jackson made a direct march 
toward Washington. This bold raid necessitated the abandonment of the move on Richmond. 
Shields division was immediately ordered to march back to the Valley and intercept Jackson in 
his retreat, and, if possible, capture him and his army. The troops at Fredericksburg were put 
in motion, and a large force under General Fremont moved forward from another direction in 
pursuit of Jackson. That enterprising Rebel General, aware of the great efforts being made to 
entrap him, made a hasty retreat up the Valley, and a hotly-contested race ensued. This pur 
suit was continued until Jackson made a stand at Cross Keys, where he engaged Fremont in a 
battle which resulted against him. 

By this time the Third and Fourth Brigades of Shields division had, by forced marches, 
reached a point opposite Port Republic. The advance, under Colonel Carroll, was driven back 
and prevented from occupying the town or destroying the bridge across the Shenandoah, as 
directed. By the time General Tyler came up the Rebel General had arranged a heavy force to 
meet him. At five o clock the next morning Jackson commenced the assault, and was promptly 
met by the National forces, with a resistance that would have been creditable to an army of ten 
thousand men. The Seventh, in connection with the Fifth Ohio, bore the brunt of the fight, and 
became the rallying center of the battle. These two regiments fought splendidly and effectively. 
General Tyler, seeing the terrible odds against him, and the extent of the enemy s lines, deter 
mined to handle his inadequate force with extreme caution, and met the wily Stonewall with his 
own favorite tactics of strategy and cunning. Taking advantage of a wheat field near the enemy s 
center, he extended his lines from hill to river, and double-quicked the Fifth and Seventh from 
point to point along the line, under cover of some standing wheat, halting at intermediate points 
to deliver a galling fire. This was kept up for five long hours ; and, with less than three thou 
sand muskets, the National forces repelled Jackson, with fourteen thousand veteran Rebel 
troops. 

General Tyler ordered a retreat, with the Seventh Ohio as the rear guard. That regiment 
performed this perilous duty with great gallantry, coming off the field in line, loading as they 
marched, at intervals halting and firing by the rear rank into the advancing columns of Jackson. 
The National forces retreated toward Washington, while Jackson s army shortly after fell back 
on the main Rebel army near Richmond. 

By the 28th of June, Shields division had reached Alexandria, on the Potomac, and on 
the same day embarked for the Peninsula as a reinforcement to General McClellan, then opera 
ting against Richmond. The Third and Fourth Brigades of this division having been greatly 
reduced, both by forced marches and losses in battle, the War Department decided to send only 
the First and Second Brigades. The other two were ordered to disembark and go into camp 
near Alexandria, where it remained until the latter part of July, when it joined the forces of 
General Banks, at Little Washington. While lying at that place, General Tyler was ordered to 
report to Washington, and the Seventh Ohio lost their old and loved commander. 

General Geary succeeded General Tyler in the command of the brigade. The ever-mem 
orable campaign of 1862 was about opening. General John Pope assumed command of the 
Army of Virginia. On the morning of August 9th, General Banks corps, to which the Seventh 
Ohio belonged, reached Culpepper, having marched all of the previous night. After an hour s 
rest it marched five miles further, near to Cedar Mountain, a point then held by Stonewall 
Jackson. The Rebels were in high spirits over their successes on the Peninsula, and seemed 
determined to make an attack on the National Capital. A great portion of the day was spent 
in reconnoitering. About three o clock P. M. the battle was opened by General Banks corps. 



SEVENTH OHIO INFANTKY. 61 

It had not advanced far when it was ascertained that the Rebels had greatly the advantage, in 
being protected by thick woods, while the National force was obliged to pass through an open 
field, every part of which was in full range of the enemy s guns. With steady ranks the Na 
tional column marched boldly up to the woods where the opposing force was concealed. The 
action became general along the whole line. The Seventh Ohio was advanced to the front, and 
became at once engaged in a fierce hand-to-hand struggle. The shades of evening closed in on 
this bloody scene, when the National forces retired a short distance and bivouacked for the 
night. 

Of three hundred men engaged in the Seventh Ohio, only one hundred escaped unhurt. 
No decided advantage was gained by either side in this hard-fought battle. General Lee s whole 
army approached, and the National forces were compelled to fall back on Washington. Then 
commenced a season of hardship and trial. For over a month the men were constantly engaged 
in marching and fighting. On the 17th of September the National army reached Antietam. 
Although on the field during the battle, the Seventh was not in the front line, and, therefore, its 
loss was comparatively slight. 

Shortly after the battle of Antietam, the brigade to which the Seventh was attached went 
into camp on Bolivar Heights. While at this point, about two hundred recruits joined the reg 
iment, which had, by its losses in battle, been reduced from one thousand men to less than three 
hundred. 

On the 10th of December the brigade broke camp, and marched toward Fredericksburg to 
join the grand army under General Hooker. Before reaching its destination, counter-orders 
were received to encamp at Dumfries. Both armies went into winter-quarters, and all was quiet. 
But the force at Dumfries was not allowed to remain undisturbed. In the latter part of Decem 
ber, on a bleak, cold day, Stuart s cavalry, with two pieces of artillery, suddenly appeared be 
fore Dumfries, evidently with the intention of surprising and capturing its garrison. No sooner 
had the pickets signaled the approach of the enemy, than every man of the Seventh was under 
arms, ready to repel the enemy. The contest was brief. The enemy was driven off with con 
siderable loss. 

The quiet of the camp was not again disturbed until April 20th, 1863, when, in obedience 
to orders, the brigade marched toward Chancellorsville, with eight days rations. The march 
occupied ten days. The day after the arrival of the Seventh the battle of Chancellorsville 
opened. The Seventh was ordered to support a battery, and latterly a line of skirmishers that 
had been thrown forward. The skirmishers soon fell back to the main body, but the Seventh 
continued to advance until it was ordered to retreat. Early on the following morning it occupied 
a line of rifle-pits exposed to a terrible cross-fire from the enemy. About noon it was ordered 
back to its former position. While here, the rest of the National forces had withdrawn, leaving 
the Seventh, with two other regiments, to cover the retreat. Its conduct in this hazardous and 
responsible position, and its gallant action in the battle, reflected the highest honor on not only 
the regiment, but the State from whence it came. The loss of the Seventh Ohio in this battle 
was fourteen men killed and seventy wounded. 

An interim of a few days ensued, during which both armies were engaged in reorganizing 
their forces and recuperating their strength. Then came the race for Maryland and Pennsyl 
vania. On the 1st of June, 1863, the Seventh, after a tedious and hard march, reached Gettys 
burg, Pennsylvania, and took its position on the left of the National lines. During the battle, 
the regiment was ordered from point to point, where and when reinforcements were most needed. 
Its loss was small, owing to the protection of breastworks, of which it availed itself in the hot 
test part of the battle. It lost but one man killed and seventeen wounded. 

Troops were now dispatched to New York to quell the riots ; and, among other regiments 
sent, was the Seventh Ohio. Taking steamers at Alexandria, it, with two others of the same 
brigade, landed on Governor s Island, in New York Harbor, on the 26th of August, and went 
into camp. 

About the 1st of September, 1863, the draft being over in New York, the Seventh returned 



62 OHIO IN THE WAE. 

to and occupied the old camp on the Rapidan, and remained there until the latter part of the 
month. At that time, the Twelfth Army Corps, to which it was attached, together with the 
Eleventh Corps, were ordered to the Western Department. These two corps were afterward 
consolidated, forming the Twentieth Corps, under the command of General Jos. Hooker. Its 
route was through Washington City, via the Baltimore and Ohio Kailroad, through Columbus, 
Indianapolis, Louisville, Nashville, to Wartrace, Tennessee, where it was ordered to construct 
winter-quarters. Before, however, these quarters were fully completed, the brigade to which 
the Seventh belonged was ordered to Bridgeport, Alabama. 

It had been determined by General Grant, who was then in command of the department, to 
drive the Rebels from their stronghold on Lookout Mountain, and for that purpose nearly all 
the troops in his command were concentrated at or near Bridgeport. The Seventh Ohio was 
ordered to leave its comfortable winter-quarters, and joined the troops at Bridgeport. It was 
not brought under fire until it arrived at the foot of the mountain, at a point where the forma 
tion of the ground was such as to shield the men from the fire of the enemy. The guns on 
the top of the mountain could not be depressed sufficiently to take effect. In order, there 
fore, to harass the National troops as much as possible, the Rebels shot off the tops of the 
trees, that they might fall on their heads as they toiled up the slope. This lofty and rugged 
mountain, with the enemy intrenched upon its summit, would have presented an obstacle seem 
ingly insurmountable to an army less disciplined, or one in want of patriotic zeal to inspire it. 
Moving further up, the assaulting force was exposed to a severe musketry fire. A heavy fog 
soon enveloped the whole mountain, and the firing ceased. At early dawn the enemy had dis 
appeared, and the Stars and Stripes were planted upon the highest pinnacle of the mountain. 

The National army, fully alive to their great victory, swarmed down the mountain, across 
the plains of Chattanooga, and up the sides of Mission Ridge, in pursuit of the enemy, but only 
to meet with a feeble resistance. The enemy fled, pursued hotly through the day, which was 
crowned with the capture of two thousand prisoners. The troops were in high spirits, and rent 
the air with their jubilant cheers. The pursuit was continued until the 27th of November, 
when the enemy posted himself in a strong position, called Taylor s Ridge, just beyond Ring- 
gold, in order to prevent the National forces from passing through Thompson s Gap. Geary s 
brigade was ordered to storm the heights. It formed in tAvo columns, on the railroad, half a 
mile north of the Gap, the Seventh Ohio occupying the right of the rear column. 

The assault commenced. Just as the steep declivity was reached, the advance was halted 
to return the enemy s fire. The rear column passed over it, and entered a gorge that was 
directly in front. At this point the gallant Creighton shouted to his regiment: "Boys, we are 
ordered to take that hill ; I want to see you walk right up to it!" And up they went, in the face 
of a merciless fire in front, on right and left. Only one commissioned officer of the Seventh 
Ohio was left uninjured. It was a fearful repulse, and all that was left the shattered remnant 
was to fall back to the foot of the hill. 

The loss of the regiment was very severe. Nineteen were killed and sixty-one wounded. 
No positive advantage was gained, and the army fell back and encamped at Chattanooga. This 
gallant charge cost the Seventh Ohio dearly. Two of its best and bravest officers went down 
before the fearful storm of bullets. The fiery Creighton and the unflinching Crane were killed, 
together with a score of noble and daring comrades. At this inauspicious time the question of 
re-enlisting was presented to the members of the Seventh Ohio. Is it to be wondered that the 
proposition was not favorably considered by these war-worn soldiers ? 

This brings the history of the Seventh Ohio up to the 1st of January, 1864, at which time 
it was again in its old camp at Bridgeport, Alabama. Here it spent the winter in comparative 
quiet, with the exception of a few slight skirmishes, in which a few prisoners were captured. 
On the 3d of May, the regiment left Bridgeport, under orders, and, passing in the vicinity of 
Lookout Mountain, Ringgold, and Taylor s Ridge, it reached Rocky Face Ridge on the 8th of 
May. At this place the enemy was found intrenched, but he was soon routed by Hooker s 
corps. At Resaca the enemy again made a stand, and were again driven, and pursued until the 



SEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 63 

llth of June, with but slight loss to either side. This was the last service performed by the 
Seventh Ohio as a regiment. It was ordered home to be mustered out. The recruits, whose 
term of service had not yet ended, were consolidated with the Fifth Ohio, and participated, with 
that gallant regiment, in the brilliant and successful march of Sherman, through Georgia and 
South Carolina, to the sea. 

The Seventh proceeded by rail to Nashville ; thence by steamer to Cincinnati. There the 
Fifth Ohio was met ; and, as the citizens of Cincinnati were about to tender that regiment a 
reception, the Seventh was invited to participate. The long and intimate relations between these 
two regiments the one representing the northern and the other the southern portion of the 
State made it doubly pleasant thus to meet and spend a few hours in social intercourse, at the 
close of these long years of hardship and trial spent in the service of their country. 

On Saturday, June 24, 1864, the regiment took its departure for Cleveland, and on the 8th 
of July, 1864, was there mustered out of the service. 

The Seventh had served a little more than three years. During that time, eighteen hun 
dred men had served with it ; and now, save some sixty new recruits transferred to the Veteran 
Corps, only two hundred and forty able-bodied men remained to bring home their unsullied 
colors, pierced through by the shot and shell of more than a score of battles. The regiment 
performed an important part in the war. Enlisting, as it did, at the very outset of the rebell 
ion, it was kept well in the van during most of its service, and was present at most of the 
severely-contested battles of the war. Its losses were severe in both officers and men ; yet in 
all the trying scenes through which it passed, it was ever the same brave, ready, and enduring 
body of soldiers. 



64 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



8th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 
Surgeon 
Ass r t Surgeon. 
Captain 
Bo 
Do 
Do 
Do 


HERMIN G. DKPUY 
FRKEMAN E. FRANKLIN 


May 
April 

Mav 

April 


4, 1S61 

4, " 

4, " 
2, " 
2, " 
6, " 
18, " 
20, " 
20, " 
8, 
19, " 
22, " 
22, " 
.5, " 

"ej " 

18, " 
20, " 
20, " 
8, " 
19, " 
22, " 
22, " 
/>, " 
23, " 


May 

May 
April 

*i y " 

May 
April 


4, 1861 

4, " 
4, " 
2, " 
2 r " 
6, " 
18, " 
20, " 
20, " 
8, " 
19, || 

T i 

23, || 

is " 

20, " 
20, " 
8, " 
19, " 
22, " 
22, " 
.5, " 
23, " 
6, " 
18, " 
20, " 
20, " 
9, " 
19, || 

H! " 
23, " 




BENJ. TAI-PAN 

S SFXTOV 


Ezra W. Clapp.jr 
Win. Kinnev 
Francis W. Butteriield 
Franklin Sawyer _ 
James E. Gregg 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
let Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Oo. M. Tillottson 
Wm. K. Havs 
Wm. W, Starr 
Elizur G. Johnson 
Wilbur F. Pierce 
Benj F Ogle 




Enoch W. Meinnian 


John Bixbv 
Chas. M. Fouke 
Edward D. Dickinson 
Clrirlos A Park 


Lewis Brcckin ridge 
Henry W. Fritzs 


Chas. W. Barnes 


April 


18, " 
20, " 
20, " 
9, " 

iy, " 

23, 






Alfred S. Craig 




Harry C. Landon 
David W. Hougliton 

Otis Shaw jr 





ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Major 


HERMIN G. DEPUY 
S. S. CARROLL 
CHARLES A. PARK 
CHARLES A. DF.VJLLIERS... 
FRANKLIN SAWYER 
FR \NKI.IN SVWYFR 


July S, 1861 
Pec. 7, " 
July s, " 
June 26, " 
Nov. 2. r >, " 
July 8, " 
Nov. 25, " 
Sept. 7, " 
Nov. 27, " 
March .% " 
Julv 8, " 
Dec. i:$, 1862 
Aug. 11, 1863 
July 9, 1861 
Feb. 9, 1863 
June 4, 1861 

9 | it 

" !?; : 
:: \l; 
" 15: : 

July 9, " 

Nov!""2K."ixt; i 
Feb. 6, 1H6L 
March 11, " 
Nov. 27, " 
Jan. l.i, 18f,3 
20, " 
March 4, " 
3, 1864 
3, 

April 22 , " 


July 8, 1861 
Dec. 7, " 
July S, " 
June 2ti, " 
Nov. 2.3, " 
July 8, || 
Nov. 2.5. 
Sept. 7, " 
Dec. 3, " 
March f., " 
Jan. 11, 1862 
10, 1863 
Aug. 11, " 
July 9, 1861 
Feb. 9, 1863 
June 4, 1861 
5, " 
" 5, " 
9, " 
" 10, " 
17, " 
" 18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
" 18, " 
July 9, " 
Aug. 30, " 
Nov. 25, " 
March 20, 1862 
April 11, " 
Dec. 31, " 
Feb. 16, 1863 
16, " 
April 7, " 
March 3, 1864 
3, 
3, " 
April 22, " 


Resigned November 9, 1861. [out with regt. 
Wounded at bat. of Spottsylvania ; mustered 
Resigned November 4, 1861. 
Elected Colonel Eleventh Regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned November 26, 1.SC1. 
Resigned January 2, 1S63. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned October 23, 1862. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Honorably discharged November 27, 1S62. 
Resigned July 8, 1864. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Not mustered in. 
Resigned March 11, 1862. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Died March 4, 1863. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out for promotion, Nov. 3, 1362. 
Resigned February 6, 1862. 
Resigned December 13, 1862. 
Resigned November 27, 1862. 
Cashiered February 1, l.MJ">. 
Honorably discharged January 8, 1861 
Honorably discharged August 4, 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Honorably discharged November 20, 1863. 
Missing after battle of Wilderness. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 


AMIERT II. WINSLOW 

W II L\MMK 


Do 
Do 

Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 


THOMAS McE BRIGHT 
J. L. BRENTON 
S SEXTON 


FREEMAN A. TUTTLE 
J. S. POLLOCK 


LYM\N N FRKEMAN 


Do 
Captain 
Do 
Do 

Do 


ALEX MILLER 
Albert H. Winslow 
Francis W. Butteriit-U 
Wilbur F. Pierce 
Elizur G. Johnson . . 


Do 


Oran 11. Kelsea 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


James E. Gregg 
Wm. Kinnev 
George M. Tillottson 
Franklin Sawver 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. , 


William E. Jlavnes 
Daniel C. Daggatt 


Richard Allen 
Benjamin F. Ogle 
John Reed 
Willis W. Miller 


Do 
Do 


George S. Smith 
David Lewi* 


Do 
Do 
Do 


Azor II. Nickerson 
Alfred S Craig 


Edward I). Dickinson 
James K. O Riley 
John G Roo<i 


Wm. W. Withered 



EIGHTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



65 



BANTi. 


NAME. 


DATE O 


" RANK. 


COM. I 


SSUED. 


REMARKS. 


let Lieutenant 


Benj. F. Ogle 


June 


4, 1SI 1 


June 


4, 1861 


Promoted to Captain. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do 


David Lewis 
Henry W. Frit/8 





s! 

i| 


;; 


5, " 
5, " 


Promoted to C aptain. 
Resigned .hme M, i>,-,2. 


Do 


(. has \ Park. . . 


(| 


10 


n 


10 " 




Do 


Win Delanv 


(4 


Is 


it 


18 " 




Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Willis W. Miller 
Chas. 31. Fnuke 
Edward D. Dickinson 
Daniel C. Daggatt 
Philo W Chase . 


" 


17, 

IS, 
18, 
IS, 
28 


!, 


17, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
28 " 


Promoted to Captain March 11, 1si2. 
Honorably discharged January 7, 1663. 
Mustered tmt with regiment. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Do 


James R Swi^ert 


July 


(3 


July 


6 " 




Do 


John Reed 




9 








Do 


Win M Pe uve 


\ U (T 










Do. 
Do 


G. Shillito Smith 
Clns W Barnes 


Nov. 
Feb 




Nov. 




Promoted to Captain. [17, 1862. 


Do. 


Alfred P. Craig 


March 


H, 


April 


10 , " 


Promoted to Captain. 


Do 






26* 






Died Julv 3 lsr*J 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


( rei^htoii Thompson 
James K. O Kiley 
John G. Heed 


June 

Sept. 
Oct. 


16, 

7! 

I 




15, 
15, 
15, 
15 


Mustered out Aus.31, 62; resigned Feb. 10, ? 63. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Do! 
Do. 


Win. W. Witherell 
Jacob P. Hysung 


Feb. 


17, 
It 1W3 


Feb. 


16, 18( 3 
16 


Promoted to Captain. 


Do . 


Henry A. Farnum 




7 


|| 


16 




Do 


David R Wallace 




20 


l| 


16 


Revoked 


Do 




u 


15 


( ( 


16 




Do 


John W Depuy 


March 


4 


\pril 


7 


t - ? t * 1 1 . +* 


Do 




Jan 


20 




23 * 


M t - 1 f f 1 * iT +* 


Do 


Chas iMannahan 


March 


3 lbf-1 


March 


3 1864 


D * 


Do 


John W Travis. 




3 






AT f ^ 1 f *f V * f 


Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Thomas II. Thornbaugh.... 
Oramel G. Daniels 


; 


3, 
3, 
3 





3, 

3 " 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with reiriment. 




(lias W Barnes 




4 1M 1 


* 






Do 






5 


t t 


5 " 




Do 




i 




tt 


5* " 




Do 


David W. Houghton 


i 


q* 


it 






Do. 


Philo W. Chase 





l6| 


" 


10) " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 
Do 


Alfred P. Craig 


, 


18* 


n 


18 " 


Killed at Antietam September 17 1862 


Do 


\nthony S. Sutton 


t 


18 


II 


18 " 




Do 


Edwnrd W. Cook 


4 


18 


n 


18 " 




Do. 
Do 


Creighton Thompson 
Ohas \V Wright 


, 


28* 


|| 


18, " 
28 " 


Promoted June 16, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned March 11 1S6 9 


Do. 


Herman Rness 


July 


8, 


July 


8, " 


Promoted Oct. 1, lsi)2; discharged Oct 17 62 


Do. 


Azor H. Nickerson 








30, " 


Promoted April 2<, 1862. 


Do. 
Do 


John G. Reed 


Feb. 
March 


21 , IM > 
U 


March 
April 


20, 1862 
10 " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Win. W. Witherell 
Henry A. Farnum 
David R Wallace 


Feb. 


11, 
6, 
29 


May 


?::: 

3 " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Dismissed March A3 1863 


Do. 


Horace 11. Bills 




26 




1 " 


Killed September 17 1862 


Do. 
Do 


John W. Depuy 


Sept. 


1, 
11 


Oct" 


15, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 




Sept 


7 


it 


lo " 




Do 




Oct 





ii 


15 " 




Do! 
Do 


Robert L. McConnell 


June 

Nov 


16, 


Nov 


15, " 

7 " 


Honorably discharged December 9, 1863. 




Thomas II. Thornbaugh.... 
Oramel G. Daniels 


Jan. 

Oct. 


7, IS 3 
17 


Feb. 


16, 1863 
16 " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


T*o 


Stephen Strange 


Jan. 


20 


| 


16 " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


D"> 


David S. Koons 




15 


1C 


16 " 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Do. 
Do. 


Lester V. McKisson 
Lucien Abbott 


March 
Jan 


4, 
20 


April 
Jan 


23* " 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Transferred to Fourth Battalion. 

















VOL. II. 5. 



66 OHIO IN THE WAB. 



EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTKY was originally organized 
as a three months regiment, under the first call of the President, most of the companies 
having been enlisted between the 16th and 22d days cf April, 1861, and all of them arriv 
ing at Camp Taylor, Cleveland, as early as April 29th. 

On the 2d of May, all the companies having been mustered into the service, the regiment 
was ordered to Camp Dennison, where it arrived on the 3d, during a drenching rain, and many 
of the men, for the first time in their lives, slept in the open air, with only a soldier s blanket 
for floor, roof, walls, and bedclothes. 

The regimental organization was here completed by the appointment of the field and 
staff officers. 

Instructions in the " drill " now commenced, and vigorous efforts were put forth to fit the 
regiment for service ; but it soon became evident that the troops at this camp would not be sent 
to the field as three months men, and an effort was made to re-enlist the regiment for three 
years. To this every company responded except company I, and the regiment of nine compa 
nies was mustered into the service for three years on the 22d, 25th, and 26th of June. 

In the following September company I joined the regiment at Grafton, Virginia. 

On the ninth day of July, 1861, the regiment left Camp Dennison for Grafton, Virginia, 
and on the 12th arrived at West Union, Preston county, Virginia, on the summit of the Alle- 
ghany Mountains where they are crossed by the Great Western Turnpike, and along which Gar- 
nett s Rebel army was then being rapidly driven by McClellan s troops. 

For some weeks after this the regiment was stationed at various places among the mount 
ains and along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, during which time it suffered severely from 
typhoid fever, which the men believed to have been contracted at a camp which they will long 
remember as " Maggotty Hollow." At one time over three hundred were in hospital, and some 
thirty-four deaths resulted from the fever in a short space of time. 

On the 24th of September the regiment participated in an attack on Romney. At the 
" Hanging Rock" it was exposed to a severe fire, and lost several men in killed, and a number 
wounded. The regiment again participated in an attack on Romney, October 24th ; which, 
being evacuated by the enemy, was occupied by the troops under General Kelley until the 12th 
of January, 1862. From this place the regiment participated in a brisk and successful attack 
on Blue s Gap. General Lander assumed command of the department and removed the troops 
to Patterson s Creek in January, and in February to Pawpaw Tunnel. On the 14th of February 
the Eighth participated in a brisk fight at Bloomey Gap, in which Colonel Baldwin, with his 
staff and part of his command were captured. The gallant Lander died on the 2d of March, 
and shortly after the division moved to the Shenandoah Valley, where General Shields took 
command. The enemy having evacuated Winchester, Shields followed them up the Valley, and 
on the 18th and 19th of March fought sharply at Cedar Creek and Strasburg. In these actions 
the Eighth acted as skirmishers, and established at once a reputation for that kind of duty, which 
it maintained throughout its term of service. 



EIGHTH OHIO INFANTRY. 67 

On the 22d the outposts at Winchester were attacked by Ashby, and in a brisk battle Gen 
eral Shields was severely wounded. The next day the battle of Winchester was fought. But 
few of the troops had ever been under fire, and none of them, as then organized, in any serious 
engagements. Colonel Kimball commanded, and made his arrangements to whip Stonewall 
Jackson, who had arrived during the night. The battle was one of the most severe of the war. 
Jackson, toward evening, attempted to turn our right flank, but was met by Tyler s brigade in 
front, when Colonel Kimball threw several regiments on his right flank, and after a desperate 
fight, which in some instances was hand to hand, the enemy was routed and driven furiously 
from the field. 

The Eighth was deployed as skirmishers, both the evening before and on the morning of 
this engagement. Toward evening the right wing was withdrawn from the skirmish line and 
participated in the charge on the enemy s right flank. The killed and wounded of the Eighth 
amounted to over one-fourth the number engaged. The companies engaged were C, E, D, and 
H. The loss in the other companies was two killed and eight wounded. 

During the months of March and April the regiment followed the enemy up the Valley, 
skirmishing with him at Woodstock, Mount Jackson, Edinburgh, and New Market. At the 
latter place Colonel Kimball received his commission as Brigadier-General, and became com 
mander of the brigade in which the Eighth was. On the 12th of May the regiment started for 
Fredericksburg to join McDowell s corps, where it arrived on the 22d, and on the 23d was 
reviewed by President Lincoln. On the 25th, Jackson having driven General Banks out of the 
Valley, the division was ordered back to the Valley, and on the 30th reached and recaptured 
Front Royal. The Eighth skirmished from Rectortown, a distance of eighteen miles. Among 
the prisoners captured was the famous Belle Boyd. 

From Front Royal, Shield s division marched up the South Branch of the Shenandoah, 
while Fremont s artillery could be heard as he pushed Jackson rapidly up the North Branch. 

Shield s division was now broken up, and Kimball s and Terry s brigades ordered to the 
Peninsula, arriving at Harrison s Landing on the 1st of July. On the 3d and 4th of July the 
Eighth was thrown out toward the Chickahominy swamps, having on each day a brisk skirmish, 
losing seven severely wounded. 

The army remained at Harrison s until the 16th of August, during which time it participated - 
in a reconnoissance to Malvern Hill, and was while here united to the Second Corps, then 
commanded by Sumner. The Eighth was with Kimball s brigade, in French s division. With 
this corps it continued to act during the remainder of its service. 

When the army retreated the Second Corps acted as rear guard until the army crossed the 
Chickahominy, and from thence marched by Yorktown to Newport News, when it was embarked 
in transports and taken to Alexandria, arriving on the 28th. On the 30th the roar of battle 
between Lee and Pope could be distinctly heard, and at noon the corps commenced a rapid 
march to the front, but only arrived at Centerville in time to witness the massing, at that place, 
of Pope s army. The next day the march toward Chain Bridge commenced, the Second Corps 
being on the left flank. The Eighth in this march was only once under fire, and that at Ger- 
mantown, a few miles north of Fairfax C. H. 

The Potomac was crossed at Chain Bridge, and the march through Maryland commenced, 
which ended in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam. The corps came up as a support 
ing line at South Mountain, but was not actively engaged, but crossed the mountain and skir 
mished with the enemy at Boonsboro and Reedyville. Near this place the whole army w;is 
massed by the morning of the 16th of September, and a furious artillery duel commenced. One 
of the first of the enemy s shots killed W. W. Farmer, a color-sergeant of the P^ighth. This 
cannonade lasted all day. The next day the battle of Antietam was fought. The Second Corps 
crossed the river and occupied the center of the line. Hooker had been engaged on the right for 
Beveral hours, when French s and Sedgwick s divisions advanced Sedgwick on the right and 
met the enemy in strong position on a ridge. In the advance, Kimball s brigade formed the 
third line, Morris and Max Weber s preceding. They struck the Rebel line and were driven 



68 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

back ; when Kimball advanced at a double-quick, carrying the line handsomely, and holding it 
for four hours, and until firing ceased in front. During this time Sedgwick was driven back 
on the right, which made it necessary for the Fourteenth Indiana and Eighth Ohio to change 
front ; which was done most gallantly, and saved the brigade from rout. General Sumner pro 
nounced KimbalFs the " Gibraltar Brigade." 

The regiment moved with its corps to Bolivar Heights, from whence, on the 1st of October, 
it participated in a reconnoissance to Leesburg. From this place the regiment moved with the 
army to Falmouth, participating in skirmishes at Hulltown, Snicker s Gap, United States 
Ford, etc. 

In the terrible battle of Fredericksburg, on the 13th of December, the Eighth formed the 
right wing of the forlorn hope ; the Fourth Ohio and First Delaware forming the left. The 
Eighth passed up Hanover street by the left flank, in order to deploy to form line with the other 
regiments which marched out lower down. Before the regiment cleared the street the Eebel 
fire struck the head of the column, killing and wounding twenty-eight ; the other regiments also 
lost heavily, but the line was formed, and the enemy s outposts driven in to the foot of the hill 
on which were his main works. Here the line was to halt, seeking cover, for the main line to 
advance, but no line could reach it ; column after column, for hours, was broken and driven 
back by the terrible shower of missiles passing over this line, which at dusk was withdrawn. 
In this battle the killed and wounded numbered thirty-seven. 

The army remained in camp until the 28th of April, 1863, when it crossed the river and 
fought the battle of Chancellors ville. In this battle the regiment was almost constantly under 
fire for four days, but its loss was only two killed and eleven wounded. The brigade was at 
this time and subsequently "commanded by General Carroll. 

No further active service was had until the Gettysburg campaign. In that battle the regi 
ment bore a conspicuous part. On the afternoon of the 2d of July it was thrown forward 
beyond the Emmetsburg road, to take and hold a knoll, from which the Kebel sharpshooters 
were annoying our lines. This position it captured by a charge at the double-quick, and held 
until the final close of the battle, a period of twenty-six hours. It was three times attacked by 
superior numbers, and once by three regiments, which were gallantly repelled, broken, and 
nearly all, with three stands of colors, captured. A change of front was then effected, and the 
fire of the regiment poured into the flank of the immense mass of troops marching upon Gen 
eral Hay s division. The regiment lost one hundred and two, killed and wounded. 

During the pursuit of Lee across the Potomac, the regiment was engaged in several skir 
mishes, and after the enemy s escape, marched with the army to the Rapidan. 

On the 15th of August the regiment was sent to New York City to help quell the riots 
then threatening that city. The trip was made by water, and this, with the sojourn in Brook 
lyn, forms a pleasant episode in the history of the soldiers of the Eighth. 

Returning again to the field, it joined the army at Culpepper, and proceeded to Robinson 
River, looking the enemy in the face again. On the 10th of October, Lee having turned our 
right, a rapid march was made back to Centerville. On the route the regiment was engaged in 
the battles of Auburn and Bristow, October 14th, having two men wounded. 

On the 27th, 28th, and 29th of November the regiment participated in the battles of Robin 
son s Cross Roads, Locust Grove, and Mine Run, acting mainly as skirmishers, in which several 
men were killed and wounded. 

On February 6, 1864, crossed the Rapidan and fought the battle of Morton s Ford. In this 
battle several officers and men were wounded. 

On the evening of the 3d of May the vast army was in motion, and the great campaign 
opened. The Second Corps crossed the Rapidan at Germania Ford, and moved rapidly through 
the Wilderness by the old Chancellorsville battle-field to " Todd s tavern," occupying the 
extreme left of the line. On the evening of the 5th the right of the line was furiously engaged, 
and the Second Corps moved to its support. At a point known as the " cross roads," the Four- 



EIGHTH OHIO INFANTRY. 69 

teenth Indiana, Eighth Ohio, and Seventh Virginia, under the command of Colonel Coons, 
(Fourteenth Indiana), retook a section of a battery which had been lost by the Sixth Corps. 

During the entire day of the 6th the regiment was engaged. In the morning, in a terrible 
fight in the dense undergrowth, a heavy loss was sustained. On the 7th, 8th, and 9th continued 
skirmishing was going on as the enemy was closely followed to Spottsylvania C. H. On the 
10th a very strong work of the Rebels was charged, in which another severe loss was sustained, 
and Sergeant Conlan, who had gallantly carried the regimental colors in over thirty engage 
ments, was wounded. On the morning of the 12th, in the splendid charge of Hancock on the 
enemy s right, the regiment again lost heavily. The regiment was engaged throughout the day, 
and for the next two days was almost constantly under fire, until the movement to Guiney. The 
loss in these several engagements was over sixty in killed and wounded. 

In the numerous skirmishes from Spottsylvania to Petersburg, and in the battles of North 
Anna, Cold Harbor, and in front of Petersburg, the regiment was engaged. At North Anna 
a difficult duty of taking and holding a ford- was assigned the regiment and gallantly executed. 

On the 25th of June, its term of service having expired, the regiment was relieved from 
duty, being then in the trenches before Petersburg with only seventy-two officers and men for 
duty, and returned to Ohio to be mustered out of service. 

On the route home it was frequently greeted with tokens of respect ; especially at Zanes- 
ville, where a collation was provided; and at Cleveland, where it arrived on the morning of the 
3d of July, and was cordially received by the mayor and military committee. 

The regiment was formally mustered out on the 13th of July, 1864, by Captain Douglass. 



70 



OHIO IN THE WAE. 



9th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 
Surgeon 
Ass t Surgeon. 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


ROBERT L. McCOOK 
CHARLES SONDERSHOFF 


April 

May 
April 

;; 


21, ISfil 
21 " 

| :: 

1 " 

23, 
23, 

23, * 

I 

23, * 
23, 
23, 

a 

a : 

23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 


April 

May 
April 


28, 1861 

a :: 

I: " 

23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 




CHARLFS E BOYLE 


RUDOLPH WIRTH 
Charles Joseph 




Frederick Schroeuer 
Lewis C. Frintz 


Do. ... 
Do 


Gustavus Kaemmerling 


Do 
Do 


F. Congelin 


Do 

1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 






Gebhart King 








B Benz 










Augustus Willich.. .. 


Ferdinand Mueller 




Joseph Haider 










Jacob Gluckowski 
Theodore Hafner 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 


ROBERT L. McCOOK 
GUST S K^MMERLIN J. 
CHARLES SONDERSHOFF 
GUSTAVUS KJEMMERLING.... 
CHARLES JOSEPH 


May 28, 1861 
6, 1862 
" 28, 1861 
March 8, 1862 
Aug. 6, " 
Jan. 1, 1864 
May 28, 1861 

NO V. 2 5; " 

March 8, 1862 
Aug. 6, " 
Jan. 1, 1864 
May 28, 1861 
April 29, 1863 
Oct. 23, 1861 
Aug. 21, " 
July 24, 1863 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Feb. 18, 1862 
May 28, I;s61 
28, " 
" 28, " 
" 28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
" 28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
" 28, " 
28, " 
June 2ft, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 
Nov. 1. 1861 


7 

May 

April 
Nov. 
Feb. 


28, 1861 
20, 1^62 
28, 1S61 
10, 1862 
30, " 
6, 1864 


Promoted to Brigadier-General by President. 
Discharged ; revoked by President. 
Resigned March 8, 1862. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Resigned May 10, 1863. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Declined. 
Appointed Colonel 32d Indiana Regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Resigned April 29, 1863. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Died March 29, 1863. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Transferred to Captaincy of company 0. 
Resigned June 9, 1863. 
Promoted to Major. 
Declined promotion. 
Resigned October 22, 1861. 
Promoted to Jlajor. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to Major. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Died October 28, 1863. 
Resigned June 13, 1861, W. Dept. 
Killed in action, September 26, 1863. 
Promoted to Major. 
Killed in action, September 20, 1863. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Revoked. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 


Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 


FREDERICK SCHRCEDER 
FRANK LINK ... . 


Do. . 


AUGUSTUS WILLICH 
GUSTAVUS K^EMMERLING.... 
CHARLES JOSEPH 


Do . 


Feb. 
June 
Nov. 
Feb. 
May 

Oct. 
Aug. 
July 
Aug. 
Feb. 
May 

Sept. 
Jan. 
Feb. 


18, 1*62 
24, " 
30, " 
6, 1864 
2s, 1861 
19, 1863 
23, 1861 
21, " 
24, 1863 
24, 1861 
19, 1*62 
28, 1861 
28, 
28, 
2, 
28, 
28, 4 
28, 
28, " 
28, 
28, 
28, 

a : 

1; : 

9, 1862 
18, " 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 


FREDERICK SCHR<EDER 
BARTHOLOMEW BENZ 
CHARLES E. BOYLE 
CONRAD S<ELLHEIM 


JAM ES DAVKNPORT 


A M BEKRS 




Do 
Captain 

1)0 

Do 
Do 
Do. 


JOSEPH A. FUCHSIIUBER 
Charles Joseph 
VVm . Margedant 
Henry Broderson 
Frederick Schrceder 
Lewis C. Frintz .. . 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. , 


Gustavus Kifi miner ling 
F. Lammers 
F. Congelin 
John Jansen 
George Sommers 
Ferdinand Mueller 
Bartholomew Benz 
Gustav Richter 
Jacob Gluckowski 
B EtHilf Thn?uson 


Geo II Harries. . 


Do 


Louis HeuHer 



NINTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



71 



BANK. 


NAMK. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 
Do 
Do 


Wm.Stwngel 
Krnest Rubenow 
Clias. B. Gentsch 


Sept. 6, 1861 
March 8, " 
May 30, " 
.Sept. 28, " 
Aug. 28, " 
Feb. 1, 1864 
Jan. 1, " 
1, " 
March 21, " 
May 2*, 18f>l 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
2*, " 
28, " 
" 28, " 
28, " 
" 28, " 
" 28, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 
27, " 
Feb. 5, " 


Feb. 
J u no 
Nov. 

April 
Feb. 

March 
May 

Jan. 
Feb. 


18, 1862 
24, " 
30, " 
30, " 
22, 186., 
6, 18tV4 
6, " 
6, " 
21, " 
28, 1861 
28, " 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
9, 1862 
27, " 
5, " 


Cashiered August 28, 1862. 
Canceled. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Declined: 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 


Do 
Do 
Do 




Maurice Pohlman 
\darn Shoemaker 


Do 


Herman Luetkenhaus 
George II. Harries 


Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do, 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 




Promoted to Captain. 
Declined promotion. 
Adjutant promoted. 
Resigned July 13, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned October 31, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain.* 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned July 5, 1862. 
Resigned July 5, 18^2. 
Resigned September 23, 1861. 
Resigned July 18. 1862. 
Died of wounds October 9, 1863. 
Declined commission. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned February 7, 1862. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Killed in action September 22, 1863. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Dismissed January 15, 1863. 
Mustered out June 7, 1.864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1S64. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant February 7, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant February. 
Declined commission. 
Resigned. 
Declined commission. 
Declined commission ; resigned July 5, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted ; declined commission. 
Resigned July :>, 18C.2. 
Resigned July 5, 1862, 
Resigned May TO, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
( Colonel refused to recognize : ordered them 
I from regiment. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed in action September 19, 1363. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned Mav 8, 1863. 
Resigned November 16, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 
Dismissed March 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 7, 1864. 








Gustavus F. Nepper 
15 Benz 








Lucas Schwenk 
Herman Luetkenhaus 
William Ht-nhig . 


Theodore Hafner 






Theodore I jammers 
Frederick Bertsch 


Adam Shoemaker 
Joseph GraiH" 


Nov. 1, 1801 
Feb. 18 1862 


, t 


18, " 
18, * 


Nicholas Willig 


Sept. 29, 1861 
Fob. 7, 1862 
March 8, " 
July 24, " 
Sept. 1, " 
July 21, || 

Feb. ij 1864 
1, " 
Aug. 28, 1862 
Feb. 1, 1864 


June 

Nov. 

Feb. 

April 

Feb. 


18, 
24, 
24, 
30, 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
6, 1864 
6, * 
22, 1863 
6, 1864 


Martin Bruner 


Charles B. Gentsch 
Charles Dolezich 


Richard Schneider 






Herman Grosskordt 
Henry Spseth 


Frederick Mueller 


May 28. 1861 
28, " 
2s, " 
| 28, | 

28^ " 
" 2S, " 
" 28, " 
28, " 

28, " 
" 28, " 
" 28, " 
" 2S " 
28, " 
28, || 

Jan. 9, 1862 


May 

Jan. 


21, 1861 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
9, 1862 
9, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
22, " 
22, " 
29, " 




Charles Loewenstein 
Martin Bruner 


Henry Hunger 


Adolphus Kuchne 
Jacob Gluckowski 
Theodore Hafner 
Charles B. Gentsch 
Frederick Bertsch 


John Baumgaertner 


Theodore Lammers 
Max Polacheck 1 




Sept. 6, 1861 
29, " 
29, " 
July 2 >, 1862 
24, " 
Sept. 1, " 
28 " 
July 24, " 
24, " 
March 1, " 
Sept. 1, " 
Nov. 16, " 
Aug. 28, " 
May 8, 1863 


Feb. 

Nov. 

April 
May 




Herman Grosskordt 


Herman Pocnitz 


Louis Grove 
Raymond Herman 
Frederick Stemmer 
Alex Heilbrunn 


Frederick Oberkline 


Henry Blandowski 


Henrv Spa-th 


Tlieodore Racek 




George Hartung 





72 OHIO IN THE WAR, 



NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



WHEN the news of the fall of Sumter reached Cincinnati, the Germans immediately 
held a meeting at Turner Hall, for the purpose of raising a German regiment. The 
assembly was addressed by Judge J. B. Stallo, Colonel A. Moor, Colonel Robert L. 
McCook and others. Two hundred men were soon enrolled, and three days later there were 
fifteen hundred ready to be mustered into the service ; but, as the companies were not allowed 
to exceed ninety-eight men, many were rejected and compelled, reluctantly, to return to 
their homes. 

On the 22d of April, 1861, the regiment was mustered into the thjee months service, by 
Captain Gordon Granger, United States Army, at Camp Harrison, near Cincinnati, and May 
18th it marched to Camp Dennison. Here the regiment was reorganized and mustered into 
the service for three years, and was the first three years organization from the State of Ohio. 
In consideration of this the ladies of Columbus presented a very fine bass-drum to the regi 
ment. It was mustered in with one thousand and thirty-five officers and men, exclusive of the 
band, which consisted of twenty-four musicians. 

On the 16th of June the Ninth left the State, and on the 20th entered Western Virginia, 
with the first of General McClellan s re-enforcements for Morris s command. The regiment 
marched from Webster to Philippi, a distance of fifteen miles, in three hours, and thence 
moved to Buckhannon, and met the enemy s outposts at Middle Fork Bridge. They were soon 
routed, and the troops advanced to Rich Mountain, where the Ninth was engaged, and sustained 
its first loss one killed and two wounded. The advance continued across Rich Mountain into 
Tygart s Valley, through Beverly and Huttonsville to Cheat Mountain. From here the regi 
ment was ordered back to Beverly, and thence via Webster and Oakland across the Allegha- 
nies to New Creek, on the Potomac, arriving July 27th. 

Here the regiment performed very heavy guard duty, one company being detached as an 
outpost at Cumberland, Maryland, and another at an important railroad bridge across the Poto 
mac, three miles beyond New Creek. About this time the Ninth was brigaded with the Fourth 
and Eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Howe s battery of the Fourth United States artillery. 
On the 22d of August five companies of the Ninth were sent back to Huttonsville and Elkwater, 
where they had hardly arrived when with other troops they were ordered to Frenchtown. The 
march was continued to Bulltown, where they joined the other half of the regiment, which 
had left New Creek on the 27th of August, and reached Bulltown, via Clarksburg and Weston, 
on September 2d. Upon the concentration of the forces at Sutton, the regiment moved to that 
point, and was assigned to the Second Brigade, consisting of the Ninth, Twenty-Eighth, and 
Forty-Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and a Company of Chicago Dragoons. On the 7th of 
September the army broke camp, and on the morning of the 10th drove the Rebel cavalry 
out of the village of Summerville, and at three o clock P. M., arrived in front of the fortifica 
tions near Carnifex Ferry. In the engagement which ensued, the Ninth lost two killed and 
eight wounded. The army followed the retreating Rebels and occupied Big Sewell Mountain ; 



NINTH OHIO INFANTKY. 73 

but, on account of the difficulty in transporting supplies, the troops fell back to a point about 
six miles east of Gauley Bridge, and the Second Brigade encamped on the right bank of New 
River, at Camp Anderson. During the month of October there were frequent skirmishes with 
the Rebels, who had their sharpshooters and masked battery posted among the rocky hills on 
the opposite side of the ri\er, and in these little engagements the Ninth lost a few killed and 
wounded. 

The Ninth left Camp Anderson November 24th, and proceeded to Louisville, Kentucky, 
arriving December 2d. It camped at Jeffersonville, Indiana, for a few days, and then moved to 
Lebanon, Kentucky, where the Ninth, together with the Thirty-Fifth Ohio Infantry and Second 
Minnesota, formed the Third Brigade, First Division, Army of the Ohio. On the 1st of Jan 
uary, 1862, the division moved toward Columbia, and from there advanced to Camp Hamilton, 
twelve miles from Zollicoffer s intrenchments, arriving January 17th. The regiment participa 
ted in the battle of Mill Springs, and made a decisive charge, completely routing the Kebels. 
Ever after the battle of Mill Springs the Ninth Ohio and the Second Minnesota were attached 
to each other by the strongest friendship. Perfect harmony of feeling existed between 
them, and each was always watchful for the honor of the other. On the 10th of February the 
division marched via Crab Orchard, Danville, Lebanon, and Bardstown, to Louisville. The 
patriotic ladies of Louisville presented to the Ninth Ohio, Second Minnesota, Tenth Indiana, 
and Fourth Kentucky, each a beautiful National flag, as a reward for their gallantry at Mill 
Springs. Immediately after the presentation, the division embarked on steamers, and was con 
veyed down the Ohio and up the Cumberland to Nashville, Tennessee ; arriving March 2d. 

About the middle of March the Army of the Ohio left Nashville for Pittsburg Landing, 
but as Thomas s division was held in reserve, the Ninth did not arrive on the battle-field until 
the 8th of April. In the advance on Corinth the regiment performed its full share of duty in 
the trendies, and on the picket line. After the evacuation of Corinth, it joined the pursuit of 
the Kebels, but soon returned and camped near the town. On the 22d of June the Ninth 
marched via luka to Tuscumbia, Alabama, and while in camp there received an elegant regi 
mental flag, presented by the Council of Cincinnati in the name of the city. On the 27th of 
July the camp was broken up, and the command moved toward Decherd, Tennessee. It was 
on this march that General Kobert L. McCook, commanding Third Brigade, First Division, was 
ambuscaded and shot by a party of guerrillas ; and the command of the Third Brigade devolved 
upon Brigadier-General James B. Steedman. 

The division concentrated at Decherd, and after enjoying a few days rest joined the general 
movement of the Army of the Ohio northward. After enduring many hardships, occasioned by 
forced marches, excessive heat, and scarcity of water, the army reached Louisville, September 
27th. On the 3d of October a forward movement commenced, and on the 8th, Steed man s 
brigade rested nearly all day within hearing of the guns at Perryville. Late in the evening 
it was ordered to the field, and for about an hour was exposed to a heavy fire from the Kebel 
batteries ; but, as they were badly managed and did not have correct range, the loss was small. 
The Ninth followed the retreating Rebels as far as Crab Orchard, and from there marched via 
Lancaster, Danville, and Lebanon, to Bowling Green. 

Steedman s brigade now consisted of the Ninth and Thirty-Fifth Ohio, the Second Minnesota, 
the Eighty-Seventh Indiana, and the Eleventh Regulars, and Battery I, Fourth United States 
Artillery. It was posted at South Tunnel, and assigned the duty of cleaning out the tunnel, in 
order to open railroad communication with Nashville. The men worked hard and continually, 
day and night, from the 8th to the 26th of November, when the tunnel was opened and trains 
were able to run through. The brigade was next ordered to Pilot Knob, to guard the railroad 
and the fords of the Cumberland, opposite, and below Saundersville. It moved to Gallatin, Ten 
nessee, December 26th, and during the battle of Murfreesboro guarded the fords of the Cum 
berland, that connected with the Lebanon Pike. After scouting the country up the Cumberland 
as far as Hartsville, the brigade marched to Nashville, January 14th, 1863, and was engaged in 



74 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

ecouting and reconnoitering from the Murfreesboro Pike to Franklin, and as far south as 
Chaplin Hills, until March 6th, when tents were pitched at Triune. 

Here the Ninth was engaged in erecting strong works, and was frequently instructed in 
brigade and division drill. It occasionally joined scouting and foraging expeditions, and its 
efficiency was greatly increased by a supply of Springfield rifled muskets. This improvement 
was mainly due to the efforts of Governor Tod and Quartermaster-General Wright, of Ohio. 
Another cause of gratification to the boys of the Ninth, was the arrival in camp of a newly re 
cruited regimental band. Comfortable huts were erected for their accommodation as soon as it 
was known they were coming, and their arrival was greeted with hearty shouts of welcome. 

On the 24th of June the troops again advanced. The weather had been very favorable 
and the roads were in excellent condition ; but on the morning of the 24th a heavy rain set in, 
and continued for seventeen consecutive days. The Ninth participated in the movement on 
Hoover s Gap and Fairfield, and on the evening of the 29th led a heavy reconnoitering party 
within six miles of Tullahoma. Upon the evacuation of Tullahoma the army followed the 
Rebels over continuous mountain ranges to the banks of the Tennessee. The regiment in the 
Third Division (General Brannon s,) of the Fourteenth Corps (General Thomas s,) crossed the 
river at Battle Creek on rafts; marched over Sand and Eaccoon Mountains through Lookout 
Valley by way of Trenton Gap, over Lookout Mountain and down to McLemon s Cove, arriv 
ing September 10th. Two days later the division moved to the support of two advanced divis 
ions, toward Dry Gap. On the 17th, the division marched with the bulk of the Fourteenth 
Corps, down the Chickamauga toward Gordon s Mills, and thence toward Rossville. As rapidly 
as possible, and without rest or interruption, the troops pushed on during the whole night pre 
ceding the battle. The fences on both sides of the road were on fire, and the blinding smoke 
greatly increased the hardships of that night s march. The leading brigade of the division be 
came engaged about daylight, and the Third Brigade soon after. It was commanded by Colonel 
Van Derveer, who succeeded General Steedman. 

At the beginning of the action the regiment was in charge of an ammunition train in the 
rear, and did not come up until the battle was raging. Passing the place where the Regular 
Brigade of Baird s division lost its guns, the Ninth pressed forward and boldly charged for the 
captured guns. They were posted nearly a quarter of a mile off, and were well protected by the 
Rebel fire, and by a cross-fire of our own guns ; but without faltering, the regiment dashed on 
drove the Rebels back and recaptured the battery. It did not stop to rest here, but joined the 
brigade in time to assist in repelling Longstreet s forces. On the second day of the battle the 
regiment participated in the famous bayonet charge of Van Derveer s brigade ; and in the after 
noon, while holding the hill on which the right of General Thomas s corps rested, it once more 
drove the Rebels back at the point of the bayonet. When nightfall closed the struggle, the 
supply of ammunition was completely exhausted, and the men had been compelled to gather 
cartridges from the boxes of the dead and wounded. The loss of the Ninth in the two days 
battle was equal to one-third the loss of the entire brigade. The regiment went into action 
about five hundred strong, and lost in killed, wounded, and missing, eleven officers and two 
hundred and thirty-seven enlisted men. 

The army occupied Chattanooga, and for some time the Ninth, in common with other 
regiments, suffered from want of sufficient rations. In the reorganization of the army under 
Thomas, Van Derveer s brigade was assigned to General Baird s command, and denominated 
Second Brigade, Third Division, Army of the Cumberland. 

In the assault on Mission Ridge, Baird s division was on the left, near to Tunnel Hill. 
The open ground between the timber and the foot of the ridge was crossed by the troops on the 
double-quick, under a heavy fire of musketry and artillery, and the ascent began. After won 
derful exertions the summit was reached, and the Rebels routed. As the National troops were 
resting after their labors, the Rebel forces on Tunnel Hill moved against a battery of five guns, 
which Van Derveer s brigade had captured. The Ninth Ohio and One Hundred and First In- 



NINTH OHIO INFANTRY. 75 

diana immediately formed, and though greatly outnumbered by the .Rebels, repulsed them three 
times, when they abandoned the attack. In this engagement the regiment lost two killed and 
twelve wounded. 

On the 30th of December the Ninth started in charge of a battery and provision train for 
Calhoun, and returned to Chattanooga, January 8th, 1864. It moved to Kinggold, Georgia, and 
participated in a heavy skirmish at Crow s Valley, February 25th. During the months of 
March and April the Ninth remained encamped at Ringgold, and on the 5th of May joined 
the grand forward movement under General Sherman. It participated in the battle of Eesaca, 
May 15th, and on the 20th entered on its last march against the enemy, moving from Kingston 
to the Etowah Elver. 

As the regiment s term of service expired May 27th, 1864, it was ordered to Ohio for mus 
ter out. Up to the last moment it stood within range of the enemy s guns, and from the very 
outer picket line it was relieved by General Thomas, in person, and started for Cincinnati. All 
along the road stood their fellow-soldiers who cheered most heartily as the regiment moved 
away ; and not any less hearty were the farewells returned by the boys of the Ninth Ohio. The 
regiment received an enthusiastic reception at Cincinnati, and was mustered out of the service 
at Camp Dennison on the 7th of June, 1864. 



76 



OHIO IN THE WAE. 



10th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF BANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 




WM. H. LYTLE 


May 
April 

May 
April 


6, 1861 
6, " 
6, || 

2, " 
19, " 
22, " 

J!; 

18, " 
18, 
25, 
27, 
1, 
12, 
19, 
22, 
19, 


May 

April 

May 

April 


6, 1861 

6, " 
6, 
2, 
2, 
19, 
22, 
19; 

I; 

2 i " 
12) " 

19, " 
22, " 
19, " 
24, 
1, 
18, 
25, 
28, 
1, 
12, 
19, 
22, 
19, 
24, 
18, 

$ : 

28, 
1, 
12, 








Major 


JOSEPH W. BURKE 

C. S. MUSCROFT 


Ass t Surgeon 




John O Dowd 


Do 


Emil Seip 


Do 


Oliver C. Pier 
Robert M. Moore w 


Do 


Do .. .. 


Stephen J. McGroarty 


So 


o 


James P. Sedam 
Thomas G. Tiernan 
Win. M. Ward 


Do 


Do 


DO! :.:::::::: 

1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do! 
2d Lieutenant 

Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Henry Robinson 


George SrhlalVmaker 
John E. Hudson 
Philip C. Marmion 
James M. Fitzgerald 


May 

April 

May 
April 


1, " 
IS, " 
25, " 
2$, " 
1, " 
12, 
19, 
22, 
19, 
24, 
18 


May 
April 

May 
April 

May 
April 


Conrad Frederick 


Isaac J. Carter 
Thomas McMullen 
Chas C Cramsey 


Samuel S. G. Peterson 
John Cranlev 


Rudolphus Liibanas 
James F. Hickey 
John S. Mulroy 
John C.. Sullivan 


Sebastian Eustachi 
Wm. H Steele 


May 

\pril 


18, " 
25, " 
28, " 
1, " 
12, " 


Joseph Conley 
Nicholas Lacy 
John Bailey 







ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



HANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Major 


WM. H. LYTLE 
JOSEPH W. BURKE 
HERMAN J. KORFF 
JOSEPH W. BUIIKE 
ROBERT M. MOORE 
WM. W. WARD 
JOSEPH W. BURKE 


June 4, 1861 
Jan. 20, 1863 
June 4, 1861 
Jan. 9, 1862 
20, 18(13 
March 15, " 
June 4, 1861 
Jan. 9, 1862 
" 20, 1863 
June 9, " 


June 
Feb. 
June 
Jan. 
Feb. 
March 
June 
Jan. 

June 


4, 18fil 

16, 1863 
4, 1861 
9, 1862 
16, 1863 
24, " 
4, 1861 
9. 1S62 
26, 1863 
23, " 


Appointed Brig. Gen. by President Nov. 29, 62. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Discharged December 12, 1861 ; order revoked. 
Promoted to Colonel January 20, 1862. 
Resigned March 15, 1863. 
Mustered out June 17, 18B4. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Resigned June 9, 1863. 
Appointed Surgeon Seventy-Second Regiment. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Resigned May 8, 1863. 
Unsigned May 23, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Resigned July 13, 1862. 
Resigned December 12, 1861. 
.Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major. 
Appointed Colonel Fiftieth 0. V. I. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Resigned July, 1861. 
Discharged December 12, 1861. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned November 8, 1861. 
Resigned October 19, 1862. 
Resigned March 15, 1863. 
Died November 3, 1862. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out, June 17, 1864. 
Deceased November 17, 1863. 
Resigned May 12, 1863. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
General Rosecrans s staff. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 


Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Captain 

Do . . . . . . . . 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


ROBERT M. MOORE 
JOHN E. HUDSON 
HOMER C. SHAW 


C. S. MUSCROFT 


JOHN B. RICE 
HOMER C. SHAW 


June 6, 1861 
Nov. 2-5, " 
Sept. 1, 1862 
May 9, 1863 
June 3, 1861 
3, " 
3, " 
" 3, 
" 3, 
" 3, 
" 3, 
11 3, 
3, 
" 3, 
" 3, 
Dec. 21, 
" 21, 
" 21, 
Jan. 9, 1862 
28, " 
Dec. 12, 1861 
July 13, 1862 
Oct. 19, " 
Nov. 3, " 
Jan. 20,1863 
March 15, " 
15, " 


Nov. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
June 

Dec. 

Jan. 

June 
Oct. 
Dec. 

March 
May 


9, 1861 

6, 1862 
29, 1863 
3, 1861 

!! 

21! 

21, " 
21, " 

9, 1862 

24, " 
20, " 
27, || 

11, 1863 

.;; 


F. E. POWERS 
JOSEPH H. V ANDAMAN 
T. 0. HIGGINS 
John O Dowd 


Emil Seip 


John E. Hudson 


Robert M. Moore 
Stephen McGroarty 




Thomas G Tiernan 
Wm. M. Ward 


Wm. H. Steele 


Chas. F. Nickel 
Philip C. Marmion 
John Fanning 
James T. Hickey 
lames M. Fitzgerald 


Thomis 1 Kfllev 




Win. Margadant 
Daniel O Connor 
Rudolph Seebauin 



TENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



77 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 
Do 


Luke H. Murdock 

i has. (J. Cramscy 


Mav 12, 1863 
N..v. 17, " 


May 22, 1863 
Jan. Id, 1861 


Mastered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 


.John Panning 
Geo. fcchsefonbaker 


Juno 3. 1861 


June 3, 1861 
3 " 


Promoted to Captain. 


Do. 
Do. 


James F. llickev 
Philip C. Mar 111 ion 


" 3* " 

" 3 " 


3, " 

3 " 


Pro noted to Captain. 
Pro noted to Capt iin 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


James M. Fitzgerald 
Conrad Frederick 
Win. 11. Steel- 


3 , 


3", " 
3, " 


Pro noted to Captain. 
Res gned. 
Promoted to Captain December 12, 1861 


Do. 


( has. C. Cramscy 


14 .5 11 


3 " 




Do 


John B-ntlev 


it > ti 


t 3 11 




Do. 


John Stiles 


Dec. Z\\ " 


Dec. 21, " 


Kt sitfncd August *I2, 1*862. 


Do. 
Do 


Henry I). Page 
John S Mulruy 


21, " 
.Jan 9 1862 


21, " 
Jan 186 7 


Resigned February <i, 1.S62. 


Do 


lost ! h Hol in 








Do 


John Sullivan 


" i) " 


11 ^ 11 




Do 










Do 




" 28 " 


11 2x " 




Do 


Nicholas Lacv 


Feb 28 


Feb 28 




Do 


Rudolph Seebaiim 


" 28 


ii 2s * 




Do. 
Do 


George C. Mueller 
Thomas J Kelley . 


Jan. 12, 
Dec 1 


March 20, ". 


Discharged May 2. Sec. War. 


Do 


Nicholas Knox 




ii 24 " 


!* i 1 A t l > 


Do 


Win Lambert 


May 2 


" 24 " 




Do. 
Do 


Daniel O Connor 
Luke II Murdock 


" 2, 


Dec. 27, " 

" 27 " 


Promoted to Captain. 


Do 


Wm Ostendorff 


July 13 


Jan 26, 1863 




Do. 


Alfred Pirtle 


Aug. 12, 


Dec, 27, 1862 


Honorably discharged April 7, 1864. 


Do. 
Do. 


Luke Murrin 
Thomas Patterson 


Oct. 8, || 


" 27, " 
27, " 


Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 


Do. 


Timothy McNeft 




Jan Hi 1864 


Mustered out June 17, 1864. 


Do. 
Do. 


Dominick J. Burke 
Joseph Donahoe 


Jan. 20, 1863 
\pril 13 " 


March 10, 1863 
31 ay 22 " 


Mustered out June 17 , 1864. 
Mustered out Juno 17 1864 


Do. 


Daniel Toohey 




11 22 " 


Mustered out June 17 1864. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 


Granville Me Sheeney 
Daniel O Neil 
( / has. Weber 
John Cranley 


May lj " 
M irch 15, " 
May 12. " 
Ji ne 3, 1861 


22, " 
22, " 
22, " 
June 3, 1861 


Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Resigned November 20, 1861. 


Do. 




; |> ;: 


i 3 ii 




Do 




3 " 


i 3 " 




Do. 
Do 


John Sullivan 


3, " 
3 " 


3, " 
i 3 " 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do 






i 3 " 


\ 1 i t . 1 


Do 




i Q 1 It 


3 " 




Do 




( .4, l( 


i ^ ii 




Do 


John Stiles 


3 " 


i 3 " 


^ < y , ao. 


Do. 


Thomas B n rues 




Aug. 12, " 




Do. 


Rudolph Seebaum 


4 " 






Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


George C. Mueller 
Wm.Lambert 
Nicholas Knox 
Thomas J. Kelley 


Aug. 7, " 
Dec. 21, " 
" 21, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 


22* " 
Dec. 21, " 
21, " 
Jan. 14, 1862 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
3 iomoted to 1st Lieutenant Mav 2, 1863. 
rom. 1st Lieut. June 4 62, res g d Aug. 12, 62. 
romoted to 1st Lieut* iant December 12, 1861. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 


Luke H. Murdock 
Bushrod Birch 
Alfred Pirtle 


Feb v " 


14, " 
14,." 

" 28, " 
March 9 " 


romoted to 1st Lieut* iant. 
romoted to 1st Lieut( iant. 
romoted to 1st Lieut* iant. 
romoted to 1st Lieut* lai t Octobers 1862 


Do. 
Do. 


Thomas Patterson 
Kugene R. Eaton.. 


Jan. 12, 
Feb. 28, 


May l , " 
1, " 


romoted to 1st Lieut* tar t. 
romoted to 1st Lieut* lai t. 


Do. 

fe 


William Porter 
Dominick Burke 
Daniel O Neil 


July 9, 
Dec. 1, 


Oct. 7, " 
Jan. 26, 1863 
Oct 7 186 


Killed October 8, 1862, at I erryville. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenai t. 


Do 










Do 


Daniel Toohey 


Jan 4 


ii * it 




Do 


Timothy McNcff 


Aug 12* 


it * ii 




Do. 
Do. 


Granville McSheeney 
( has. Weber 


""" 12^ 
Nov. 3 


" 7 " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 


Win. Harmon 


Jan 20 1863 


March 10 1863 


Mustered nit June 17 1864. 


Do. 


James Toley 


" i " 


May 22 


Mustered >ut June 17 1864. 


Do. 


Win. Thiede 


" 1, " 




Mustered Mit June 17, 1864. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Thomas Douney 
Isaac Sheidler 
Peter Gepner 


K j it 
May 1, " 
March 1"> " 


22, " 
" 22 " 


Mustered nit Juno 17, 1864. 
Mustered >ut June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out June 17 1864. 


Do. 


Nicholas Walter 


April 13 " 


it 22 " 




Do. 




May 12 " 


il 2? 















78 OHIO IN THE WAK. 



TENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



AFTER the fall of Sumter, the city of Cincinnati promptly responded to the call for 
volunteers, by sending several regiments of infantry, of which the Tenth was one, to 
Camp Harrison. It was mustered into the service on the 7th of May, 18G1, by Cap 
tain Gordon Granger, United States Army, and a few days after it marched to Camp Dennison, 
Ohio, a distance of seventeen miles, in three hours and three-quarters. During the short period 
of its instruction at Camp Dennison, the regiment rapidly acquired a knowledge of its military 
duties. In its ranks were many old soldiers, Avho had studied the art of war, and were not un 
familiar with scenes of actual combat. Some had served in European armies, and not a few 
had been through the Mexican war. It was at this time that the regiment was inspected by 
General McClellan, who expressed his admiration of it in very high terms. 

The Tenth was a three-months regiment, and already half of its time had expired ; and as 
it became evident that troops were needed for a longer term of service, the Tenth, almost as a 
whole, volunteered for three years ; and on the 3d of June it was mustered into the service as a 
three-years regiment. Immediately after this, the ladies of Cincinnati presented a magnificent 
etand of colors to the regiment. The presentation took place at Camp Dennison. Judge Storer 
made the presentation speech, to which the lamented Lytle responded in eloquent terms, causing 
shout after shout to burst from the ranks. 

At last marching orders came, and by the 24th of June the regiment had crossed the Ohio, 
and reported to General McClellan at Grafton, West Virginia, where it bivouacked a week, 
when it was ordered to Clarksburg, and thence to Buckhannon, where the army was being con 
centrated. Just as McClellan s columns had taken up the line of march, a courier arrived with 
the intelligence that five companies of the Seventeenth Ohio, stationed at Glenville, about forty 
miles distant, had been surrounded by a large force of Rebels under Wise. The Tenth was 
immediately sent to the assistance of the garrison, and arrived the afternoon of the next day, 
and found that Colonel Tyler, of the Seventh Ohio Infantry, had anticipated orders and rescued 
the besieged companies. Two months marching and countermarching, and scouting in the 
mountains of Virginia, inured the regiment to the hardships of campaigning. 

When General Rosecrans assumed command of the army his first move was to the right of 
his front of operations, on the Gauley and New Rivers, the Tenth leading the advance of the 
army. Information having been received that Floyd was intrenching himself at Carnifex Ferry, 
the column moved to attack him, and, after four days marching, reached the Gauley River. 
Company C deployed as skirmishers, and first struck the enemy, and drove them back on their 
camp, which was carried by the bayonet, and everything in it captured, including a fine drove 
of cattle. The Tenth was ordered to move forward and reconnoiter the enemy s position. The 
regiment advanced through a dense wood ; and, just as it gained the crest of the hill, the Rebels 
opened with shot, shell, and musketry. The regiment fixed bayonets, and advanced to the 
charge by the flank, no other formation being possible. The head of the column reached the 
ditch, when.the whole Rebel line delivered a volley and the advance was checked. Fitzgibbon, 
the cclor-bearer, had his right hand shot off at the wrist, but immediately picked up the colors 
with t\ e left hand, and, while advancing thus, was mortally wounded, exclaiming as he fell: 
" Never mind me, boys. Save the flag!" Each company was sadly shattered as it came over 



TENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 79 

the hill ; and at last, slowly and reluctantly, they fell back. The line was re-formed, and a 
brisk fire kept up, to prevent the enemy from capturing the wounded. The next morning the 
Rebels were in full retreat, having abandoned their camp equipage and a large quantity of am 
munition, stores, and supplies. 

After a short rest at Cross Lanes the regiment was again in motion. Cox had driven Wise 
from the Kanawha Valley to Sewell Mountain, where Floyd followed. To prevent their cap 
ture, Lee retired from Cheat Mountain and came to their assistance. In this part of the cam 
paign the Tenth took an active share. In falling back from Sewell to Gauley, the roads were 
very muddy, and the column was much delayed by the trains. The Tenth was placed in charge 
of the train, and after that there was no more delay. The regiment served with General Rose- 
crans in every skirmish and battle in the campaign of Western Virginia, closing with the pursuit 
of Floyd from Cotton Mountain. On the 2d of November, 1862, the regiment reached Cincin 
nati, on- its way to Kentucky, and received an enthusiastic welcome. The " heroes of Carnifex " 
were everywhere greeted with applause, and the streets through which the column passed were so 
thronged that it was with difficulty it moved to its rendezvous. The column halted and wheeled 
into line on Broadway, its center resting opposite the residence of Colonel Lytle, who, though 
suffering from a wound, had risen from his bed to accompany the regiment in its triumphal 
march through the city. 

The regiment remained a week in Cincinnati, and, upon arriving in Kentucky, was 
brigaded with the Third and Thirteenth Ohio, Fifteenth Kentucky, and Loomis s battery, 
forming the Seventeenth Brigade of Buell s army, and was a part of the Third Division (Mitch- 
el s). The regiment moved through Kentucky and Tennessee to Northern Alabama, sharing in 
all the splendid achievements of General Mitchel. After three months severe service the regi 
ment was designated as the garrison for the city of Huntsville, and Lieutenant-Colonel Burke 
became Provost-Marshal of Middle Tennessee and Northern Alabama. It is a remarkable cir 
cumstance, that during the time the regiment performed the duty of provost guard, not a single 
case of outrage occurred, and the government of the city was more secure than when under 
civil rule, facts held in. grateful remembrance by the citizens of Huntsville. When General 
Mitchel was ordered to Washington, that portion of the regiment on duty was assembled, and 
the General took leave of them in an appropriate address, speaking in the highest terms of the 
efficiency and discipline of the regiment, and expressing the warmest friendship for Colonel 
Lytle and Lieutenant-Colonel Burke. 

The command of the division devolved upon General Rousseau, and under him Lytle s 
brigade commenced the long march to Kentucky after Bragg, and, in common with the whole 
army, endured all the privations incident to the movement. On the 2d of October, 1862, the 
regiment received an accession of sixty recruits, and the day after marched with the division, 
in McCook s corps, to meet Bragg s army. On the 8th of October the corps marched from 
Macksville toward Perry ville, Lytle s brigade in the advance, and the Tenth leading. Upon 
reaching the field the regiment was deployed as skirmishers, and, after advancing some dis 
tance, was withdrawn and placed as a support to Loomis s battery. When Loomis had exhausted 
his ammunition, and retired to replenish, the Tenth moved to the crest of the eminence. This 
position was held till the regiment was exposed on both flanks. It drove the enemy from the 
front by a charge, but in retiring, which it was forced to do, its track was marked by the dead 
of the regiment, Company formation was impossible, and the men crowded toward the colors. 
Being aware of the loss the regiment must sustain if it retired in disorder, Colonel Burke seized 
a bugle and sounded a halt, formed and dressed the lines, deployed the flank companies as skir 
mishers to cover the retreat, and then retired to the new lines, having but two hundred and 
sixty-three men out of five hundred and twenty-eight. 

When General Rosecrans assumed command of the army, in general orders the Tenth was 
announced as head-quarters and provost guard of the Army of the Cumberland. The regiment 
relieved the Fifteenth United States Infantry, and entered upon its new duties, furnishing guards 
for head-quarters, taking charge of prisoners, preventing straggling during engagements, and 



80 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

during the battle of Stone River it protected the line of communication, and for its efficiency 
was specially mentioned in General Eosecrans s report. The three bridges on which the army 
crossed Stewart s Creek were left in charge of Colonel Burke and eight companies, companies A 
and C having accompanied General Rosecrans to the front. In the early part of the engage 
ment the Rebel cavalry captured several trains, but Colonel Burke sent out parties and suc 
ceeded in recapturing every wagon, and in bringing them within reach of his guns. The little 
band intrenched themselves, and calmly awaited the approach of Wheeler, who advanced cau 
tiously toward Stewart s Creek ; and, meeting an obstinate resistance from Colonel Burke s skir 
mishers, he proceeded to Lavergne, where a great part of the large army train was parked. 
During Wheeler s march to Lavergne the little handful of troops at Stewart s Creek were 
deployed as skirmishers, and engaged in arresting crowds of fugitives from the battle-field ; and 
in less than two hours over three thousand men were stopped, re-assured, and returned to their 
regiments. Cannonading was heard in the direction of Lavergne, where Colonel Lines, Mich 
igan Engineers, commanded. Thomas Reilly, a citizen, dashed through the Rebel lines, bear 
ing dispatches to Burke from Innes, asking assistance. Four companies of cavalry and two 
pieces of artillery, which had reported to Colonel Burke, were sent to Innes ; but the officer in 
command, seeing the vast number of Rebels besieging the garrison, refused to charge through 
to its assistance, and the artillery officer returned and reported the facts to Colonel Burke. 
The Rebels had made several furious assaults on Innes s gallant little band, and he again 
appealed for assistance. Colonel Burke abandoned Stewart s Creek, leaving a few men to guard 
the bridges, and with seven small companies marched against the three thousand Rebel cavalry 
surrounding Innes. A mile from Lavergne the Rebel force was struck, coolly rifling the train 
preparatory to burning it. The Rebel troopers did not fire a shot, but rode off to the main 
body bearing the intelligence of the arrival of re-enforcements, and Wheeler quickly withdrew. 
A courier was dispatched to General Rosecrans with the report of Wheeler s retreat, and Gen 
eral Rosecrans replied : 

"Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, Tenth Ohio Infantry: 

" The General commanding has received your dispatch, and is highly gratified with 
your conduct. By command of General Rosecrans. FRANK BOND, Lt. and A. D. C." 

At head-quarters the regiment soon regained its spirit, and increased in nu.mbers, and its 
appearance and discipline were subjects of comment among its comrades. General Rose- 
crans s wife presented the members of the "Roll of Honor" with their ribbons, and pinned 
them herself on the breasts of the veterans. The city of Cincinnati presented the regiment 
with an elegant National standard, in appreciation of its gallantry and daring. The Tenth fol 
lowed Rosecrans to the Tennessee River, and was present at Chickamauga, where it was again 
officially noticed for its efficiency in the performance of its duties. 

When General Thomas assumed command of the army, he retained the regiment as head 
quarters guard, and with him it was present at Mission Ridge, Buzzard s Roost, Rocky Face 
Ridge, Resaca, and as far in the Atlanta campaign as Kingston. 

The regiment s term of service having nearly expired, a day was fixed for its departure, 
and it was drawn up in line in front of General Thomas s head-quarters. The General, contrary 
to his usual custom, spoke a few words of parting cheer, and kindly eulogized the regiment for 
its bearing on all occasions. The Chief of Staff, General W. D. Whipple, addressed the regi 
ment a very complimentary letter, expressing his great regret that the army was going to lose 
the "glorious old Tenth Ohio." The boys gave "three times three" for General Thomas, the 
same for the Army of the Cumberland ; and, concluding with three cheers for the cause of the 
Union, filed off on their way to their long absent homes and friends. At Cincinnati the 
friends of the regiment greeted it with a cordial welcome ; and though it did not return bear 
ing the trophies and spoils of war, it bore that which was far better, an unsullied fame. Its 
ranks were thinned and its banners were blood-stained and torn ; and of the thousand brave 
hearts that beat the day they pledged their lives for the protection of their colors, but few 
remained to tell of Lytle and the Tenth Ohio. 



ELEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



81 



llth REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE 


OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


KEMAUKS. 




,T\MESF. HARRISON 


April 


25, 1861 


April 


2.5, 1861 




Lt. Colon.-].... 
Major 


JOSKIMI W. FlMZKLT 

AUGUSTUS II. COLEMAN 
Calvin .1 Cliilds 




2 /, " 
1.") " 




29, " 
29, " 
15 " 




1)0 


Thus; L P Drl riese 


it 


22 " 


t 


22 " 




Do 


Robert A. Knox 


" 


24, " 





24, " 




Do 


John C. La-igston 


" 


1 <> 





19, " 




Do 


Michael I . Nolan 


" 


20, " 





20, " 




Do 


Jonathan < ranor 


, 


>Q " 


i 


20 " 




Do 
1st Lieutenant 

1)0. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do 


.Mm 31. Newkirk 
Geonie W. Hatfield 
Samuel Ahvard 
Charles Calkins 
II en rv S. Uavenscrol t 
Jackson Shade 
Faac S. Clark .. .. 


| 


15^ | 

20* 
21), 
lit, 
IS 





23, " 
15, | 

20^ " 
20, 
1 .), 
18 




Do 


Samuel B Smith 




20 


it 


20, 




Do. 


Cornelius N. Iloagland 





24, 


" 


24, 




Do 






23 " 




23 " 




Do 


Ira B Gibbs 


May 


21 " 


May 


21 " 








\pril 


1 "> " 


\pril 






Do 










22 " 




Do. 
Do 


Thus. J. McDowell 


|| 


20 " 
20 " 


u 


20, " 
20 " 




Do. 


Hi rani Moore 


it 


22* " 


it 


22^ " 




Do. - 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Solomon Teverbaugh 
Robert Patterson 
Jerome B. Weller 
Thomas V. Cooper 


!! 


18, " 
20, " 
24, " 
20, " 
3 " 


|| 


18, " 
20, " 
24, " 

20, " 

9.5 i i 




Do. 


Win. H. II Uah a trail 


May 


21 " 


May 


21, " 




Do. 


J. H Morton. ... 




22 " 
























ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF SANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Major 
Do 


CHAS. A. DEVILLIERS... 
AUGTSTUS ir. COLEMAN 

PHILANDER P. LANE.... 
OGDEN STREET 


July 
April 
Sept. 
Oct. 
July 
Jan., 
Sept. 
Feb. 
July 
Jan. 
Oct. 
July 
Oct. 
July 

Dec. 
Alls. 
July 
Jan. 
June 

July 

Auer. 

Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
April 


6, 
23, 
17, 
26, 
<>, 
9, 
17, 
23, 
6, 
9i 
1, 
7, 
26, 

III 
9, 
2, 
11, 
10, 
31, 
14, 
14, 
17, 
18, 
19, 

7! 
23, 

26, 
12, 

lv, 
9, 
18, 


1861 

1862 

1863 

1861 
1862 

1865 
1861 

IN;: 

1861 
18f>2 
1861 

i 162 

1863 
1861 

l.,;v 
1861 

1862 


July 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
July 
Ja n . 
Nov. 
Feb. 
July 
Feb. 
Nov. 
July 
Nov. 
Oct. 
July 

Tan. 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
June 

Oct. 

July 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Jan. 

June 


6, 1861 
17, 1SB2 
9, " 
10, 18^4 
6, 1861 
9, 1862 
12, " 
23, 1865 
6, 1861 
5, 1862 
12, " 
7, 1861 

11), 18fi3 
23, 1861 
23, l.sc.2 

O J t b 

24, 1863 
11, " 
23, 1861 
12, 1S62 
14, 1861 
14, " 
17, " 
18, " 
19 " 
23, " 
23, " 
29, " 
21, " 
12, " 
10. 1862 

i! 


Dismissed from service April 23, 1862. 
Killed September 17, 1862. 
Resigned October 26, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned December 21, ISbl. 
Killed September 17, 1862. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out as Captain June 11, 1865. 
Promoted to Colonel January 9, 1862. 
Resigned October 1, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned September 25, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
designed July 11, 1862. 
Resigned October 1, 1862. 
Resigned February 8, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned January IS, 1862. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned May 1, 1862. 
Resigned September 20, 1861. 
Resigned December 28, 1861. 
Resigned Octobers, 1861. 
Hi-signed April 18, 1862. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Sept. 17, 62. 
Promoted to Colonel September 17, 1862. 
Promoted to Major October 1, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
{esigned September 30, 1862. 
Resigned June 7, 1863. 
Resigned November 20, 1862. 




AUGUSTUS H. COLEMAN 
OGDEN STREET 
D. CLINTON STUBBS 


AUGUSTUS PI. COLEMAN 
LYMAN J. JACKSON 


Do 
Burgeon 
-Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Do 
Captain 
Do. , 
Do 
Do 

& 




J. FRANK GABRIKL 
JOHN McCcRDY 
Hi NRY Z GILL 


S. HUDSON 


A. C. McNui T 


N. II. STDWKLL 
A. B. HARTMAN 


GKOHOK W. Duuois 
WM. W. LYLK 
Calvin J. Cliilds 
Stephen Johnson 
John C. Drurv 
Thos. L. P. Delriese 
John V. Curtis 


Do iPhilander P. Lane 
Do Asa Iliggins 
Do Alexander Duncan 
Do Solomon Teverbaugh 
Do iWin. S. Douglas 
Do ,<;,.,, !,. W. ilattield 
Do Henry L. Sevmour 
Do. . ij.-romc B Wdler 


Do (Joseph P. Staley 
I>< Lewis (.!. Bn.v.-n 
Do Xmmor 11. Price 

VOL. II. G. 


Aug. 
Sept. 


9, 
17] 





Oct. 
Nov. 


2, " itesigned June s l, 1863. 
3, " Mustered out. 
12, " 1 Mustered out. 



82 



OHIO I:N THE WAR. 



RAXK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 

bo 

Do 


George Johnson 
Andrew H. Chapman 


Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
April 
June 

Feb. 
Juno 

July 

Aug. 

Oct. 
Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 
April 

May 
June 
May 
June 
Aug. 

June 
Sept. 

June 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Mav 
April 
Mav 
April 
Juno 


17, 1862 
1, " 
20, " 
18, 186> 
7, ^ 
21, " 
29, 1864 
2.",, 1865 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
14, 18(11 
17, " 
I", " 
20, " 
20, || 

7 !, 
26 , " 

1 :: 

19 , || 

26 ! " 

26, " 
9, 1862 
10, " 
18, " 
1, " 
5, " 
1, " 
5, || 

20 1 " 
16, " 
17, " 
17, " 
5, 
1, 
20, 
1", 
29, 
22, " 
IS, " 
7, " 
21, " 
29, IS .-} 
29, " 
29, " 


Nov. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Aug. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

June 

Oct. 
July 

Sept.. 
Jan. 
Nov. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Jan. 
May 
June 

Sept. 
Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Feb. 
Julv 
Aug. 

Nov. 
Feb. 

June 

Oct. 
July 

X: 

Dec. 

Jan. 

May 
June 

Oct. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Feb. 


12, 1862 
30, " 
10, 1863 
25, " 
25, " 
25, " 
12, 1864 
23, 1865 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
14, 1861 
17, " 
19, " 
20, " 
20, " 
23, " 
", " 
29, " 
21, " 
10, 1862 
12, 1861 
29, " 
2, " 
21, " 
26, " 
26, " 
9, 1862 
1, " 
3, " 
3, " 
24, " 
24, " 
6, " 
2, " 
3, " 
12, " 
12, || 

30^ " 
30, " 

10, 1863 
20, " 

2. r >) " 

25, " 
25, " 
25, " 
12, 1864 
12, " 
12, " 
23, 1865 

i; " 

23, " 
14, 1861 
14, " 
17. " 
18, | 

23) 
23, 
29, | 

2! 
26, 
26, 
26, 
26, 
9, 1862 



\\ 
3, 
3, 
3, 
24, 
24, 
24, 
2, 

A ; 

24, 
21, 1863 
21, " 
10, " 
10, " 
10, " 


Resigned December 16, 1863. 
Resigned February 12, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Killed in action November 25, 1863. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out as 1st TJ km tenant June 11, 1865. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant June 11, 1^65. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned November 12. 1861. 
Promoted April IS, 1862. 
Promoted January 9, 1862. 
Resigned August 11, 1861. 
Promoted September 17. 1862. 
Resigned November 2, 1861. 
Resigned April 10, 1862. 
Deceased. 
Promoted December 19, 186!. 
Resigned June 5, 1862. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Resigned Mav, 1862. 
Promoted May 1, 1862, to Captain. 
Resigned June 16, 1862: 
Resigned June 6, 1862. 
Promoted September 17, 1862, to Captain. 
Promoted October 1, 1862, to Captain. 
Promoted November 20, 1862 to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Resigned March 17, 1863. 
Died of wounds November 26, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Resigned April 29, 1863 
Resigned February 22, 1864. 
Resigned May 22, 1863. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Mustered out June 20, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant May 15, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out June 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned September 6, 1861. 
Promoted December 26, 1861. 
Promoted December 21, 1861. 
Promoted December 26, 1861. 
Promoted October 28, 1861. 
Resigned November 8, 1861. 
Promoted January 9, 1862. 
Promoted April 10, 1862. 
Promoted Mav 1, 1862. 
Resigned June 3, 1862. 
Resigned June 19, 1862. 
Resigned April 10, 1862. 
Promoted June 5, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted April 18, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted May 1, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted June 16, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted Sept. 17, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Promoted June 5, 1862, to First Lieutenant. 
Dismissed November 19, 1862. 
Promoted Sept. 17, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted October 1, 1*62, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Ilonorablv discharged September 15, 1863. 
Promoted Nov. 20, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant, 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Dismissed November 24, 1863. 
Resigned May 25, 1863. 
Died January 9, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

BS: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


D. K. Curtiss 
E. C. Jordan 
Robert C. Morris 
D. Clinton Stubbs 
Francis M. Osden 
Francis M. Wilmington.... 


David W Maurice 


Solomon Teverbaugh 
Cornelius N. Hoagland 


George W. Hatfield 
J. D. Shannon. 


George P. Darron 
Charles B. Lindsley 
John E Alexander 


Wm. S. Douglas 
Newton S. McAbee 
John W. McAbee 
Silas Honey 


Jerome B. Weller 
C. J. Cottingham 
Joshua H Ilorton 


George Johnson 
Andrew H. Chapman 
David M. Layman 
K. C. Jordan 
Wm Crumbaugh 


D. K. Curtiss 
Theodore Cox 
Francis W. Anderton 
George E. Peck 


Robert C. Morris 
P. A. Arthur 
Chas. P. A chuff. 
Chas. J. McClure 
Wm. K. Young 
Martin L. Edwards 
Thomas L. Stewart 
George S. Swain 
John Honey 
Cyrenius Longley 


Milton H. Wilson 


Francis M. Wilmington.... 
John W. Green 


Don Carlos Sherman 


June 

July 

Sept. 
Dec. 

Jan. 
April 

May 
April 
June 

May 
AUET. 

as 

Nov. 

Oct. 
June 
Sept. 
Oct. 


1; 

2. 5, " 
M, 1861 
14, 
17, 
18, 
11), 

23; 
2, 
19, 
26, 
2(1, 
26^ 
2G, 
9, 1862 
9, " 
10, " 
18, " 
1, 
10, 
19, 

; : 

9, 

16 
29, 
19, 
1, 
5, 
17, 
1, 


Charles Abbott ... 


John W LaRue 


Joshua H. Ilorton 


Jerome B Weller 




W. H. II. Gahagan 




Geo. Johnson 


Andrew H. Chapman 
D. K. Curtiss 
James M. Elliott 


Joseph P. Staley 


Smith Williams 


Wm. Crumbaugh 
David M. Layman 
E. C. Jordan 


Robert C. Morris 
P. A. Arthur 
Chas. J. McClure 
Wm. M. Culbertson 
Charles P. Achuff. 


Wm. K. Young 


Samuel A. Collins 


M. L. Edwards 


Tlios. L. Stewart 
Cyrenius Longlev 
Alfred L. Conklin 


Jesse G. Buckingham 
Thos. M. Mitchell 
John Ronev 
Lucius II. Hollabird.... 


Joseph Pearson 
John C. Keifibar 


Louis Gibbs 
J. S. Morrison 


April 
May 


29, 1863 

22, 


Aug. 


25, " 
25, " 


Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 


John W. Gre^n 
Francis M. Wilmington.... 
Isaac McKenzie 
T. L. Winslow 
Mark Kirhv 


March 
April 
June 

March 


17, " 

18, ; 

2") , 

:*9, 

29, 

1, 1865 
1, " 
1, " 
1, " 


July 
Aug. 

Nov. 
Man 


2o] " 
25, " 
25, " 
25, " 
12, 1864 
12, " 
h 1, 1865 
1, " 
1, " 
1, " 


Not mustered. 
Not mustered. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 

Mustered out June 11, 1865. 


David W. Maurice 
Corbly Kinney 
Porter Livian. 
John T. Selman 
John T Hunt 





ELEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY, 83 



ELEVENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THIS regiment was raised in the counties of Miami, Clinton, Hamilton, Montgomery, 
and Columbiana, and mustered into the service for three "months, at Camp Dennison, 
in April, 1SG1. The regiment was reorganized and mustered into the service for three 
years on the 20th of June, 1801, and on the 7th of July was ordered to the Kanawha Valley. 

It arrived at Point Pleasant on the llth, and formed a part of the celebrated Kanawha 
Division, commanded by General J. D. Cox. On the 26th of July General Cox began his 
movement up the Kanawha, but on reaching the Pocotaligo Kiver, it was found that the Rebels 
had burned the bridge. Captain Lane, of the Eleventh, with his company, composed princi 
pally of mechanics, rebuilt the bridge in less than twenty-four hours, with no tools but a few 
axes and two or three augers, and the army proceeded with but little delay. During the fall 
and early part of the winter the regiment remained in the vicinity of Gauley Bridge, never idle, 
but continually on a reconnoissance, a raid, or a scout, and was actively engaged at Cotton Hill 
and Sewell Mountain. 

On the 1st of December, 1861, the regiment fell back from Gauley Bridge to Point Pleasant, 
and went into winter-quarters. While here nothing occurred to break the monotony of camp 
life. A regimental church was organized, which was kept up until the regiment was mustered out. 
Members were received either upon presenting a certificate of membership in some church 
at home, or upon profession of belief in God and the Holy Spirit, and of faith in Jesus Christ. 

On the 16th of April, 1862, the regiment left Point Pleasant, and proceeded by way of Win- 
field to Gauley Bridge. In the campaign of the Kanawha, the regiment accompanied General 
Cox as far as Raleigh, where it was ordered to remain until further orders. Floyd, on his 
retreat from Cotton Mountain, had completely blockaded the road from Shady Springs to Pack s 
Ferry, at New River, a distance of sixteen miles. Two companies (G and K) of the Eleventh 
were detailed to open and guard the road. One-half of the men were under arms while the 
other half were at work with spades and axes ; and, after great labor, on the evening of the fifth 
day they reached the ferry, having cleared the road and rendered it available for artillery and 
supply trains. In a short time two boats were built out of the timber in a barn near by, with 
the use of one auger and a few axes, and by joining the two boats, they formed a ferry-boat 
one hundred and forty feet long, and communication was thus opened between the two wings of 
the Kanawha army. In the latter part of July the regiment returned to Gauley Bridge, and com 
pany C was ordered to Summerville to re-enforce a detachment of the Ninth Virginia, stationed 
there, and remained until the regiment moved to Washington City. 

On the 18th of August the Eleventh, with the greater portion of the Kanawha Division, 
moved to Parkersburg, and proceeded thence, by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to Washing 
ton, District of Columbia, encamping near Alexandria. On the 27th of August the Eleventh 
Ohio, under General Scammon, was ordered to Manassas Junction, demonstrations being 
made in that direction by a Rebel force. Upon arriving at Fairfax Station it was found that 
the Rebels had taken possession of the fortifications at Manassas, and that Taylor s brigade 
of New Jersey troops was falling back. The regiment crossed Bull Run, formed in line near to 
the railroad, and checked a flanking movement of the enemy. Companies E and F, of the 



84 Oino ix THE WAE. 

Eleventh, were placed in a position guarding tlie approaches to the railroad and a ford, and the 
remainder of the regiment went into action. The National forces only numbered three thou 
sand, and it was impossible to contend successfully against the combined forces of Ewell and 
Fitzhugh Lee ; so that at three o clock orders wore given to fall back to Fairfax. The regiment 
acted as rear guard in the retreat, and its cool and determined bravery did much toward secur 
ing the safety of the whole column. At Fairfax the troops " formed square," the station build 
ing, in which the wounded were placed, being in the center. 

After resting until half-past ten the columns were re-formed, cautiously and secretly, and by 
twelve o clock on the 28th the Eleventh reached the vicinity of the defenses around Washington. 

On the 29th of August the entire Kanawha Division moved to the front, and the Eleventh 
was posted at Fort Munson, on Munson s Hill. On the 6th of September the regiment moved 
toward Maryland, and on the llth halted near Eidgeville, and the next day reached the Eebel 
picket-line in the vicinity of Frederick City. The Eebels were posted on the banks of the Mo- 
nocacy, holding the bridge across the stream. Three attacking columns were formed, with 
the Eleventh in the advance of the center, and advanced against the Eebels. The center 
column gained the bridge and drove the enemy from it. A charge was ordered, but the line 
was thrown into some confusion, and the Eebels rallied and captured two pieces of artillery. 
General Cox called to Colonel Coleman : "Will the Eleventh recover those guns?" With a 
loud cheer the regiment dashed at the Eebels, drove them from the guns, and still pressed on 
cheering and charging, advancing into the city, and only halting when the enemy was com 
pletely routed. That night the Kanawha Division bivouacked near the city, and by the even 
ing of the next day advanced to Catoctin Creek, near Middletown, the Eleventh being posted 
near the bridge. 

Next morning the division crossed the creek and moved toward Turner s Gap, in South 
Mountain. After proceeding a short distance the division moved to the left and struck the old 
Sharpsburg road, and upon reaching a narrow gorge, concealed by timber and undergrowth, the 
Eleventh formed in line of battle. When the order came to charge, the Eleventh moved along 
the edge of a strip of woods, and by adroitness and bravery drove back a strong force of the Eebels 
attempting a flank movement. The regiment was exposed to a galling fire from sharpshooters, 
but not a man flinched. One old man, Nathan Whittaker, of company E, who had two sons in the 
regiment, exhibited wonderful bravery in standing a pace or two in advance, and coolly loading 
and firing as if at a target, while the enemy s bullets were falling like hail all around him. 
About noon there was a lull in the battle-storm, but about three o clock the entire National line 
advanced, fighting desperately. The Eleventh was ordered to charge across an open field on 
the left of the road, against a force of the enemy protected by a stone wall. They met the 
enemy in almost a hand-to-hand fight ; muskets were clubbed and bayonets crossed over the low 
stone wall, but finally the enemy was driven from their position into the undergrowth. The 
Eebels retreated toward Sharpsburg during the night, and at an early hour next morning the 
National army was in pursuit. 

The night before the battle of Antietam the Kanawha Division, under General Crook, 
moved into position near the lower bridge, which crosses the Antietam .on the Eorheback farm, 
the Eleventh being posted a little above the bridge on a rough, wooded slope. At ten o clock 
A. M., on the 17th of September, an assault was ordered upon the bridge, but they were met 
with such a heavy fire from the bluffs opposite that they were compelled to retire. At this 
juncture an order was received from General McClellan to carry the Ibridu-e at all hazards. 
The Eleventh was to lead the storming party, and while advancing steadily/ and determinedly 
Colonel Coleman fell mortally wounded. The regiment wavered an instant and then pressed 
on, gained the bridge, crossed it, scaled the bluffs, and drove the Eebels from their position. 

On the morning of the 8th of October the division commanded by General Crook moved to 
Hagerstown. The men suffered greatly from the heat and dust, and though accustomed to forced 
marches, this was one of the most severe the regiment ever endured. The troops moved on to 
the Potomac at Hancock, and there took the Baltimore and Ohio Eailroad for Clarksburg. At 



ELEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 85 

Clarksburg the regiment suffered greatly for the want of clothing. In addition to this they 
were without blankets and tents, and this, too, when they were among the mountains of Vir 
ginia, exposed to the storms of November. In this condition the division took up the line of 
march, and was distributed at different points along the Kanawha and Gauley Rivers, the 
Eleventh being assigned to Summerville, which was to be held as an outpost of the forces in the 
Kanawha Valley. Here the regiment erected comfortable winter-quarters, and rapidly recov 
ered from the effects of its severe campaign. A small portion of the regiment was mounted 
and was employed in guarding the fords of the Gamey, while the remainder fortitied the position 
at Summerville. During their stay here the Eleventh, forming a junction with the Second 
Virginia Cavalry at a designated point, engaged in a successful expedition into the Greenbrier 
country. While on the march the men were exposed to many hardships and suffered greatly 
from the inclemency of the weather, several being temporarily disabled by being frost-bitten. 

On the 24th of January, 1863, the regiment marched for Loup Creek Landing, and there 
embarked on steamer T. J. Patton. On arriving at Gallipolis the lleet was increased to ten 
steamers, under command of General Crook, and proceeded to Nashville, Tennessee. On the 22d 
of February the entire division moved to Carthage, on the Tennessee River, occupied the 
heights north-east of the town and fortified the position. On the 24th of March the regiment 
went on a scout to Rome, and returned next day with a Captain, twenty-eight privates, a wagon- 
train and about seventy horses and mules, belonging to Forrest s cavalry, as the fruits of the 
expedition. On the 13th of April the Eleventh, with other regiments, under command of 
Colonel Lane, made a reconnoissance toward McMinnville, and met the enemy strongly posted 
with artillery and cavalry. After making a careful disposition of the force Colonel Lane sent 
a request for artillery. Meanwhile the Rebels had made several dashes at the line, but were 
repulsed. No artillery arrived; but General Spear was sent out by General Crook and ordered 
the troops back to Carthage. On the 23d of April the Eleventh and Eighty-Ninth Regiments 
marched, with three days rations, to join General Reynolds, moving from Murfreesboro against 
Wheeler and Forrest s cavalry. The enemy retired, and nothing was accomplished except the 
destruction of some supplies; after which both forces returned to their former stations. The 
regiment marched to Murfreesboro , arriving on the 27th of June, and was assigned to the Third 
Division (General Reynolds commanding), Fourteenth Army Corps (General Geo. H. Thomas 
commanding). 

On the 24th of June Reynolds s division moved out the Manchester road and engaged the 
enemy at Hoover s Gap. The Eleventh was under arms all night, and after the enemy was 
driven back it pressed on and led the advance into Manchester, capturing a number of Rebels. 
The entire brigade bivouacked south-west of the town. On the morning of the 29th the brig 
ade, with the Eleventh in the advance, moved on the Tullahoma road. The enemy was met 
about noon, but was soon driven back. The next day the march was continued, and on the 1st 
of July Crook s brigade entered Tullahoma. The regiment pursued the Rebels, and finally 
halted near Big Springs, and within two miles of Dechcrd Station, on the Nashville and Chat 
tanooga Railroad. At this point General Crook was appointed to the command of a cavalry 
brigade, and General J. B. Turchin assumed command of the Second Brigade. On the 2d of 
August the brigade moved to University and on to Blue Springs and Jasper, and crossed the 
Tennessee River at Shell Mound on the 1st of September. The troops were soon again on the 
march, and on the 5th Reynolds s division took possession of Trenton. From here the regiment 
moved through Cooper s Gap into McLemore s Cove, and continued to gradually close in upon 
the Rebels. On the 17th the Rebels made an assault on the position held by the Eleventh at 
Catlett s Gap and were repulsed. 

During the forenoon of the 18th the regiment, in common with other regiments, changed 
position several times in order to bewilder the enemy, and at night the whole corps moved, and 
soon after daylight went into line of battle near Gordon s Mill, the Eleventh forming on a 
wooded slope on the east of the Lafayette and Rossville road. Chaplain Lyle rode to the center 
of the line, and, with Colonel Lane s consent, addressed the regiment in words of comfort and 



86 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

encouragement, and asked the men to join with him in prayer. Instantly every head was un 
covered and every hand clasped devoutly on the gleaming muskets. The old colors, pierced 
and rent on many battle-fields, were drooped, and amid the rattle of musketry the voice of 
prayer, a strange hut glorious sound, was heard. General Reynolds, who was passing during 
the exercises, halted till their conclusion, and then, grasping the Chaplain cordially by the hand, 
expressed his delight at being present. 

Immediately the regiment was moved to the support of some regiments already hotly 
engaged, and soon after it moved into the front line. The enemy s sharpshooters annoyed the 
regiment greatly, and at last the order to charge was given and the Rebels were driven back. In 
this charge Sergeant Peck, the color-bearer, was wounded, but his brother instantly seized the 
colors and led the line most gallantly. In the afternoon, when the enemy were pressing the right 
of Reynolds s division, Turchin s brigade changed front and charged the enemy, driving them 
back in disorder. The next day the Eleventh took position on a slight elevation behind a rude 
breastwork of logs and stones. The enemy s fire was so severe that in less than half an hour 
company D lost one-half of its men killed and wounded. The rude breastwork behind which 
the regiment sought protection several times caught fire, and at the third time in burned so rap 
idly that it was necessary to have it extinguished. Company B volunteered for the dangerous 
work and succeeded in putting out the fire effectually. In the afternoon the enemy succeeded 
in getting in the rear of Reynolds s division through a gap in the line of battle, and the Elev 
enth was exposed to a heavy cross-fire. Turchin s brigade was ordered to charge the enemy in 
the rear, which was done in gallant style. The Rebel ranks were broken and many prisoners 
and guns captured. In the night the troops withdrew to Rossville, and from there to Chatta 
nooga. On the 24th the regiment formed part of a heavy reconnoitering force, and was engaged 
in a severe skirmish with the enemy, after which it withdrew and was posted within the line of 
rifle-pits to the left of Fort Negley. 

Later in the month the regiment marched down the river, and co-operating at Brown s Ferry 
with a force that floated down in pontoons, gained a foothold on Lookout Mountain. On the 23d 
of November the regiment took position in front of Fort Negley, but next morning was placed in 
front of Fort Wood, and in the afternoon advanced on Mission Ridge. In the charge the regi 
ment captured one battle-flag and a quantity of artillery and small arms. Sergeant Bull, who 
was carrying the colors of the Eleventh, was struck several times, but still pressed on until, 
struck the seventh time, he was unable to rise. Lieutenant Peck seized the colors, planted them 
on the Rebel ramparts, and almost instantly fell mortally wounded. The regiment pursued the 
enemy toward Ringgold, and after some severe fighting at Ringgold Gap, returned to Chatta 
nooga. On the 17th of February, 1864, the regiment was paraded in full view of Lookout 
Mountain and Mission Ridge, and presented by Chaplain Lyle with a stand of colors in the 
name of the donors, the ladies of Troy, Ohio. The regiment was engaged in a reconnoissance 
toward Rocky Face Ridge, and advancing as far as Buzzard s Roost, the enemy was found in 
strong position. By some mistake the Eleventh was ordered to charge up a steep hill held by 
two brigades and several pieces of artillery. The regiment advanced bravely, but after heroic 
efforts was compelled to fall back with a loss of one-sixth of its men. 

The troops fell back to Ringgold, and on the 26th of March the veterans of the regiment, 
numbering about two hundred, returned to Ohio for the purpose of recruiting, so that when the 
regiment should be mustered out the name and organization might still be continued. The reg 
iment remained at Ringgold on garrison duty till the 10th of June, when it proceeded to Cin 
cinnati, Ohio, where it received a hearty welcome. 

The regiment was mustered out at Camp Dennison on the 21st of June, 1864. 

Two companies, whose time had not yet expired, and the veterans of the regiment, were 
officially recognized as the Eleventh Ohio Detachment, and were assigned to Baird s division 
of the Fourteenth Corps. They accompanied Sherman in his wonderful campaign, and after 
the surrender of the Rebel armies were mustered out. They were commanded by Lieutenant- 
Colonel D. C. Stubbs, promoted from Sergeant-Major of the old organization. 



TWELFTH OHIO INFANTKY. 



87 



12th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



EANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 




JOHN W. LOWE 

JACOB \MMEN . 


May 2, 1861 
" 2, " 
2, " 
April 19, " 
May 2, " 
April 20, " 
R 19; " 
" 26, " 
May 3, " 
April 22, " 
19, " 
" 24, " 
May 4, " 
" 4 > 
April 20, 
20, 
19, 
26, 
May 3, 
April 22, 
May 14, 
April 24, 
May 14, 


May 

April 
May 
April 

May 
April 

May 
April 

May 

April 
Mav 
April 
May 


2, 1861 
2, " 
2, " 
19, " 

2, " 
20, " 
19, " 

I 

19, " 
24, " 
4, " 
4, " 
20, " 
20, " 
19, " 
26, " 

J; " 

14, " 
14, " 


Resigned July 25, 1861. 
r 


Lt Colonel 


Major 
Surgeon 
Ass t Surgeon 
Captain 


CAIIK B. WHITE 
WM. W. HOLMES 
C. 11. SWAIN 

James D Wallace 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Robert 15. Harlan 
Watts McMurchy 


Robert Lytle 


Albert, Galloway 
Rigdon Williams 


Joseph L. Hilt 
Edward M. Carey 


Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Win. Havs 


James Sloan 
Henry S. Clements 
A/,ariah W. Doane 
Thomas G. Wood 
jiiigh McCIung 
Andrew J. Thorp 
Daniel W. Paulev 
Joel II Deardorf 


Richard C. Raiikin 


Benjamin R. A. Jones 
Jonathan I) Hinc< 


April 20, " 

".-!> I: :; 

April 20, " 
14, " 
26, 
19, 
22, 
" 19, 
" 24, 
4, " 
" 4, " 
" 20, " 


April 

May 

April 


20* " 
2, " 

J: " 

14, " 

26, " 
19, " 
22, " 
19, " 
24, " 
4, " 
4, " 
20, " 




John W. Bowser 
Isaac B. Alien 


Tirman C. Warren 
Moses W. Trader 


Win. H.Hivling 
J. Whitcomb Ross 
Robert Wilson 
Alexander M. Ridgwav 
Chas F. Kin? . 
Win. P. Cowne 


ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 


RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


JOHN W LOWE 


June 23, 1861 
Sept. 10, " 
. une 28, " 
Sept. 10, " 
June 28, " 
Sept. 10, " 
April 18, 1862 
March 15, 1864 


Aug. 
Oct. 
Aug. 
Oct. 

Aug. 
Oct. 
June 
March 


31, 1861 

3 I: " 

i, " 

31, " 
1, " 
3, 1862 
1.0, 1864 


Killed at Carnifex Ferry 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Promoted to Colonel September 10, 1861. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Sept. 10, 61. 
Resigned April 18, 1862. 
Dismissed March 7, 1864. 
Mustered out. Feb. 7, 1S65. 
Resigned April 25, 1862. 
Resigned December 28, 1862. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Promoted to Surgeon May 1, 1862. 
Resigned December 8, 1862. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned July 25, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major April 18, 1S62. 
Resigned November 21, 1861. 
Cashiered December 9, 1863. 
Promoted to Major. [Gen. Sigel. 
Detached at Cumberland, Md., by order of 
Resigned October 24, 1861. 
R.-signed March 31. 1862. 
Replied June 20, l.*62. 
{(signed March 20, 1862. I Aug. 30. 62. 
Mustered out ; appointed Major 79th 0. V. I.. 
Resigned June 18, 1862. 
Resigned June 20, 1862. 
Deceased September 21, 1362. 
Resigned October 1, 1862. 
llositrned October 3, 1852. 
Promoted by President. 


Do 
Lt. Colonel .... 
Do 
Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 


CARR B. WHITE 
CARR B. WHITE 
JONATHAN D. 11 INKS 
JONATHAN D. HINES 

J\MES D W 7 A1,LACE . . . 


EDWARD M. CAREY 
RK;DO\ WILLIYMS 




WM W HOLMFS 


Do. . 


WM T RIDENOUK 


May 1, 1862 
Dec. 28, " 


May 
Fel). 
Nov. 
Mny 
July- 
Jan. 
May 
Dec. 
May 
Aug. 

Oct. 
Nov. 
fan. 
April 
Juno 
July 


1. 1862 
23, 1863 
12, 1861 
1, 1862 
23, " 
2, 1863 
6, " 
16, 1861 
0, 1863 
31, 1861 
31, " 
31, " 
31, " 
31, " 
31, " 
31, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
1, 
9, 
9, 1862 
21, " 
3, " 
16, " 1 
16, " 1 


Do. 

Ags t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Do 


N. F. GRAHAM 




May V, 1862 
July 13, " 
Jan. 2, 1863 
May 6, " 
Aug. 10, 1861 
Julv 2"), 1862 
May 30, 1861 
June 4, " 
6, " 

ll] " 
" 11, " 
" 18, " 
" IS, " 
22, " 
" 28, " 
Sept. 10, " 
Nov. 9, " 
Jin. 9, 1862 
March 31, " 
April 18, " 
June 18, " 
20, " 


N F GRAHAM 


HOR\CE P KAY. 


SILAS T. BUCK 


RUSSELL D. VAN DUSEN 


Captain 
Do. 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

6S: ::::::::: 

Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


James D. Wallace 
Edward M. Carey 


Wm. B. Smith 
Rigdon Williams 


Joseph L. Hilt. 
A /ariah W. Doane 
Watts McMurchy 
Andrew Lc"-" 


Ferdinand Gunckle 
Henry 8. Clement 
John Curtis 


Do 
Do 
Do 

DO ; 


Wm. W. Lisrgett 
Daniel W. Pan ley 
Win. E. Fisher 
Ileurv F. IlawUes 



88 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 
Do 

Do 


Jonathan C. Wallace 
John Lewis 
Robert Wilson 


March 20, 1862 
" 20, " 
" 20, " 
Aug. 30, " 


July 
Nov. 


16. 1862 
If), " 
12, " 


Declined. 
Resigned December 2, 1862. 
Mustered out July 11, 1*64. 
Killed May 9. 1864. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 


Do 
Do 
Do 


Aaron N. Channel! 


HoiatioG. Tihhalls 


Oct. 1, " 


Dec. 


. n ,o, " 


Do 
Do 
Do 


Jonathan Wallace Dec. 2\ " 


M-ircl 


;io, " 


Mustered out July 11, 1864. 


Ashlev Brown 


Dec. 9, " 
Mav 30, 1861 
June 4, " 

i, " 

7, " 
11, " 
" 11, " 


Jan. 
Aug. 


31* IN.1 

31, " 
31, " 
31, " 
31, " 
31, " 


Mustered out July if, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain September 10, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain March 31, 1862. 
Resigned October 24, 1861. 
Died September 25, 1861. 
romoted to Captain April 18, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain June 20, 1862. 


let Li utcuaut 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
t Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
I o. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Ifenrv S. Clement 
Win W Li"-o-ett 


Win P Con ii" 


George W Goorle. . 


Daniel W Paulev 


Kobert Wilson 


Alex. M. Ridgwav 
Jonathan C. Wallace 
Ashlev I5rown .. . 


]8j .; 

Julv ~2\ " 
Sept. 1U, " 
26, " 
Oct. 3, " 
Nov. S, " 
Dec. 6, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 
March 31, " 
" 31, " 
April 18, 
June 18, 
is, 
20, 
20, 


July 

Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Ian. 
April 

hino 
July 


31, " 

21: 

31, " 

?: 
% 

1: :: 

9, 18(12 
21 " 
2l " 
3, " 
1 6, 
lt>, " 

18: " 


Resigned March 3J 1862. 
Promoted to Captain December 2, 1*62 
Promoted to Captain December 2, 18,62. 
Resigned October 15, 1S61. 
lie-signed August 21, 1-61. 
Promoted to Captain June 18, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain June 20/1862. 
Promoted to Captain June 20, 1862. 
Resigned September 30, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain August 30, 1862. 
Resigned November 24, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain September 21, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain October 3, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain October 1, 1862. 
Canceled. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned December 26, 1862. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 


Andrew J. Roosa 
W. 11. Roberts 
Win. E. Fisher 
Henrv K. Hawkes 
John I ewis 


John Wise 
Aaron N. Channel! 
Calvin Goddard 
James W. Ross 
Jacob A. Yonlv 
Horatio G. Tibballs 
Robert II. Shoemaker 
Hiram McKay 
John C. Campbell 
John V. O Connor 


Win. 11. Glotfelter 
John W. Hilt/. 
Thomas .). Atkinson 
Wm. 15. Neshitt 
Wm. A Lndliun 


Sept. 30, 
.In ne 20, 
Aug. 3i, 
Sept. 21, 
Oct. 1, ; 
" 3, 
Dec 2 


Nov. 
Dec. 


12, 1862 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
30, " 
30, " 


Mistered out July ll , 1864. 
Transferred to 23d 0. V. I. as Captain. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 


Frank M.Shule 


John Lewis 


June 11, 
March 21, L-,63 
Aug. 12, " 
May 30, Is61 
June 4, || 

11. " 

11, " 

LS " 

Oct. "1 , " 
Nov. 9, " 
Dec. 13, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 
9, " 

March 31, " 
31, " 
April 18, " 
IS, " 
June is, " 
20, 
" 20, 
" 20, 


Tune 
May 
Jan. 
Aug. 

>ct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 

May 

Tune 
July 

>ct. 


If), " 
25, 1863 
10, 1864 
31, 1861 
31, || 

3l " 
31, " 
31, " 
31, " 
31, " 


Revoked. 

Transferred to 23d 0. V. I. as Captain. 
Mustered out March 12. 1865. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Sept. 10, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Cashiered March 20, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 31, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 31, 1862. 
Died from wounds rec d at Peter s Creek, Va. 
Resigned April IS, 1862. 






Win E Fisher. 


John Curtis 
Ezra Stevenson 
Moses W Trader 




Tacob A Yordv 


Win. H. MiH-r. 
Alon/.o M. Dimmitt 


Horatio G. Til-halls 
Robert II. Shoemaker 
Eli ram McKay 
John C Campbell 


31, " 
1, " 
9, " 
13, " 
9, 1862 
9, " 
9, " 

5, " 

16* " 
16, " 

16J " 
13, " 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant April 18, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieut. June 10/62: r d Jv 17/62 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 20, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 20, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 20, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 20, Ls62. 
Resigned September 30, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant August 30, 1862. 
Resigned October 3, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant September 30, 62. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant September 21, 62. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant October 1, 1862. 
Resigned December 9, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant December 2, 1862. 


John V. O Connor 
JohnW Hilt/, 


Frederick B. Sehnebly 
Thomas J. Atkinson 


Wm H Glotfelter 


Wm. B. Nesbitt 


Win. A. Ludlnm 
Andrew C. Miller 


Win. Sine 
Thomas F. Hill 


Michael B. Mahonv 
Harrison G. Otis... . 


Oct. 3, 
"v pt. 30, 
Oct. 3, 
Sept. 30, 
June 20, 
Aug. 30, 
Dec. 9, 
Oct. 1, 
Dec. 2, 
Oct. 3, 
Jan. 6, 1863 
Aug. 1, " 


Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 
May 


12^ " 
12, " 

12, " 
12, " 

25, " 
19, " 
29 " 

12 1863 

i?; 

19, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant November 24,1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Wounded and prisoner. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Transferred to 23d 0. V. I. as 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 
Transferred to 23d O. V. I. as 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned. 
Killed June 19, 1864. 
Mustered out July 11, 1864. 


John White 


Maurice Wat kins 


[lenrv L. Sherwood 
Robert B. Wilson 


Jonathan H. McMillan 
Abraham King 
John M. Busby 
Fon ton L. Torrence 
Edward R Grim 





TWELFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 89 



TWELFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



UNDER the call for seventy-five thousand three- months, troops the Twelfth Ohio In 
fantry was organized at Camp Jackson, Ohio, on the 3d of May, 18(51. It moved to Camp 
Dennison May 6th, and there re-enlisted, was reorganized and mustered into the ser 
vice for three years on the 28th of June, 1861. 

The Twelfth left Camp Dennison for the Kanawha Valley July 6th ; arrived at Point 
Pleasant on the 9th, and on the 14th reached Pocotaligo River. On the 17th of July the regi 
ment fought the battle of Scary Creek, the enemy being strongly posted beyond a ravine. The 
regiment fought three hours; and after exhausting its ammunition fell back in good order to its 
camp at the mouth of the Pocotaligo, witli a loss of five killed, thirty wounded, and four 
missing. The regiment entered Charleston, West Virginia, on the 25th, and reached Gauley 
Bridge on the 29th, where it captured a large quantity of arms and ammunition. Eight com 
panies marched down the Kanawha to Camp Piatt August 13, and from there moved to Clarks 
burg, West Virginia, and were assigned to General Benham s brigade. Marching south through 
Weston, Sutton and Summerville, they arrived at Carnifex Ferry September 10th, and engaged 
in the battle at that place with a loss of two killed and ten wounded. Two days after this they 
were engaged in a slight skirmish on the Gauley with guerrillas ; then marched to Camp Look 
out, and from there, on October 10th, moved to Hawk s Nest on New River. In the meantime 
the two companies left at Gauley Bridge surprised and routed two hundred Rebel cavalry un 
der Jenkins, on the 25th of August. They were engaged in several skirmishes and reconnois- 
sances, and finally joined the other eight companies at Hawk s Nest on the 16th of October. 
On the 1st of November the Twelfth marched to the mouth of Loop Creek and attempted to flank 
Floyd, who was threatening Gauley. It soon after engaged in the pursuit of Floyd s forces, and 
having followed him until near Raleigh, C. II., gave up the chase and returned to Loop Creek. 
The regiment was transferred to General Cox s brigade December 10th, and moved to Charles 
ton and went into winter-quarters. 

On the 3d of May, 1862, the regiment left Charleston and joined Scammon s brigade at the 
mouth of East River. It skirmished at the narrows of New River, and fell back to Princeton, 
then to Blue Stone River, and then to the summit of Flat Top Mountain and fortified. From 
the 20th of May until the 14th of August the regiment scouted the country in every direction, 
made some heavy inarches in the mountains and captured many "bushwhackers." It was or 
dered to the Army of the Potomac August 15th, and arrived at Alexandria on the 24th. 

It met the enemy at Bull Run Bridge August 27th; was severely engaged for six hours 
against a greatly superior force, and was compelled to fall back to Fairfax Station with a loss 
of nine killed, sixty-eight wounded, (six mortally) and twelve missing. The regiment returned 
to Alexandria, rejoined Cox s brigade and marched to Upton Hill. On the 7th of September it 
advanced into Maryland, and after a sharp skirmish at Monocacy Bridge on the 12th entered 
Frederick City. On the 14th of September it engaged in the battle of South Mountain, par 
ticipating in three bayonet charges and capturing three battle flags, a large number of small 



90 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

arms, and over two hundred prisoner?, with a loss of sixteen killed, ninety-one wounded, and 
eight missing. On the 17th the regiment was engaged at Antietam and lost six killed and 
twenty -nine wounded. After the battle it marched for West Virginia, via Hagerstown and 
Hancock, Maryland ; but, on arriving at Hancock, it moved into Pennsylvania to operate against 
Stuart s cavalry. Stuart having retreated, the Twelfth returned to Hancock, and arrived at 
Clarksburg, Western Virginia, October 16th. The regiment marched from Clarksburg October 
25th, in Crook s division, through Weston, Sutton, and Summerville, endeavoring to gain the 
rear of the Eebel forces in the Kanawha Valley, and arrived at Gauley Bridge November 14th, 
the Eebels having retreated before the division arrived. 

On the 4th of December the regiment marched to Fayette C. H,, West Virginia, and went 
into winter-quarters. Here it was assigned to the Second Brigade, Third Division, Eighth 
Army Corps. The brigade under Colonel White repulsed the enemy s attack on Fayette C. H., 
May 19th, 1863, the regiment losing two killed, nine wounded, and eight missing. It pursued 
the retreating Rebels to Raleigh C. H., and returned to Fayette C. H. On July 13th the Twelfth 
marched against the enemy at Piney Creek, but the Rebels retreated and the regiment returned 
to Fayette C. H. On the 17th the brigade was ordered to Ohio to assist in capturing John Mor 
gan, and after proceeding up the Ohio as far as Blennerhassett s Island and guarding fords for sev 
eral days, it returned to Fayette C. H. During the months of August and September the regiment 
was employed in constructing fortifications. On the 4th of November it marched against Lew- 
isburg, bu-t the enemy fled and it again returned to Fayette C. II. On the 9th of December it 
made another move on Lewisburg as a diversion for General Averill. Bushwhackers were 
very troublesome on this march, and the regiment lost two killed, tAvo slightly, and two mor 
tally wounded, and two missing. The Twelfth went into winter-quarters at Fayette C. H., and 
was engaged in holding outposts and in watching the enemy. 

On the 3d of May, 1864, the regiment left Fayette C. H., marched to Cloyd s Mountain 
and there engaged the enemy on the 9th. The fight lasted over an hour, and the regi 
ment lost eleven killed and sixty-eight wounded, in addition to these Surgeon Graham and 
nineteen men, left on the field in charge of the wounded, fell into the enemy s hands. The 
Twelfth pursued the fleeing Rebels to New River Bridge, where a heavy artillery fight ensued, 
in which the enemy was driven back. The regiment crossed New River at Pepper s Ferrv, 
destroyed a number of bridges and a large amount of property belonging to the Virginia and 
Tennessee Railroad. The Twelfth marched northward, and on the 19th reached Blue Sulphur 
Springs where it remained until the 31st, when it moved on Staunton. Arriving at Staunton 
June 8th, it joined the forces under Hunter, marched southward, flanked Lexington, and on 
the 12th assisted in destroying large quantities of ammunition and in burning the Virginia 
Military Institute. On the 16th it destroyed the railroad between Liberty and Lynchburg and 
burned several large bridges. The next day it moved on Lynchburg, and met the enemy in 
force at Quaker Church, three miles from the city. The Twelfth and Ninety-First Ohio regi 
ments charged the enemy in fine style and drove them back in disorder. The regiment cap 
tured a number of prisoners, and lost eight killed and eleven wounded. The next day the regi 
ment was engaged before the enemy s works but withdrew after dark, and on the 19th marched 
to Liberty. It moved along the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad to Salem, and from there 
proceeded northward, via Catawba Valley, New Castle, Sweet Springs, White Sulphur, Lewis- 
burg and Gauley to Camp Piatt, on the Kanawha, where it arrived June 29th. On this march 
both men and horses suffered considerably from hunger and thirst. 

The regiment was ordered to Columbus, Ohio, July 2d, and was mustered out of the ser 
vice at that city on the llth of July, 1864. 

During its term of service the regiment moved on foot, by rail and by water, a distance of 
four thousand and forty-nine miles, and sustained a loss in killed, wounded and missing, of four 
hundred and fifty-five men. 



THIRTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY 



91 



13th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF BANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 


A. SAUNDERS PIATT 
COLUMBUS 15. MASON 
JOSKPH 8. HAWKINS 
Samuel W Ashmead 


April 

May 

April 


30, 1861 
30, " 
30, " 
1G, " 
1, " 

30, 

10, " 
10, || 

20, " 
22, " 


April 

May 
April 


30, 1S61 
30, " 
30, " 

16, || 

3o " 
10, " 
10, " 
20, " 
20, || 


Resigned June 24, 1.861. 




Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Francis S. Parker 
Don. Piatt 
Beni. P. Kiuikli- 
Albert F. Beach 
Jeremiah Slocum 
Win. Schneider 
.James McGarr 


John A. Corwiti 
Isaac R. Gardiner 


April 
May 

April 


20, 
16, LSlil 

30, " 
10, " 
19, " 

20 " 


Mav 
April 


20, " 
1C., " 

1 1 " 

3o! | ; 
ii! " 

V|) " 


Tlios. II. Roberts 
Klkanan M. Mast 

Nicholas Reitcr 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 


Win. 11. Wallace 
John Conwell 
Daniel G. C olemau 
Reason A. Henderson 





20, " 
.",0, " 
30, " 




20, " 

:!o, " 

30, " 


James A. Leazurc 





ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


WM. S. SMITH 
JOSEPH G. HAWKINS.... 
DWIGIIT JARVIS, JR 
COLUMBUS B. MASON 
J 0.3 r. IMI G. HAWKINS 
BKNJ. P. KUNKI.E 
WM. SCHNEIDER 


June 
May 
Jan. 
June 
Oct. 
May 
Aug. 


22, 18(51 
13, 1SC.2 
1, 1863 
22, 186! 
25, " 
13, 1862 
It, " 
21, " 
1, 1863 
22, istii 
25, " 
13, 1862 
It, " 
21, " 

26 ) " 
18, " 

26, 1861 

17, 1*62 

7. ISO;:; 

15, " 

2, 18C.5 

8, 1861 
10, 1862 

20, 1861 
2i, " 
1, " 


June 
July 
Jan . 
June 
Oct. 
July 
Oct. 
Jan. 

June 

Nov. 
July 
Oct. 
Jan. 

May 
Aug. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Juno 
May 

July 
May 

June 


22, ISlil 
0, 1S62 
20, 1SC.3 
22, 181)1 

"(), isr.2 

4, " 
17, lSf.3 
2C., " 
22, 1SC.1 
1, " 
9, 18fi2 
4, " 
17, 1SC.3 

11 ISC, 2 
13. 18C.3 
2ti, l.Slil 
10, 18C.3 
7, " 
15, " 
2, 18C>5 
2(1, 18C.I 
10, 181)1 
20, 18C.1 
20, " 
"l", " 


Appointed Brig. Gen. of Vols. May 13, 1862. 
Killed at Stone River December 31, 18(32. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned. 
Promoted to Colonel May 13, 1802. 
Appointed Colonel 45th 0. V. I. Aug. 14, 1862. 
Resigned December 24. 1802. 
Promoted to Colonel January 1, 1863. 
Killed September 19, lSfi.3. 
romoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Oct. 25, ISfil. 
romoted to Lieutenant-Colonel May 13, 1862. 
Canceled, 
romoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Dec. 24, 18C.2. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Jan. 1, 18i>2. 

Appointed Surgeon of Volunteers April 1,1863. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned September 17, 1862. 
Resigned April 1, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
R -.signed March 30, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned March 12, 1862. 
Resigned January 30, 1862. 
Promoted to Major October 25, 1361. 


Do 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Burgeon 
Do. . 


DWIOHT JMIVIS Ju 


Dec. 
Jan. 
June 
Oct. 
31 ay 

All!?. 

Dec. 
Jan. 
June 
May 

All2T. 

Sept. 
Jan. 
Juno 
May 
July 

May 
June 


KLKAXAN M. MAST 
JOSKPH G. HAWKINS 

BEX.!. P. RUXKI.E 

THOMAS K. ROKERTS 
DWHJHT JAKVIS, JR 
KLKANAN M. MAST 
JOSKPH T. SNYDER 
SAMUEL I). TURKEY 


Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Do. , 
Captain 
Do. , 
Do 
Do 


E. Y. CHASE 
J W SMITH 


JAMES MC-CKEADY 
JOHN K. MOOKE 


S. M. SEEDS 


ANTHONY W. SMITH 
THOMAS B. VAN HOUN 
A. F. Beach 
Francis S. Parker 
Benj. P. Runkle 


Do. , 
Do. 
Do 


Horatio S. Cosgrove 
Win. Schneider" . . 


6, " 


" ( .] " 


Mustered out. 
Promoted to Maior Auiust 14, 1862. 
Resigned September 15, 1861. 


James McGarr 


10, 


" 10, " 


Do. , 
Dt). 
Do. , 
Do. 
Do 
Do. , 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


John Castell 
Thomas It. Roberts 
Dwight Jarvis, jr 
Klkanan M. Mast 


Oct. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Keb 


13, 
21, 
2">, 

9J 1862 


Oct. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Keb. 

Manb 
May 
July 

Oct. 

Feb. 

April 
May 


13, " 
21, " 
25, " 
8, " 
9, 1852 
5, " 
10, li 
20, " 
1, " 
0, 
4. " 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
11, 18C>3 
11, || 

18, " 
1<, " 


Resigned February 3, 1S62. 
Promoted to Major 3Iay 13. 62; re d J y 30, V,2. 
Promoted to Major August 14, 1862. 
Promoted to Major December 24, 1862. 
Resigned November 28, 1862. 
K.-si .rned Julv 2<, 18C.2. 
Mustered out September 10, 1862. 
Promoted to Major June 1, 1863. . 
levoked ; no vacancy. 
Appointed Captain and C. S. 
Mustered out. 
Honorably discharged February 12, 1SC4. 
Resigned. 
Drowned, in 1863. 
romoti-d bv President May 0, 1863. 
Died January 10, 1863. 
Honorably discharged September 3, 18. 
Killed September 10, 1863. 
Resigned September 10, 1864. 
Died of wounds May 28, 1864. 


James B Donv 


Ransun U. Hen.l..:rson 
Joseph T. Snider 
James (). Sionage 
James U. Stonage 


March 
May 
July 

Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 

May 


10, " 
12, " 
3d, " 
13, || 

2S " 
11, " 

M, " 

i, 18C.3 

25, 1SC.2 
1, " 
1, " 
10, " 
6, " 


Do. 




DO. : 

Do 


J-pthiti 11. Powell 


Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do ! 

fc ::::::::: 


Frank J. Jones. 


John Murpliv J 
Samuel C.CoH 
rhomiis F. Munlock 
John K. !lay 
Saumul W. McCullocli 



92 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


.IATI: ( 


1 i: A N K . 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. * 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

ifc 
BS: 
ft 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

ft: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Thomas B. George 
Wm B Lambert 


Sept. 

Nov. 
Feb. 
May 
Oct. 

May 

June 

Aug. 
Oct. 


30, 1864 

30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
3. " 
10, 1805 
31, " 
25, 
29, 1861 
29, " 
1, || 

6, " 
HI, 
12, 
13, | 

26) 


Sept. 30, lxi-4 
30, 
" 30, " 
" 30, " 
Nov. 3, " 
Feb. 10, 1865 
Mav 31, " 
Oct. 25, " 
May 29, 1801 
" 29, 
June 1, || 

" Ifl) " 

" 12, " 
" 13, " 
21, " 
" 22 " 
Aug. 29) " 
Oct. 26, " 


Resigned September 29, 1864, as 1st Lieut. 
Mustered out August 26, 1865. 
Honorably discharged January 26, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned Mav 17, 1865. 
Dismissed August 15, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Captain October 25, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain February 5, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain November 8, 1801. 
Promoted to Captain January 9, 1862. 
Resigned January 13, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain March 12, 1862. 
Resigned January 3, 1862. 
Resigned October 15, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain May 13, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain Mav 31, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain February 19, 1862. 
Declined. 
Died October 18, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain August 14, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain August 14, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain July 28, 1862. 
Died Januarv 8, 1863. 
Honorably discharged September 11, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain January 1, 18G3. 


Robert K. Seig 
James Thompson 


James H. Scott 
John P. Millet 
James H. Merrill 
Erastus C. Hawkins ;.... 
Dwight Jarvis, jr 
James B. Pom.. 
Elkanan 31. Mast 
James D. Smith 
George II Guild . . . 


losepli T. Smder 
Tames D. Stover 
John Conwell 
Tames O. Stonage 
John Seibert ". 
Ueasou R. Henderson 
Tohn A. Hunter 
I \ L d/ure 


Tepthia 11 Powell 


Nov. 


8, || 

9, 1862 
9, " 

ftj " 
1ft) " 


Nov. 8, " 
8, " 
9, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 
" 9, " 
21, " 


Thomas J. London 
Thomas L. Carnahan 
Tohn Murphv 
Tohn Conwell 


J a n . 

Feb. 
March 


Krank J. Jones 


lames W. McConnell 
Wm. Rains 
Thomas F. Murdock 


19, " 
March 20, " 
April 10, " 


Resigned Si arch 15, 1862. 
Resigned May 10, 1X62. 
Promoted January 1, 1863. 


Thomas B. George 
lludolph lie Steigncr 
Nathan W. Daniels 
Thomas B. George 
Samuel S. Gold 


May 


30, " 
14, " 
10, " 
13, " 
31, " 


May 1, " 

|| 14, || 

July ") " 
Oct. 4, " 


Revoked. 
Resigned December 8, 1862. 
Mustered out Julv 13, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain January 1, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain 
Resigned January 19, 1864. 
M ustered out. 
Promoted to Captain 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Honorably discharged November 7, 1863. 
Resigned February 8, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned April 15, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned June 18, 186ft. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Resigned September 6, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant November 8, 1861. 
Resigned Januarys, 1862. 
Resigned September 24, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant U. S. A. 
Resigned September 24, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 9, 1862. 


\rus S. Bates 
hades Lindenberg 
Win. B. Lambert 
>*. W. McCulloch 
Robert K. Seig 
Thomas J. Stone 
Joseph Coe 
Samuel C. Bosler 
FrankBryer 
Samuel E. Henderson 
Andrew Smith 
Richard B. Crawford 
Tames 11. Scott 
Tohn P. Millet 
Tames H. Merrill 
Erastus C. Hawkins 
lames C. Armstrong 
Henry S. Leister...... 
lohn G. Clifford 
Henrv Netchev. . 


Aug. 

Dec. 
July 

Sept. 

Jan. 

March 
Jan. 

July 

Sept. 

Feb. 
May 

Dec . 
May 
Juno 


14, " 
14, " 
8, " 
13, " 
11, " 
1, 1863 

l) " 

1, " 
111, || 

SO, 1864 
30. " 
30, " 
30, " 
10, 1805 
10, " 
31, " 
25, " 
5, " 
29, 1X01 
1, " 
ft, 

10) 


Dec. 30) " 
30, 
" 30, 
" 30, 
" 30, 
April 9, 1 63 
May IS, 
IX, 
" 18, 
18, 
" 18, 
Sept. 3. 
" 30, 1861 
" 30, " 
" 30, " 
30, " 
Feb. 10, 186ft 
10, " 
May 31, " 
Oct. 25, " 
Dec. ft, " 
May 29, 1861 
June 1, " 
5, || 

" 10) " 


M. Sus-sman 


Joseph 11. Powell 
Charles P. Cavis 
Tohn Dauhwuth 


Howard S. Woodrow 


Tohn Murphv 


14) | 


" 14, " 


Wm. Rains. ... 


Inly 
Oct. 


22, | 

10) " 

3, " 


28) " 
Aug. 26, " 
Oct. 10, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 21, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant February ft, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 1ft, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant May 13, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant May 31, 1X62. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant July 28, 1862. 
Resigned M-arch 22, 1X62. 
Promoted to 1st Lieirtenant July 13, 1862. 
Canceled. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant August 14, 1862. 


Frank J Jones 


Tames W. McConnell 
David P. Doherty 




NOT 


25, " 
8, " 
27, " 
9, 1862 
9, " 
9, || 


" 2ft) " 
Nov. S, " 
" 27, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 
" 9, " 
9, || 


Samuel S. Gold.. 


John E.Ray 
Henry II. Kendrick 
S. W. McCulloch 


Jan. 

Feb. 


M. Sussman 
Cyrus S. Bates 


Robert K. Seis 
Wm. B. Lambert 
Joseph Coe 
J. K. Guthrie 
Win. 11. Campbell 
Thomas J. Stone 
John Fox 


March 

May 

July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Dec. 

Nov. 
Dec. 

Jan. 
Feb. 
Jan. 

March 
Jan. 


12) " 
15, || 

so) 

13, " 
31, " 
28, " 
12, " 
11, " 
8, " 
1. " 
20, " 
31, " 
1, " 
11, " 
1, 
1, 
I, 
1, 
1, 


March 31 ) " 
April 10, " 
10, " 

" 10, " 
May 1, " 
July 9, " 
Oct. 4, 

" 24) 
Dec. 30, 
" 30, 
Jan. 12, 1863 
March 13, " 
May 18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
IX, " 
18, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant September 11, 62. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Decembers, 1862. 
Promoted to Int Lieutenant January 1, 1863. 
Resigned December 20, 1862. 
Revoked; no vacancy. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 1. 1863. 
Killed at Stone River December 31, 1863. 
Killed at Stone River December 31, 1863. 
Resigned February 11, 1X63. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 1, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 1, 1X63. 
Discharg-d on account of wounds. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 1, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out. 
Clustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned February 1ft, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned Mav 29, 1864. 


James C. Wiiaker 
Kit-hard E.( rawford 


Frank Brver 


Frank Gcisrer 


Samuel E. Henderson 
James Thompson 
Robert F. Wolfkill 
Win. A. Short 
George 11. jiorman 
Emerv Mali ne 


Frank lieiger 


James S. ( askev 


Daniel M. Rutern 
Franklin Blarkniini 



THIRTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. j;j 



THIRTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE THIRTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY was organized at 
Camp Jackson, Columbus, about the 20th of Apr:!, 1861, under the command of W. S. 
Smith, an experienced officer of the regular army, as Colonel; C. B. Mason, Lieutenant- 
Colonel, and J. G. Hawkins, Major. Thursday, May 9th, it moved to Camp Dennison, where it 
was disciplined, drilled, and prepared for the arduous struggle in which it was to participate. 

On the 30th of June the regiment left Camp Dennison, and embarked on the Ohio River for 
Western Virginia, to re-enforce the column of General McClellan, then operating in that region. 
On Monday, July 1st, it reached Parkersburg, Virginia, numbering one thousand men, rank and 
file. On the 14th it left Paikcrsburg by the Parkersburg Branch Railroad for Oakland, on the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. From thence it marched to Greenland Gap, in pursuit of a Rebel 
force, said to be intrenched at that place. Finding no enemy, it retraced its steps to Oakland. 
From thence to Clarksburg, and through obstructed roads to the town of Sutton, on Elk River, in 
a valley surrounded on all sides with large hills. The Thirteenth, in company with the National 
forces to the number of five thousand infantry and artillery, encamped on these hills, the artillery 
commanding all approaches to the town Frequent scouts were made into the surrounding coun 
try, but nothing of importance transpired. 

On the 10th of September Colonel Siniih led his regiment in the battle of Carnifex Ferry, 
occupying the extreme left, and made a good record for the command. From this date until 
November 6th, the regiment was encamped at Gauley Bridge, having frequent skirmishes with 
the enemy. 

On the 6th of November, Benham s brigade, composed of the Tenth, Twelfth, and Thirteenth 
Ohio regiments, crossed the Kanawha and went into camp at Loup Creek. McMullen s battery 
having joined the brigade on the 12th, the combined force set out in pursuit of General Floyd. The 
Thirteenth Ohio held the post of honor, and was preceded by company A as skirmishers. The 
first brush occurred at Cotton Hill, in which the regiment lost one killed and two wounded. 
Floyd made good his retreat to Lewisburg, and the National troops halted at Fayetteville. The 
Rebels having been driven from West Virginia, the principal portion of the troops were withdrawn 
from that section, and transferred by transports down the Ohio River to Jeffersonville, Indiana, 
the Thirteenth going into camp near that place, opposite Louisville. On the llth of December it 
received orders to join the column under Buell, then about to resume his chase after Bragg a 
Rebel army. On the 13th the regiment went into camp near Elizabethtown, Kentucky, and 
remained there until the 26th, when, with the rest of the forces, it moved to Bacon Creek. Here 
the most rigid drill was instituted, giving confidence to the men and to the regiment as an 
organization. 

On the 10th of February, 1862, the regiment received orders to march, and entered Bowling 
Green on the evening of the 15th of February, to find it evacuated. On the 22d the regiment took 
cars on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, forming the advance of Bucll s army on Nashville, 
and reached Gallatin, forty miles from Nashville, where, under the superintendence of Colonel 
Scott, Assistant-Seer etarv of AVnr, an important bridge pver the Cumberland, damaged by the 



94 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

enemy in their retreat, was repaired. Reaching Nashville on the 26th, the Thirteenth crossed 
the Cumberland on the steamer "Lady Jackson," marched through the city, and encamped two 
miles beyond. 

On the 1st of March the Seventeenth Brigade advanced on Lavergne, on the Murfreesboro 
Pike, in support of a detachment of National troops that had been attacked by the enemy. The 
enemy retreated, and the Thirteenth returned to its camp. Tuesday, March 10th, the regiment 
was detached from Mitchel s division and ordered to report to General Crittenden. On the 19th 
companies A and G were detached from the regiment to assist the First Michigan to repair 
bridges on the Alabama and Tennessee Rivers, and on the 2d of April the remainder of the 
regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Hawkins, joined the column on the march to 
re-enforce General Grant, then in anticipation of an attack from the Rebels on Pittsburg Landing. 
The regiment, after a terrible march, endured in common with the other troops, reached the town 
of Savannah, on the Tennessee River, on the morning of the 6th of April. It was at once 
forwarded to the battle-field, and with the Fifth Division, formed on the right of Nelson s com 
mand. About eight o clock the division moved forward to meet the foe. It soon came upon the 
enemy in position, supported by the famous Washington Battery, of New Orleans. The Thir 
teenth Ohio, burning to avenge their fallen comrades of the day before, sprang for this battery, 
and after a desperate struggle, captured it entire, but only to lose it, as the enemy in larger 
numbers made a charge and retook their pieces. In this affair the Major, Ben. Piatt Runkle, 
fell, severely wounded, and was reported dead. 

About one o clock, when the last grand advance of the National army was made, another 
attempt was made by the Thirteenth to capture the Washington (Rebel) Batten-. It was suc 
cessful, and the famed guns were once more the trophies of the regiment. The enemy, foiled in 
his attempt to sweep the National forces into the Tennessee, retreated, and on the 29th the Thir 
teenth Ohio, complete once more, joined in the advance on Corinth. The regiment reached the 
vicinity of Corinth about the 12th of May, where it performed its share on the picket-line and 
the various affairs with the enemy, until the evacuation of the city on the 31st of May. 

The Fourteenth Division, on the morning of 4th June, started with the army of Buell on its 
advance against Chattanooga. On the 5th it crossed the Tuscumbia River, the Thirteenth Ohio 
camping at Danville. On the 24th the regiment crossed the Tennessee to Florence, Alabama, 
and encamped on the right of the Twenty-Fifth, at Shallow Creek, seven miles from the city. On 
Monday, July 1st, Huntsville, Alabama, was reached, after an excessively fatiguing march. On 
the 9th it was detached from the division to perform guard duty on the Chattanooga Railroad. 
It, however, joined the division at Stevenson a few days thereafter, and on the 16th went into 
camp at that well-known spot, " Battle Creek," familiar to the memory of every soldier of the old 
organization of the Army of the Ohio. Here they remained until the 21st day of August. 
During a considerable portion of their sojourn at Battle Creek the troops, from the scarcity of 
provisions, were placed on half-rations. 

On August 20th orders were received to march. Bragg had left Chattanooga, and was well 
on his way to Louisville, Kentucky, with designs on Indiana and Ohio. Then commenced a 
march that has made the Army of the Ohio a record as enduring as time. From the 21st of 
August until the 26th of September, a period of thirty-six days, the National soldiers patiently 
toiled on after their exultant enemy, enduring the hot rays of the sun, almost unbearable thirst, 
half-rations, and the stifling dust. What soldier of the Thirteenth Ohio will ever forget this 
terrible march? On the 26th the troops reached Louisville, having outmarched and passed, on 
a parallel road, the Rebel army. After a rest until the 1st of October, the pursuit of Bragg was 
resumed. 

On the 8th of October the right wing, under Rousseau and McCook, encountered the enemy 
at Perryville, and attacked without orders and before the commanding General s preparations 
were complete. The Thirteenth Ohio, in Crittenden s division, on the right, as well as the other 
troops in that organization, were not actively engaged. Having repulsed the attack the enemy 
continued his retreat, and Crittenden s division pursued as far as Mount Vernon, when they halted 



THIRTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 95 

and rejoined the main column. In this pursuit the regiment penetrated the country watered by 
the Big Rockcastle River, called by some, "Wild Cat Country," one of the wildest and most 
mountainous localities in Kentucky. 

On the 30th of October General Buell was relieved, and General William S. Rosecrans 
assigned to the command of the Army of the Ohio. The National troops immediately pushed in 
pursuit of the enemy, and on Wednesday, the 5th of November, the tents of the Thirteenth Ohio 
were pitched near Glasgow, Kentucky, having, by forced marches from Mount Vernon, Kentucky, 
accomplished the distance in twelve days. From this point to within half a mile of Nashville, 
nothing of great moment occurred, although the regiment was almost continually under arms to 
repel skirmishers. 

On Tuesday, December 2d, the Fifth Division, consisting of three brigades, General Van 
Cleve commanding, was reviewed by General Rosecrans, who paid a high compliment to the 
soldierly appearance of the Thirteenth Ohio, reminding them at the same time that he had a 
lively remembrance of their services in Western Virginia. 

Picket duty and foraging, interspersed with an occasional skirmish, were the daily occupa 
tions of the regiment until the advance on Murfreesboro , December 26, 1862. In one of the 
skirmishes near Lavergne, with Wheeler s cavalry, after a severe fight, the Thirteenth lost two 
men killed and several wounded, and Lieutenant Bates, cf company B, captured. 

Crittenden s division (in which was the Thirteenth Ohio) held the left wing, Thomas the 
center, and McCook the right. The grand advance commenced on the morning of the 26th. The 
Thirteenth Ohio moved with Crittenden s column out on the Nashville and Murfreesboro Pike 
toward Lavergne. The enemy slowly fell back, fighting as they retreated. On the morning of 
the 27th Lavergne was shelled, and the rebels immediately evacuated the place. By order 
of General Rosecrans, the next day (being Sunday) was observed as a day of rest. On the 29th 
the advance was sounded and the entire line moved forward, and, after some fighting, reached 
Stone River in the evening. McCook s column met with more resistance, and did not get up 
until Jhe next day at noon. 

On the morning of Wednesday, December 31st, the Thirteenth Ohio, under Colonel Jos. G. 
Hawkins, was ordered in from outpost duty, and took position in line with their brigade, (the 
Fourteenth), constituting the Second Brigade of the Fifth Division, composed of the Forty- 
Fourth and Eighty-Sixth Indiana, Fifty-Ninth and Thirteenth Ohio, and the Third Wisconsin 
Battery, under command of Colonel F. P. Fyffe. Receiving orders to cross Stone River and 
threaten the enemy, the regiment, with the division of Van Cleve, had commenced the advance 
when the orders were countermanded. The right wing, under McCook, had been driven back, 
and the center was in danger. The Thirteenth Ohio was at once counter-marched and "double- 
quicked " back to the Murfreesboro Pike, where it assisted in the rescue of a train that was about 
being captured by the enemy s cavalry. About ten o clock the brigade received orders to form on 
the right of the First Brigade, with Colonel Hawkins s brigade on its right, (the Second Brigade s 
right), and advanced down the slope of the Cedar Ridge and across an open field toward the 
enemy, in the wood beyond. In this advance the Thirteenth Ohio occupied the left of 
the second line, covering the Thirty-Ninth Ohio, and having the Eighty-Sixth Ohio on its 
right. Some disorder occurred in the line from the density of the woods on the slope, but on 
emerging into the open field, the line was "dressed" and advanced regularly across the field. 
The front line, consisting of the Fifty-Ninth Ohio and Forty-Fourth Indiana, pushed rapidly 
forward and entered the woods. The Thirteenth Ohio and Eighty-Sixth Indiana were sheltered 
behind a fence, adjac.ent to the woods in front, in readiness to support the front line. In a few 
moments the front line was desperately attacked and driven back over the second line. The 
Thirteenth Ohio immediately opened on the enemy, and held them in check until it became 
evident that it was outflanked. At this time Colonel Hawkins was killed, and with him others 
of the regiment. The command devolved upon Major Dwight Jarvis. The regiment continued 
fighting the enemy until they had passed around both flanks, when Major Jarvis, after repeated 
commands and expostulations, induced the men to fall back ; but in doing so they became some- 



96 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

* 

what disordered, and suffered sadly from a Rebel battery, which played upon them in their retreat. 
Reaching the line of reserves on the border of the woods, the regiment halted, re-formed, and 
turned on the enemy, driving them back with considerable loss. In this brief struggle of an 
hour s duration, the Thirteenth Ohio lost one hundred and forty-two officers and men in killed, 
wounded, and missing. The day following, January 1, 1863, the Thirteenth did not participate in 
any important movement. January 2d the regiment was on the extreme left of the National 
lines, on the south bank of Stone River. At three P. M. the Rebels, in three lines of battle, 
charged the National position, compelling the Thirteenth, with others, to fall back under cover 
of the artillery on the north bank. The enemy still pushed forward, when thirty-six pieces of 
National artillery opened with canister and grape, literally mowing down the Rebels, and com 
pelling their instant and speedy retreat from the field. The Thirteenth bivouacked on the north 
bank of the river that night. The morning of the 3d found Murfreesboro evacuated, and the 
enemy in full retreat. The loss of the regiment in this series of battles was thirty-one killed, 
eighty-five wounded, and sixty-nine missing total, one hundred and eighty-five. 

The regiment did not participate in any movement or engagement of special moment during 
the long sojourn of the "Army of the Cumberland" at Murfreesboro . On June 24, 1863, the 
bugles sounded the advance Southward, and on the 27th of the same month the regiment once 
more joined the marching column. About August 1st it reached and occupied McMinnville. 
Rosecrans s movements threatening the envelopment of Bragg, the latter General rapidly retreated 
from Tullahoma, falling back on Chattanooga. On the morning of the 16th of August, with the 
entire corps under Crittenden, the organization pushed forward by the Pikeville route. This 
movement seriously threatening one of the flanks of Bragg s forces, that General again retreated, 
completely uncovering Chattanooga. On the 9th of September the Thirteenth, with drums beat 
ing and banners flying, marched through this celebrated city of imaginary impregnability, and 
encamped for the night at Rossville, five miles south of Chattanooga. 

When the concentration of the army began, previous to the battle of Chickamauga, the 
Thirteenth, with the remaining troops of Van Cleve s division, took post on the southern spur 
of Missionary Ridge. On the morning of the 19th of September the battle of Chickamauga 
opened, and through all the varying fortunes of that and the succeeding day, the Thirteenth 
preserved unsullied its record, made sacred at Stone River. 

The regiment, during this series of battles, was commanded by its Lieutenant-Colonel, the 
Colonel (Dwight Jarvis) being absent on duty at McMinnville. Colonel Jarvis rejoined the regi 
ment shortly afterward. The Lieutenant-Colonel was killed, and the Major severely wounded, 
and the skeleton ranks, after the battle of Chattanooga, attested the heavy and mournful loss 
of rank and file. 

The National army fell back into the fortifications at Chattanooga. On the 22d the regiment 
had a severe skirmish with the enemy on Missionary Ridge, which continued during the entire 
forenoon of that day. In the afternoon it withdrew from its position to its former place in the 
intrenchments of Chattanooga. Here it remained until November 23d, when it again moved. 
General Thomas now commanded the three old corps of the Army of the Cumberland. General 
Grant directed the onward movement, and the preliminaries toward the expulsion of Bragg from 
Missionary Ridge were at once commenced. History has already recorded the successful charge 
that swept the Rebel host down the mountain, across the valley, and converted its retreat into a 
shameful rout. In this charge the Thirteenth bore itself bravely, and, it is claimed, was the first 
to plant its colors on the Rebel works, and Sergeant Daniel Bitter, of company A, was the first 
man of the regiment to scale and enter the fortifications. The losses of the regiment in this affair 
were severe. On the 28th of November the Thirteenth Ohio, with the Third Division, and 
another division of the Fourth Corps, to which it had been attached since the reorganization at 
Chattanooga, advanced to the rescue of Knoxville, then besieged by Longstreet. Upon the 
approach of the National forces, the enemy retreated, and was pursued as far as Blain s Cross 
Roads, and Four Corners, near Clinch Mountain. The regiment during these marches suffered 
severely for the want of shoes and clothing, as well as rations. For a great portion of the time it 



THIRTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 97 

was compelled to subsist oft the country through which it marched. From Blain s Cross-Roads it 
advanced in pursuit of the enemy to Strawberry Plains, crossed the Holston River and marched 
to Dandridge, twenty-three miles from the North Carolina line. Here it encountered the enemy, 
and sharp skirmishing ensued, but no general engagement, the Rebels rapidly getting out of the 
way of the progressive Yankees. Upon the retreat of the enemy the National forces returned 
over the most horrible roads and through weather of almost incessant snow and rain to the Plains 
and from thence to Knoxville. 

Leave of absence was now granted the regiment to enable it to return to Chattanooga, settle 
its affairs and visit their homes in Ohio ; thirty days being granted for that purpose, in considera 
tion of their having enlisted as veterans. The remainder of the regiment those who did not re- 
enlist were transferred to the Fifty-Ninth Ohio, of the same brigade, division and corps to 
which the original Thirteenth had been attached. The Fifty-Ninth was at this time (January 28, 
1864) stationed at Marysville, sixteen miles south-west of Knoxville. At this date, after thirty- 
four months of marching and fighting, closes the first term of service of the Thirteenth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. 

On the 5th of January, 1864, three-fourths of the members of the Thirteenth Ohio re-enlisted 
for another term of three years service. Their muster was, however, delayed until the 10th of 
February. The commissioned officers were Colonel Dwight Jarvis, Captain McCulloch, and 
Lieutenants Bosler, Henderson, Crawford, Rutern, and George. 

The veterans reached Columbus, Ohio, on the 25th of February, were furloughed to their 
homes, and at the end of thirty days promptly reported for duty at Carnp Chase, near Columbus, 
and returned in a body to Chattanooga. At that place they found that the non-veterans of the 
regiment had been attached to the Eighty-Sixth Indiana Infantry, on duty at Cleveland, Ten 
nessee. The march was resumed, and in due time the regiment was reunited. From this time 
until June 21, 1864, when the term of the original organization expired, the veteran and the non- 
veteran served amicably and efficiently together, both organizations being consolidated into one, 
and both, therefore, sharing the same dangers and the same glory. The regiment was attached to 
the Third Brigade (General John S. Beatty), Third Division (General T. J. Wood), and Fourth 
Corps (Major-General Howard). The Fourth Corps, with the Fourteenth and Twentieth, consti 
tuted the Army of the Cumberland, under the command of Major-General Geo. II. Thomas. 

On the 1st day of May, 1864, the troops received orders to prepare for the Atlanta campaign, 
and on the 3d struck tents and advanced against Ringgold, Georgia, which place was occupied 
without resistance on the 5th. It was ascertained that the enemy in strong force, under General 
Joe Johnston, held the line between Dalton and Resaca, showing a disposition to dispute the 
further progress of the National army. 

The Thirteenth Ohio went into camp at Catoosa Springs, near Ringgold, and on the 7th of 
May, after some night skirmishing with the enemy s rear-guard, in which the whole command 
was engaged, reached and occupied Tunnel Hill. From this point the regiment, with the remain 
ing troops of the corps, pushed forward as near to the top of Rocky Face Ridge as it was possible 
for troops to go, when the enemy, fearing one of Sherman s flank movements, evacuated their 
position and fell back toward Resaca. Had General Johnston defended this position with any 
thing like the pertinacity displayed a few days thereafter, the graves of National soldiers would 
have been more numerous on Rocky Face Ridge than they are to-day. 

On the 10th the Fourth Corps relieved the entire front, while the rest of the army, viz.: the 
Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-Third Corps, went toward 
Resaca. Incessant skirmishing followed until the night of the 12th, when the enemy retreated 
from Dalton, which was occupied by the National forces on the 13th. The Thirteenth passed 
through the town and beyond in pursuit of the enemy, who, on the 14th, after some hard skir 
mishing, were driven into the fortifications around Resaca. In all these encounters the regiment 
performed important services, as is shown from the loss of the division. On the 14th its loss was 
seventy-one killed and three hundred and eighty-four wounded, including General Willich, com 
manding the Second Brigade, who fell badly wounded while leading his troops in a charge. 

YOL. II. 7. 



98 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

At Resaca, on the 14th, the Fourth Corps formed a junction with the balance of the army 
and relieved the Twentieth and Twenty-First Army Corps, which passed on to the left to coun 
teract an attempted flank movement of the enemy. On the 15th General Hooker fought the 
enemy at Resaca ; but as the Thirteenth Ohio formed part of the reserve, it was not engaged on 
that day. That night Johnson retreated and fell back on Calhoun, on the south bank of the Ooste- 
naula River ; but on the advance of the victorious legions of Sherman he again retreated, retir 
ing slowly in the direction of Atlanta. Skirmishing was the order of the day, and the Thir 
teenth performed its full share, and many a Rebel fell under its rifles. 

Passing Cassville and Adairsville on the 25th, the Rebel commander determined that 
Atlanta should be fairly lost, if lost at all, and so drew up his forces around Lost Mountain ; and 
here occurred the battle of that name. On the 27th of May the Third Division, Fourth Corps, 
passed around the left to strike the enemy s flank, marching about eight miles, supposing the 
extremity of the Rebel line had been reached and passed. But a sad mistake was made. In 
stead of striking the enemy on the flank, the Third Division had struck the Rebel center, and 
encountered breastworks gray with men and bristling with artillery. The division was advancing 
in three lines of battle through a dense forest, and the first intimation it had of its position was a 
terrific discharge from the enemy s works, but a few yards in advance. The first line was 
destroyed under the withering fire. The second line, of which the Thirteenth formed a part, im 
mediately advanced on the double-quick, and with a yell and a volley rushed up to the works. 
The fire became very warm, but the second line maintained their ground steadily and returned 
the volleys with interest. From four P. M. until nine at night the efforts of the National forces 
to take the position were unavailing. The ammunition of the Thirteenth became exhausted. 
McCulloch was struck by a ball going in at one cheek and out at the other. Thompson had 
his right arm shattered, and the killed and wounded were lying thickly around. The Major of 
the Thirteenth (J. T. Snyder), then in command, still rallied the remnant; hearing the men call 
ing for more ammunition, and knowing that unless it was procured his men would be compelled 
to retreat, with his own hands took from the boxes of the killed and wounded their remaining 
cartridges and distributed them among the regiment. 

General Thomas observing that no impression could be made ou the enemy s line, ordered a 
withdrawal of the forces, which was effected in good order. The Third Division went into the 
action with four thousand one hundred men and came out at nine that night with barely twenty- 
five hundred. The loss of the regiment was about fifty killed, wounded, and prisoners. 

On the 9th of June the regiment went into camp near Acworth, skirmishing almost all the 
way with the retreating enemy. 

The term of enlistment of the non-veterans of the Thirteenth (officers and men) having ex 
pired on the 21st, General Howard issued orders for their transportation to Chattanooga, at 
which point they were to be paid and discharged. Simultaneously with this order came another, 
that the veteran Thirteenth should be transferred to the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
This order created considerable feeling in the regiment, and on proper representation to General 
Thomas it was revoked, and the old and endeared name of " Thirteenth " retained. An order was 
then issued consolidating the veterans into a battalion of four companies, to be called the Thir 
teenth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry Battalion, under the command of Major J. T. Snyder. 
Five enlisted men were breveted as Lieutenants and placed in command of companies until the 
commissions were received from the Governor of Ohio. Companies A and F were by this con 
solidation merged into one company, called company A ; B, K, and G formed company B ; D, I, 
and C, company C, and H and E, company E. John H. Scott commanded company A, John P. 
Millet company B, James II. Merrill company C, Erastus C. Hawkins company D. 

The entire battalion numbered one hundred and twenty men present for duty, and eighty 
men on extra and daily duty, and sick in hospital. The battalion had the same position in the 
brigade as before the change. 

On the 10th of June the Thirteenth Battalion joined the advance toward the rugged slopes 



THIRTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 99 

of Kenesaw, but did not participate in any of the engagements until Kenesaw was reached. 
General Thomas pushed his forces as far up those terrible heights as it was possible for men to go 
in the face of such a fire, but all in vain ; he was compelled to fall back. The loss of the bat 
talion in the struggle was Shildecker, Muncaster, Gregory, and Miller, of company D, killed; 
Alexander, of company D, and Wm. H. Clay, of company A, wounded. 

The enemy evacuated Kenesaw on the night of the 29th, as General Sherman was again 
engaged in flanking their position. The battalion accompanied tbe corps in this flank move 
ment ; and when Sherman commenced to draw his lines gradually around the doomed city of At 
lanta the battalion was stationed in close proximity to the Rebel lines, busily engaged in throwing 
up intrenchments preparatory to the siege of the place. Shot and shell day and night came 
plunging through their camp. Miller, of company C, was killed by a piece of shell, and Brown, 
of company A, severely wounded in the head by a Minie ball. 

On the 29th of August General Sherman commenced another flanking movement from the 
front of Atlanta, passing to its south side. The movement commenced about ten o clock at night. 
The battalion was thrown out on picket to protect the brigade while in the process of withdraw 
ing. To prevent the enemy from discovering the movement at this point of the line, the battalion 
opened a heavy fire on the Rebels, which was kept up until three o clock in the morning, when 
they began to retire. The enemy, discovering their retreat, gave immediate pursuit, and a con 
tinuous skirmish was kept up. The battalion succeeded, however, in bringing off all their equip 
age, and misled the enemy to the full extent desired. 

This move necessarily compelled the Rebel General Hood to leave Atlanta to save his com 
munications, and advance southward to Jonesboro and Lovejoy s Station. At the latter place a 
desperate fight took place on the 2d of September, in which the Third Division participated ; and, 
after a fierce struggle, failed to drive the enemy from a strong position. The Thirteenth Bat 
talion lost, in killed, Ambrose Andeman, of company A; John Van Godon and George Thorn, 
of company D. Sergeant Busick, of company B, was wounded. Atlanta fell, and the victorious 
Sherman took up his quarters within its corporate limits. 

The division, to which what was left of the Thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry belonged, was 
not permitted to remain in Atlanta. It was ordered into camp six miles north of the city, on the 
battle-ground of the 22d of July, near the spot where the brave McPherson fell. This chance for 
rest was very grateful to the tired and worn-out troops, as it was the first regular camp enjoyed since 
the commencement of the campaign in May. Their restless and energetic Commander-in-Chief, 
General "W. T. Sherman, had taxed their energies to the very utmost, and had thereby accom 
plished the most brilliant results. The duty was light, the battalion only coming in for their 
share of duty every fifth day ; and in the same time half the battalion was detailed for forage duty. 

On the 4th of October the camp was struck, under orders to resume the march. It had been 
announced that the Rebel General Hood, becoming desperate at the continued defeats of the Confed 
erate forces, had turned at bay and was endeavoring, by quick and solid blows and rapid marching, 
to gain the rear of General Sherman s army and cut his communications with his base of supply. 
The National troops pushed forward as far as Acworth, on the Georgia Central Railroad, where 
the army divided, the Fourth and Twenty-Third Corps, under Thomas, continuing after Hood, 
while General Sherman, with the balance of the troops, halted and prepared for his memorable 
march to the sea. 

The Fourth and Twenty-Third Corps followed Hood into Tennessee, and at Pulaski suc 
ceeded in getting ahead of his forces. Nashville was the goal of both armies. The National 
forces must reach it in time to fortify, else the Confederate army would fight for its possession in 
the very streets of the city. It was an exciting and closely-contested race, but the National forces 
came out ahead, not, however, without an obstinate and sanguinary engagement at Franklin, Ten 
nessee. In this engagement the most desperate valor was displayed on both sides, but the sturdy 
endurance of the National soldiers triumphed, and the march for Nashville was resumed. 

In marching from Columbia the Third Division, of which the Thirteenth formed a portion, 
brought up the rear of the army. Schofield s corps was in the advance, who, with his division, 



100 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

reached Franklin at ten o clock A. M., and began at once to fortify. The hasty and frail defenses 
were almost completed when the advance of the Third Division reached the Harpeth River, and 
was immediately ordered into position above and below the town, along the stream, to prevent a 
flank movement. The Rebel army under Hood soon made an impetuous attack, and the fight 
was fairly opened. General Thomas was prepared. The enemy was received by a withering fire 
of well-posted artillery, which swept the plains on every side. Again and again did Hood pre 
cipitate his Rebel hosts on the National lines, but without signal success, until at nightfall he was 
compelled to withdraw his shattered columns. The struggle at Franklin being over, the National 
army was again put in rapid march for Nashville. The Thirteenth Battalion reached that city on 
the 3d of December and took position inside the defenses. The Rebel army was close at haijd. 
It appeared in front of the city on the 4th of December and commenced to fortify. From this 
date, until the battles of the 15th and 16th, the battalion was actively engaged in skirmishing and 
picket-firing along the lines. 

On the morning of the 15th of December General Thomas took the offensive and began his 
movements against the enemy. On the evening of the 14th the Third Division was ordered to be 
ready for action before daylight the next morning, to pass around the enemy s left, and when the 
advance in front was sounded, to vigorously attack. One regiment in each brigade was ordered to 
hold the line left by the brigade, and to keep up a continuous fire until the action began. The 
Thirteenth Battalion occupied the trenches vacated by its brigade, and was, therefore, not en 
gaged in the action of the 15th of December. On the morning of the 16th it left the defenses 
and joined the brigade in front before Hood s new line of works, thrown up by him during the 
previous night. About three o clock P. M., Steedman s negro brigade charged this part of the 
line, but were repulsed with heavy loss. The Second Brigade was then ordered up and made a 
charge, but they, too, were compelled to fall back. The Third Brigade was then ordered to pre 
pare for action. The men charged forward with great spirit. The Thirteenth Battalion was among 
the first troops over the Rebel works, aiding in the capture of a battery of four guns. The work 
of destruction was quick but desperate. The Confederate army was shattered, and immediately 
commenced a rapid retreat, the National army following, capturing large numbers of prisoners 
and much material of war. The retreat soon became a rout, and by the time the pursuing infantry 
reached the Tennessee all further attempts to reach them, except with cavalry, was entirely use 
less, as the Rebels were scattered widely over Southern Tennessee and Northern Alabama. 

The Thirteenth Battalion stopped at Huntsville, Alabama, and went into camp near that 
beautiful town, where it remained until the 1st of March, 1865. It was then ordered to East Ten 
nessee. While at Jonesboro , in April, the news of Lee s surrender was received. The battalion 
Avas thereafter ordered to Nashville, where it arrived on the 9th day of June, 1865. 

On the 16th of June all the troops composing the Fourth Corps were ordered to Texas. The 
route of the battalion was by cars to Johnsonville, thence by boats down the Cumberland and 
Ohio Rivers to Cairo, thence down the Mississippi to New Orleans, at which place it arrived 
on the 27th of June. It remained at New Orleans until the 7th of July, when it embarked for 
Indianola, Texas, reaching that place on the 10th. From this point the battalion marched to and 
occupied the village of Green Lake, a settlement about thirty miles from Matagorda Bay. The 
camp was on the open prairies, where the water was literally horrible and the surrounding coun 
try very unhealthy. Agues and fevers were prevalent, and the men suffered intensely. On the 
4th of September the battalion broke camp and marched to San Antonio, one hundred and fifteen 
miles further into the interior. This proved a most happy change. The place was healthy, the 
tiir salubrious, water excellent. The men soon began to recover from the miasmatic effects of 
their Green Lake residency. 

The battalion remained at San Antonio until December 5, 1865, at which date it was mus 
tered out of the United States service. It left San Antonio on the 6th of December, and on the 
17th of January reached Columbus, Ohio, where its arms and equipments were turned over to the 
proper authorities, the men were paid off and discharged and embarked for their several homes. 
Thus ended the service of this gallant and faithful regiment. 



FOURTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



101 



14th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



^lANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF IIANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


BEHAHKS. 




JAMES B STEEDMAN . 


April 


2, 1*61 
24, " 
24, " 


April 


24, 1861 
24, " 
24, " 


Killed at Laurel Hill. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Killed at Laurel Hill. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Lt. Colunol.... 
.Major 


GEOK<;E PEABODY ESTK 
PAUL EDWARDS 


nrgeon 
Ass t Surgeon 
Captain 


\V. C. DANIELS 
Seth B Moe 


April 


4, " 
25, " 
2.5, " 
24, " 


April 


4, " 
25, " 
2. r ), " 
24, " 


Louis Von Blessing 
Benj. N. Fisher...... 


Do. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Edwin D. Bradley 
Andivw Crawford 

John S. Snook 


May 

June 


24, " 
24, " 
24, " 
24, " 
24, " 

25, ;; 

25, " 


Juiie 
April 

Tune 
April 


24, " 
24. " 
24, " 
24, " 
24, " 
23, " 
9, " 
<t, " 
2,% " 
2.5, " 
24, 
24, 

24\ 
24, 
24, 
24, 
23, 4 
W, 
, " 

2;^ " 
1, " 
24, " 


E. L. Barber 
Caleb Dodd 


Geor<*e W Kirk 


Do 


Aniun C. Bradley 


Do 


Enoch B. Mann 


lnt Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2<1 Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Wilbur F. Stopford 
Jolm A. Chase 
Edwin J Evans. . 


April 

May 
April 


2. r ., " 

O^ 4i 

24 1 " 
24, " 
24, " 

24 " 
24, " 
2?,, " 
27, " 
2<>, " 
2"), 
27, " 
25, " 
25, | 




Aiuon C Bradley 


John D Belknap. ... 


\lfred Russell . 


Thomas M Ward 


Denis C Lalian 


John F Wallace 


David S. TalK i-dav 
Edwin D. Bradl-v 
Henry D. Kinsrsbur} 
George E. Welles 
Frank W. Marion 
Win. Shultz 
Edward M. Deuchar 


David S. Tallerday 


May 


24, 
21, 
24, 
24, 

24, 

: : 


July 


24, " 
24, " 

24, | 

23 " 
9, " 


John Crossen 


R A Franks 


James Man ton 


Samuel Sherman 
Orrin B. Doughton 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


JAMES B. STEEDMAN.... 


AuT. 


, 16, ISfil 


AlIEf. 


16, 1861 


Promoted to Brigadier-General July 17, IS62. 


Do . 


GEO. PEABODY ESTE 


July 


17, 18>2 


Nov 


20, 1862 


Mustered out Julv 7 186") 


Lt. Colonel.... 


GEOIUJE PEABODY ESTE 


A us. 


6, isc.l 


Jan. 


2\\ 1861 


Promoted to Colonel July 17, 1862. 


Do 


PAUL EDWARDS 


Julv 


17, 18i>2 


Vov 


20, 1862 


Resigned November 26, 1862. 


Do 


HENHY D. KINUSBURY 


Dec. 


27^ " 


Feb. 


ifi! " 


Mustered out November 8, 1864. 


Do 


ALBERT MOOKE 


Nov. 


IS, 1864 


Nov. 


18, 1864 i Mustered out. 


Maior 


PAUL EDWARDS 


Ausr. 


16, 1861 


Jan. 


21, 1861 1 Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 


Do 


HKNRY D. KINGBBURY 


July 


17, 1862 


Nov 


20 1862 Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 


Do 


JOHN W. AV ILSON 


Jan. 


20, 18615 


Feb. 


16, is-fi3 Died of wounds September 1, 1864. 


Surgeon 


W. C. DANIELS 


Aug. 




Aug. 


16, 1861 Uefiitrned November 7, 1862. 


Do 


GEORGE E. SLOATE 


Nov. 


7, 1862 


Dec. 


17, 1862 Pvsignrd Novembers, 1864. 


Do 


E. KING NASH 


44 


10, 1864 


Nov. 


10, 1864 Mustered out. 


A.Bs t Surgeon 


GEOKCE E. SLOATE 


Sept. 


51, 1861 


Ian. 


21, l.sf)2 Promoted to Surseon. 


Do. 


CHARLES E. AMES 


Dec. 


30, 1862 


Dec. 


31, " 


Piomoted to Surgeon. 


Do. 


CHARLES M. EATON 


Aug. 


21, " 


Feb. 


10, 863; Resigned March 4, I8(>3. 


Do. 


E. KIN NASH 


April 


10, ISfi.", 


April 


10, " Promoted to Surgeon. 


Do. 


THOMAS J. CROUSE 


July 


30, 1864 


July 


30, 1864! 


Chaplain 


li. ii. AiAiTlwVSl KKUEH. 


Sept. 


17, 1861 


Sopt. 


18, 1861 


Resigned February 14, 1863. 


Do 


HORATIO L. SARGENT ,.... 


May 


28, 1864 


Julv 


8, 1864 




Captain 


Jacob W. Brown 


Aug. 


15, 1861 


Jan. 


21, 1862 Resigned. 


Do 


Oorge W. Kirk 




15, " 




21, " Mustered out September 12, 1864. 


Do 


Henrv I). Kingsbury 


* 


17, 


* 


21, " Promoted to Maior. 


Do. 


John W. Wilson 


ti 


21, 


ii 


21, 


Promoted to Major. 


DO ;; 


Noah W. Ozan 


i* 


25, 


14 


21, 


Mustered out Septembe 12, 1864. 


Do 


Win. II. Eckles 


it 


26, 


tl 


21, 


Mustered out Septembe 12, 1864. 


Do 


John A. Chr.se 


** 


2S, 


it 


21, 


Mustered out Septemhe 13, 1864. 


Do 


Wilbur F. Stopl ord 


Sept. 


i; 


It 


21, 


Killed in action Septem >er 1, 1864. 


Do. 


D. Pomroy 




^ 


it 


21, * 


Mustered out Septembe 24, 1864. 


Do! 


James W. McCabe 


it 


ft 1 * 


14 


2l 


llesi Mied. 


Do 


Albert Moore 


Auff. 


16, 1862 Feb. 


16, 186.1 Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 



102 



OHIO IK THE WAR. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
J)u 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Win. B.Pugh 
David A.Gleason 
Henry W. Bigelow 
John J. Clarke 
Marshall Davis 
Win. B. Steedmau 
Henry G.Newbert 
Joseph B. Newton 
Henry B. Ferguson 
James E. McBride 


Nov. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Jan. 
April 


1, 186 
15, " 
20, 186 
IS, 186 

a 

13, " 

18, " 
18, " 
6, 186. r 
6, " 
20, " 


Nov. 

Mav 
Nov. 

Jan. 
April 


16, 186. 

29 J " 
18, 1864 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
6, 186;- 
6, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
21, 1862 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 


Mustered out. 
Honorably discharged January 11. 1865. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Detached at own request. 
Detached at own request. 
Transferred January, 1865. 
Mustered out.^ 
Mustered out September 28, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Discharged. 
Promoted to Captain and A. Q. M. W 
Mustered out September 27, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted bv President. 
Mustered out September 13, 1364. 
Promoted to Captain, 
iesigned March 29, 1862. 
iesigned January 27, 1864. 
romoted to Captain, 
iesigned February 5, 1863. 
iesigned September 10, 1864. 
iesigned October 14, 1862. 
romoted to Captain, 
^ronioted to Captain. 
Iesigned September 19, 1863. 
romotcd to Captain, 
romoted to Captain November 15,1862. 
romoted to Captain. 
J romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain, 
iesigned September 24, 1S64. 
romoted to Captain. 
)etached at own request, 
romoted to Captain. 
Never a member of regiment. 
Med of wounds September 23, 1864. 
>n detached duty, 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 


Do 


D< 
Do. 
Do 

Do 


Oscar N. Gunn 
David Bowkcr 


<;<>!>!> <> \V Eckl -s 


Aug. 


20, " 
15, 1861 
15, " 

n, " 


Jan. 


l*t Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Ezra B. Kirk 

Edward S Dodd 




Seth B. Moo 


David A. C.leason 
Robert E. Patterson 
Crawford C. Adams 
John J. Clark 
Robert Ju.st 
Win.H. Brownell 
Josiah Farrington 


Sept. 


21, " 
25, " 
26, " 
28, " 
1, " 
4, " 
5, " 


Feb. 


21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
16, 1863 
16, " 
16, " 
16, " 


Wm. B. Steedmun 
Janios B. Rutlige 
Henrv W. Bigelow 
Wm. B. Pugh 


Dee. 
Nov. 
Oct. 


21, 181)2 
2, 1861 
15, 18(12 


Joseph B. Newton 
Henry G. Newbert 
Henrv B. Ferguson 


Feb. 
an. 
May 

Nov. 


5, 1863 
20, " 
9, 1864 

9, " 

18, " 
18, " 
18, " 


May- 
No v. 


29, 1863 
29, " 
9, 1864 
9, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 
18, " 


Frank Fleck 


James E. McBride 
Wm. T. Bennett 


Jscur N. Gunn 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

E: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

85 
BS: 

3d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

fc: 


Charles B. Mitchell 
\ndrew J. Morse 


J; 


18, " 
18, " 
18, 
IS, 


| 


Joseph Reynolds 
Geor"e W Eckli-s 


Henry A. Valentine 
Harrison Wood _ 
Sampson A. Hildreth 
Mbert Burroughs 
Win B Moats 


an. 


18, 
18, 
18, 

,,., 

6, " 
6, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
15, 1861 

2l " 
25* " 
26, " 

28, " 
1, " 
* " 
5, " 


an. 

Vpril 
Jan. 


B: " 

is, " 

6, 1865 
6, " 
6, " 
6, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
21, 1862 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 
21, " 1 


Mustered out with regiment. 
lustered out with regiment. 
Mscharged. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out vrith regiment, 
f nstered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

romoted. 
\esigned August 14, 1862. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
It-signed February 11, 1862. 
Iesigned December 19, 1862. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
)ischargcd. 
iesigned November 26, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant December 21, T 3 
Mustered out December 12, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st LieuteiJTtnt. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed in action. 
Hied of wounds September 1. 1864. 
FMwt (it Lookout Monntain September 24, 64 
Resigned August 1, 1864. 
Tendered resignation. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


John P. Crawford 
Jesse Trapp 
John E Teal 


Vpril 
Vug. 

Sept. 


Isaac Bogart.... 


A lon/o H. Wood 
John 31. Hamilton 


Wm B Pugh 


Win N Roger* 


John Dixon 


Henry B. Ferguson 
Josia Johnson 
George E. Murray 


Wm. B. Steedman 
Alexander Wai p 
James B. Rutlige 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Marshall Davis 
Joseph B. Newton 
Frank Fleck 


Nov. 
\ng 


2, 1862 
16 


eb. 

\pril 
May 


16, 1863 
16, " 
16, " 
16, " 
16, " 
16, | 

1 S " 
16,* " 
16, " 
16, " 
6, 1864 
9, " 


Henrv G. Newbert 

Iscar N". Gunn 


Dec. 
Nov. 

Nov. 
Oct. 

Tan. 
Feb. 
Oct. 
May 


14, " 

20, " 
15, " 

1, " 
28, " 

16, " 
16, " 
20, 1-63 
.1, " 

9, 1864 1 


Wm. T. Benntt 


James McBride 
Walter B. Kirk 
N. 0. Cobb 
Ebner C. Tillittson 
John W. Beecher 
[saac L. Van Meter 
Henry H. Everhard 
Charles B. Mitchell 



FOURTEENTH OlIIO INFANTRY. 103 



FOURTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THERE are but few of the original records of the three-months regiments preserved. In 
fact, the majority had no special record further than the disabilities and sometimes actual 
sufferings of an illy-appointed encampment. 

After the first burst of patriotic indignation had expended itself, and was rendered futile by 
the want of system, large bodies of men, intended as the nuclei of regiments, lay in camp, often 
for weeks, awaiting muster into the service, and sometimes actually suffering for food and adequate 
shelter. These delays disgusted the recruits and damaged the service to an extent almost irre 
trievable. But, in the face of all these impediments, some regiments filled up immediately and 
presented themselves to the State ready for immediate service. Among these was the Fourteenth 
Ohio. It was raised in the Tenth Congressional District of Ohio, in and around Toledo. 

The President s Proclamation for seventy-five thousand men was responded to here just as it 
was in all parts of the State. Nearly one-half who offered their services had to be refused. In 
less than three days the Fourteenth Ohio was ready for the field, and on the 25th day of April, 
1861, (just twelve days after the firing on Fort Sumter), it started from Toledo for Camp Taylor, 
near Cleveland, where it was thoroughly drilled and its organization completed. On the 18th of 
May the regiment was transferred from the State to the General Government. 

The regiment left Cleveland on the 22d day of May for Columbus, there received their arms 
and accouterments, and on the same day started for Zanesville, Ohio ; arrived at 1 P. M. on the 
23d and immediately embarked fpr Marietta ; occupied Camp Putnam until the 27th of May, then 
was ordered to embark for Parkersburg, Va., at which place it landed without opposition, and for 
the first time the regimental flag of the Fourteenth was unfurled in the enemy s country. Imme 
diately on its arrival one company was double-quicked along the line of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad, the bridges of which were being fired by retreating Rebels as a signal of the arrival of 
National troops in Western Virginia. Four Rebels were taken in the act of firing a bridge and sent 
to the rear as prisoners guards were posted along the road to prevent further destruction ; and 
on the 29th the regiment moved forward until Clarksburg was reached, having repaired all the 
burnt bridges and culverts up to that point. At Clarksburg some important arrests were made, 
and the trains were put to running for supplies. 

On the 2d of June the regiment started by rail for the town of Webster, supplied with rations 
sufficient for a march to Philippi, a distance of thirteen miles. This march was performed on a 
dark, dismal, rainy night, to surprise a force of about two thousand Rebel cavalry in camp near that 
place. The march brought the regiment in front of the town at 5 A. M., wben a battery belonging to 
the force opened on the surprised Rebels. The expedition was not wholly successful, because of a 
mistake made by a co-operating force of National troops who were to have come from an opposite 
direction. However, the Rebels were frightened and scattered to the bushes and hills as fast as their 
horses could carry them, some leaving their clothing and boots behind, and making off almost 
in the Georgia costume of "a shirt and pair of spurs." A few prisoners, all the Rebel stores, and 
five wagon loads of arms and munitions fell into the hands of the National force. On the 



104 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

National side there were but four men wounded, including Colonel Kelly, afterward Major- 
General. One of the Kebel cavalry had his leg taken off by a cannon ball. 

On the next day the Fourteenth, in company with the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Ohio, Sixth 
and Seventh Indiana, and First Virginia Infantry, went into camp on the hills in the rear of the 
town of Philippi. 

From this camp expeditions were sent out against the guerrilla bands which infested that 
region ; forced marches were made, in which the men suffered terribly, and frequently to no 
purpose, as at that earlv period "scares" were very easily raised and the wildest reports implic 
itly believed. A few men lost their lives on either side, but nothing of consequence was gained 
by either party. On the 2d of July, 1861, the regiment received its first pay, in gold and Ohio 
currency. 

On the 7th of June the Rebels began to show themselves in force at Laurel Hill, and works 
were thrown up at Bealington to repel their attacks. Several cavalry charges made by the enemy 
were handsomely repulsed. On the 12th, General Garnett having suddenly retreated, the National 
forces moved out of their works, the Fourteenth taking the advance, took possession of a fort 
vacated by the enemy and pressed on after the retreating column. The Eebels were closely 
pressed, the road being strewed with trunks, boxes, tents, stalled baggage wagons and " tuckered- 
out " Rebels. In crossing Carrick s Ford the enemy was obliged to make a stand to save their 
trains. Taking a strong position they awaited the coming of the National forces. The advance 
guard of the Fourteenth was under the Rebel guns before they were aware of it. The Rebel flag 
was flaunted in their faces, and with shouts for Jeff. Davis came a shower of balls from the bluff 
above and opposite the stream. The Fourteenth closed up to its advanced guard and answered 
the enemy s first volley before the second had been fired. In twenty minutes, and just as the 
first regiment of the main column came up for action, the enemy gave way in great confusion, 
casting off everything that could retard escape. Over thirty well-laden baggage wagons, one 
battery, three stand of colors, and two hundred and fifty prisoners were the fruits of this victory. 
The next morning the regiment returned toward Philippi with the prisoners and captured train, 
fording at least six rivers and creeks swollen by the heavy rains, arriving at Philippi on the 15th 
of July. 

The Fourteenth remained in camp on Laurel Hill until the 22d, when it moved to and crossed 
the Ohio at Bellaire, and there took cars on the Central Ohio for Toledo and home. The wounded 
received great attention from the people along the road, and the regiment was tendered ovations 
and kindnesses without number. It arrived at Toledo on the 25th of July, where it was hailed 
by the ringing of bells and firing of cannon. After partaking of a sumptuous feast, prepared by 
the citizens at the Oliver House, the regiment dispersed, and after a few days rest at home the 
men re-assembled, and again volunteered, in a body, for three years or during the war. 

On the 23d of August, 1861, the Fourteenth received orders, and moved from Toledo to 
Cincinnati on the same day, reaching there in the evening. It was here supplied with arms and 
accouterments, and on the morning of the 25th crossed the Ohio to Covington, Ky., and took cars 
for Lexington and Frankfort. A short distance from Frankfort the train was assaulted by some 
of (he "chivalry" of Kentucky, by hurling a volley of stones against the officer s car, breaking 
its windows and injuring some of its inmates. The train was stopped, two of the rascals captured 
and taken into Frankfort. Marching up the main street, with the prisoners in the column, one of 
them was recognized by a citizen of the place, who rushed into the ranks and drew a butcher 
knife across his throat. Although 1 severely wounded the man did not die, and was placed in 
hospital. This incident serves to show the intense feeling between the loyal and rebel citizens of 
Kentucky at that day. 

Remaining in Frankfort two days, the regiment moved by cars to Nicholasville, and estab 
lished a camp of rendezvous, where for three weeks it was engaged in daily drill and was thor 
oughly disciplined. 

Camp Dick Robinson was its next stopping place, and was reached on the evening of October 
2d. While there a regiment of loyal East Tennesseeans arrived, having, as the men said, crawled 



FOURTEENTH OlIIO INFANTRY. 105 

on all fours through the Rebel lines. Among these brave and self-sacrificing loyal mountaineers 
were the then Tennessee United States Senator, Andrew Johnson, and Horace Maynard, Con 
gressman, on their way to Washington City. Colonel Steedman, of the Fourteenth, invited John 
son to share his tent for the night. The rough attire and begrimmed appearance of Johnson 
caused "the boys" of the regiment to remark that "Old Jim Steedman" would invite "Andy" 
to a free use of soap before he would allow him to bunk with him. The East Tennesseeans 
being without arms, discipline, or drill, a detail was made from the Fourteenth for the purpose 
of perfecting them in drill. 

About this time rumors were rife that the National forces stationed at or near Wild Cat, a 
desolate region sixty miles south-east of Camp Dick Robinson, were surrounded by the Rebels. 
The Fourteenth, with Barnet s First Ohio Artillery, started at once for Wild Cat, making forced 
marches through the deep mud and driving rain, and reached there at 9 A. M. of the 21st of 
October. On nearing the battle-field the crash of musketry and artillery was heard. This 
spurred the excited troops, who were going into their first engagement, and they double-quicked 
to the point of attack. Barnet s artillery was placed in position and the enemy shelled. Five 
companies of the Thirty-Third Indiana were on a wild knob almost completely surrounded 
by the Rebels. Under cover of a brisk fire from Barnet s battery, two companies of the Four 
teenth, with picks and shovels, crawled through the bushes over a ravine, and reaching the knob 
fortified it in such manner that the enemy shortly abandoned the siege and retreated toward 
London, Ky. The Rebels left on the ground about thirty of their number killed and wounded. 

The National forces pursued the Rebels under Zollicoffer to a point near London, and then 
went into camp for some two weeks. Orders were received to march back toward Lancaster, 
passing through Crab Orchard and Mt. Vernon. The next point was Lebanon, at which place 
the troops went into winter-quarters. 

On the 31st of December the camp at Lebanon was abandoned and the march resumed, taking 
the route toward Somerset or Mill Springs. At Logan s Cross Roads the Rebels under Zollicoffer 
were met and defeated. Only one company of the Fourteenth participated in this Compay C, 
Captain J. W. Brown, of Toledo. 

Following up their success, the National troops pursued and drove the Rebels into their forti 
fications at Mill Springs. The night of the 19th of January was consumed in cannonading the 
enemy s works. Early on the morning of the 20th a general assault was ordered and executed, the 
Rebel works carried, twenty pieces of artillery, all the camp equipage, and one regiment of men 
captured. The main body of Rebels crossed the Cumberland River in a steamer and escaped, 
burning the steamer as they left. In the charge which carried the works the Fourteenth was the 
first regiment to enter. Pushing on after the flying enemy the regiment reached the bank of the 
river in time to fire into the rear of the retreating column as it was boarding the steamer. 

The National forces remained at Mill Springs until the llth of February. Then, with five 
days rations, the line of march was resumed toward Louisville, passing through Stanford, 
Somerset, Danville, and intermediate places, arriving at Louisville on the 26th. Marching 
through the city, the Fourteenth was placed on board of transports, and in company with twenty 
thousand other troops left for Nashville, arriving there on the 4th of March. 

Remaining in and around Nashville, building fortifications and perfecting the drill of the 
rnen, until the 20th of March, the necessity of re-enforcing General Grant s forces at Pittsburg 
Landing being apparent, General Buell marched with the greater part of his army, reaching 
Savannah on the 6th of April. Taking steamers a portion of the troops were landed on the field, 
at Pittsburg Landing, on the morning of the 7th of April, in time to participate in the engage 
ment of that day, turning the tide of battle in favor of the National army. The Fourteenth did 
not come up in time to participate. 

On the night of the 12th of April the regiment was sent on an expedition to Chickasaw 
Landing, in the vicinity of which five or six bridges were destroyed, thus preventing the enemy 
from being re-enforced. In effecting this destruction several severe skirmishes were had. 

The regiment was taken back to Pittsburg Landing on a steamer on board of which was 



106 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

General Sherman, who publicly thanked the men for the service they had performed. The 
Fourteenth rejoined its brigade, and with the vast army then concentrated under General Halleck, 
shared in the slow advance on Corinth. The only death in the regiment, during the siege, was 
that of fifer Frank Callern, of heart disease. 

The regiment joined in pursuing the enemy to the vicinity of Booneville, Mississippi, where 
the chase was abandoned, the National troops returning to Corinth. 

On the 23d of June, 1862, the Fourteenth, with other troops, was sent to luka, Mississippi, 
and from there marched to Tuscumbia, Alabama. After doing duty of various kinds, in and 
around this place, the line of march was resumed toward Nashville, Tennessee, passing througli 
Florence, Fayetteville, Pulaski, etc. On this march General Robert L. McCook was murdered 
by guerrillas, near Waynesburg, Tennessee. Nashville was reached on the 7th of September. 
On the 14th marching orders were received for Bowling Green, Kentucky. This march was made 
in pursuit of Bragg s army, which was then moving on Louisville, Kentucky, which was reached 
on the 26th day of September, 1862. On this march the Fourteenth Ohio was under the command 
of Major Paul Edwards, Colonel Steedman having been assigned to General Robert L. McCook s 
late command, and Lieutenant-Colonel Este being absent on furlough. The march from Nashville 
to Louisville was one of great hardship, the weather being intensely hot, the roads very dusty, 
and water almost unattainable. 

On the 1st of October the National army, under General Buell, moved out of Louisville and 
resumed the pursuit of Bragg s Rebel army. Marching by the Bardstown road, the Fourteenth in 
the advance, Springfield, Kentucky, was reached on the second day and Bardstown on the third. 
On the 9th day of October the brigade, in which the Fourteenth was acting, was detailed as 
head-quarter and ammunition train-guard, and for that reason did not participate in the battle of 
Perryville fought on that day. 

General Buell s army moved in pursuit of the Rebels, marching through Danville and Crab 
Orchard, where the pursuit was abandoned and the National forces commenced a retrogade move 
ment toward Nashville. Gallatin was reached on the 15th of November, where the brigade, in 
which the Fourteenth Ohio was acting, went into winter-quarters. While at this place the regi 
ment was frequently detailed on scouting duty against the guerrilla (General John Morgan s) 
cavalry, with which it had several severe skirmishes losing some men. "At Rolling Fork, Morgan 
was badly whipped and driven off, thus preventing u contemplated raid against Louisville. The 
regiment remained at Gallatin until January 13, 1863, engaged in similar duty. Leaving Gallatin, 
Nashville was reached on the 15th day of January, and after a day s rest in that city the regiment 
marched to Murfreesboro , as guard to an ammunition and provision train, returning the same 
night to Lavergne, where the brigade was engaged in fortifying against the enemy. 

On the 3d day of June the regiment and brigade left Lavergne and took up the line of march 
for Triune, Tennessee, forming a portion of Rosecrans s advance on Tullahoma and Chattanooga. 
At Triune twenty days were consumed in rigid drill, gaining time to allow the necessary sup 
plies to come up. The march being resumed, Hoover s Gap was reached on the night of the 
26th of June, a brisk engagement coming off at that point, in which the Fourteenth participated 
with its brigade. Thirty men were lost in killed and wounded in this affair. The vicinity of 
Tullahoma was reached on the evening of the 28th day of June, and the enemy s videttes driven 
in. That night Captain Neubert s picket detail of the Fourteenth Ohio drove in the enemy s 
line of pickets, and reached a point so near the town as to enable him to discover that the Rebels 
were evacuating the place. This important information was immediately sent to head-quarters by 
Captain Neubert, and caused the advance, early the next morning, of the National forces. Elk 
River was crossed with great difficulty, that stream being quite deep, with a swift current, and 
a number of men were drowned. A spur of the Cumberland Mountains was crossed, and the 
National forces encamped in Sequatchie Valley on the 18th day of August, near Sweden Cove. 
On the 31st of August the army crossed the Tennessee River by means of rafts, the pontoons not 
being on hand. On the 19th of September the enemy was discovered in force on Chickamauga 



FOUKTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 107 

Creek. The Fourteenth Ohio, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Kingsbury, was immediately 
deployed in line of battle. The men were not in the best trim to engage in a fatiguing day s work, 
having marched incessantly all of the previous day and night, but they were ready and willing to 
perform their whole duty, and did it nobly. The regiment was engaged in hot and close contest 
with the enemy from nine A. M. to four P. M. Being then relieved, it replenished its ammuni 
tion boxes and again entered the fight, continuing in until sundown. That night it fell back 
one mile and went into camp. The next morning at nine o clock the regiment again entered the 
field and had a desperate encounter with a portion of Longstreet s Rebel division. An unfor 
tunate gap being left open by mistake in Thomas s line, the whole National force was compelled 
to fall back to prevent being overwhelmed. The village of Rossville was its stopping point. 

On the 21st of September the regiment, with its brigade and division, was in line of battle 
all day, but was again compelled to give ground and fall back into hastily-constructed intrench- 
ments near Chattanooga, the enemy following closely. The regiment went into the battle with 
four hundred and forty-nine men. Out of that number it lost two hundred and thirty-three 
killed, wounded, and missing. Fourteen enlisted men were captured by the enemy. Of fourteen 
officers, eight were severely wounded ; among them, Captains Albert Moore, company A ; II. W. 
Bigelow, cpmpany I ; Dan. Pomeroy, company D ; W. B. Pugh, company H ; J. J. Clark, com 
pany C ; and Lieutenant James E. McBride, company F. Colonel Croxton, of the Tenth Ken 
tucky, commanding the brigade, was also severely wounded. 

To procure rations on one occasion, during the ensuing beleaguerment at Chattanooga, a detail 
of one hundred men from the Fourteenth, under Captain Neubert, was sent to Stevenson, Alabama, 
crossing the rugged mountain between that place and Chattanooga. This detail started on a march 
of eleven days duration with only one day s rations. After encountering terrible hardships, subsist 
ing on parched corn, leaving along the roads the wrecks of more than half their wagons and the 
dead bodies of twenty mules, Stevenson was reached ; ten wagons out of the sixty they started 
with were loaded with " hard-tack/ and the return journey commenced. After twenty-five days 
absence this detail reached Chattanooga (9th of November) and distributed their precious freight 
among the famished troops. 

In the brilliant assault on Mission Ridge the Fourteenth Ohio bore a gallant part, charging 
and capturing a Rebel battery of three guns, which General Hardee in person was superintending, 
losing sixteen killed, ninety-one wounded, and three missing. 

On the 26th of November the National forces started in pursuit of the Rebel army toward 
Ringgold, at which point the enemy made a stand on the 28th. General Hooker s forces being in 
the advance, made a charge on the Rebels, but were driven back. The Fourteenth Corps coming 
up, formed a line of battle and charged the Rebel position, but the enemy had fled toward Buz 
zard s Roost. The Fourteenth Ohio returned to Chattanooga on the 29th of November, and was 
reviewed by General Grant on the 1st of December, 1863. 

Of those that were eligible, all but thirty men of the entire regiment re-enlisted for another 
term of three years. This occurred on the 17th of December. On Christmas-day the mustering 
of the men commenced, and by working hard all day and through the night the rolls were com 
pleted. Marching to Bridgeport on the 31st of December, the Fourteenth Ohio there took the 
cars and reached Nashville on the 2d day of January, 1864. On this trip the cold was so intense 
as to freeze the feet of several colored servants belonging to the regiment so badly as to make am 
putation necessary. 

From Nashville the regiment went by cars to Louisville, and thence by boat to Cincinnati, 
arriving at that city on the morning of the 4th of January. Cars were at once taken for Toledo, 
the home of the regiment, where it was warmly received by the citizens, and addressed in their 
behalf by the Hon. M. R. Waite. 

On the 6th day of February, the thirty days furlough having expired, the regiment moved 
by rail to Cleveland, and there went into camp. Remaining there about a week, it started for Cin 
cinnati and the front, reaching Nashville on the 23d of February and Chattanooga on the 29th. 

On the 5th day of March the regiment moved to Ringgold, where it performed hard duty in 



108 OHIO IN THE WAE. 

building corduroy roads between that place and Chattanooga, picketing outposts, etc. On the 9th 
day of May it moyed with its brigade on Dalton, driving in the enemy s videttes to the vicinity 
of Tunnel Hill, there encountering the enemy in force. At this point commenced that long, 
fatiguing campaign for the possession of Atlanta, the " Gate City " of the extreme South. The 
Fourteenth, in all the marches and the almost incessant skirmishes and flanking movements of 
that campaign, bore an honorable part. It lost heavily in men and officers. While lying in front 
of Atlanta the regiment lost twenty men killed and wounded. 

On the 26th of August a flanking movement was commenced toward Jonesboro , and on the 
31st the Atlanta and Western Eailroad was struck five miles north of Jonesboro , where two hun 
dred prisoners were captured. On the 1st of September the Third Division of the Fourteenth 
Army Corps, in which was brigaded the Fourteenth Ohio, continued the movement in the direc 
tion of Jonesboro , destroying the track of the railroad as it marched. At half-past four P. M. 
of that day the Third Division (General Baird) confronted the enemy s works surrounding 
Jonesboro . 

The Third Brigade, in command of Colonel Este, of the Fourteenth Ohio, of Baird s division, 
was drawn up in line of battle in the immediate rear of a regular brigade of General Carlin s 
division, which had just made an unsuccessful charge on the Rebel works in the edge of the woods 
on the opposite side of a large cornfield. Colonel Este, with his brigade, consisting of the Four 
teenth and Thirty-Eighth Ohio, Tenth Kentucky, and Seventy-Fourth Indiana, stood ready for 
the fight. Colonel Este gave the order : " Battalions, forward ! guide center ! " and General 
Baird waved his hand for the "forward." The lines moved steadily forward amid a shower of 
balls. A battery opened with grape and cannister, but the brigade moved steadily on. The edge 
of the timber was gained, and, with a yell and a charge, the Rebel works were gained, and a 
hand-to-hand conflict ensued. The Rebels belonged to General Pat. Cleburne s division, and con 
tested the ground with great stubbornness and bravery. It was not until many of them were 
killed with the cold steel that they would surrender. They finally succumbed and were marched 
to the rear as prisoners. The Fourteenth took nearly as many prisoners as the regiment num 
bered, a battery of four guns, several stands of colors, and two lines of trenches full of men. All 
this was not accomplished without sad cost. The brigade lost thirty-three per cent, of its num 
ber. One hundred members of the Fourteenth, whose time had expired, went willingly into this 
fight, some of whom were killed and many wounded. 

After the Jonesboro fight the brigade in which the Fourteenth was acting marched back to 
Atlanta, leaving the pursuit of the enemy to other troops. 

The Fourteenth next followed in pursuit of Hood s troops, on their advance into Tennessee, 
as far up as Rome, where the chase was abandoned, and the brigade returned to Kingston, 
Georgia, reaching there on the 6th of November. 

It next joined General Sherman s forces at Atlanta, and participated in the " march to the 
t>ea." Then came the march through the Carolinas to Goldsboro and Raleigh. 

At Raleigh the surrender of Lee and his army near Richmond was promulgated to the Na 
tional forces. The surrender of Johnston quickly followed, and then the march up to the Cap 
ital of the Nation, where the Grand Armies of the Republic passed in review before the President 
and Cabinet. 

On the 15th of June the Fourteenth Ohio started from Washington by rail for Parkersburg, 
on the Ohio River, arriving there on the 18th of June. It immediately embarked on boats and 
was taken to Louisville, Kentucky. Remaining in camp at that place until the llth day of July, 
the regiment was mustered out of the service and returned to its home, reaching Toledo on the 
13th of July, 1865, after over four years of as honorable and active a career as that of any regi 
ment in the army. 



FIFTEENTH OHIO INFANTKY. 



109 



15th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY * 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


MOSES R DICKEY.. 


Aug. T, isfil 
Oct. 21, 1862 
July 22, 18fi4 
Aug. 6, 1801 
11, 1862 
Oct. 24, " 
July 22, 1864 
Aug. 7, 1X61 
11, 1861 
Julv 22, 1864 
Fob. 28, 186; 
Sept. 20, 1861 
March 18, 1862 


Aug. 7, 1M61 
Nov. 28, 186L 
July 22, 1864 
Aug. 7, 1861 
26, 1S6L 
Nov. 28, " 
July 22, 1864 
Aug. 7, 1861 
26, 1862 
July 22, 1864 

Feb. 28, 1MW 
Oct. 21, 1861 
\pril 4 1862 


Resigned October 21, 1862. 
Honorably discharged July 19, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned August 11, 1862. 
Promoted to Colonel October 24, 1862. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Aug. 11, 1862. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned March 15, 1862. 

Resigned July 1, 1862. 
Resigned August 1, 1864. 
Resigned. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned July 13, 1862. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Promoted to Surgeon 33d regiment. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned April 15, 1862. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Died March, 1864. 
Promoted to Major August 11, 1862. 
Resigned July 27, 1862. 
Resigned May 4, 1862. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Oct. 24, 1862. 
Honorably discharged March 17, 1864. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned April 25, 1862. 
Resigned April 30, 1862. 
Resigned July 1, 1862. 
Revoked. 
Resigned July 1, 1862. 
Resigned March 18, 1863. 
Transferred to Invalid Corps. 
Mustered out. 
Dismissed April 6, 1863. 
Resigned April 1, 1863. 
Resigned June 1, 1863. 
Resigned August 1, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned April 28, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned October 2, 1864. 
Resigned June 14, 1865. 
Killed December 16, 1865. 
Resigned September 1, 1864, as 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Declined promotion. 
Mi detached service at muster out of reg t. 
Honorably discharged Jan 19, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Commission returned. 
Mustered out at expiration of service. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 
Do 


WM. WALLACE 
FRXNK \SKKW 


Lt Colonel 


\Vv T WI LSON 


Do 




Do 




Do 




Major 




Do 




Do 
Do 


ANDREW R. Z. DAWSOX 
JOHN N. Dtrnois 


Surgeon . 


OKRIX FERIUS 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


HKNUV STILLMAN 


I) S Il\LL 


June 2, " 
Aug. 1, " 
Sept. 26, 1864 
Oct. 14, " 
21, 1861 
Julv 13, 1862 
Aug. 12, " 
Julv 20, 1863 
March 14, 186: 
Sept. 20, 1861 
Julv 6, 186. ? 
Sept. 9, 1861 
" 10, " 
11, 

" W, 
" 20 
11, 
12, 

2. } 4 
Jan. .,0, 1862 
April 2a, " 
4 30, 
July 1, " 
1, " 


Juno 2, " 
Dec. 1, " 
Sept. 26, 1864 
Oct. 14, " 
Jan. 28, 1862 
July 22, 4l 
Vug. 12, 4l 
Julv 20, 186? 
March 14, 1865 
Oct. 21,1861 
July 20, 186? 
O( t. 17, 1861 
17, " 
17, " 
17, 4l 
17, " 
" 17, " 
" 17, " 
" 17. " 
" 17, " 
Nov. 20, " 
Ian. 30, 1862 
May 9, " 
10, " 
July 10, " 
Aug. 12, " 


HK.NUY II. SEIS 
WM. J. KELLY 
WM. M. CLAUK 
GKOIUJE Lir.uKTT 
WM. J. KELLY 
DAVII> WELSH 
WM M CLAUK. . . 


J. B. YOI-NT. 

RICH Vlil) L GANTEK 


Do 




Captain 




Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


John MeClenahan 
Hiram Miller 


Isaac M. Kirby 


Do. 


Amos Glover 


Do 
Do 


Andrew R. Z. Dawson 
Abraham C. Cummins 

T S Cillil iml 


Do 


Do rtthn S Ifullnwu- 


Do 
Do 
Do 


David J. Culbertson 
Cvrus Keasuner 
\ndrew M Burns 


Do 
Do 


Thomas E. Douglas 
Chandler W. Carroll 


Do 
Do 


David J. Culbertson 
Jeremiah "M Dunn 


Mav 4, " 

I uly 27, " 
Aug. 11, " 
Oct. 24, " 
March 18, 1863 
April 1, " 
44 6, 44 
Juno 1, 4l 
Nov. 21, " 
March 18, 1864 
July 9, |] 

*> 1J; i 

Oct. 12, 
Nov. 26, 
27, 
Tan. 18, 1865 
18, " 

:: : :: 

Feb. 2, " 

2, " 


12, " 
12, " 
Sept. 19, " 
Nov. 28, " 
April 7, 1863 
June 3, 
3, 
44 10, ll 
March 18, 1864 
18, " 
Jiily 9, || 

4- il; :: 

)ct. 12, 4l 
Nov. 26, 44 
44 27, 41 
Jan. 18, 1865 
18, " 
" 18, " 
" 18, " 
Feb. 2, 4 
2, 44 


Do 
Do. 


Joshua K. Brown 
Lorenzo Dan ford 


Do 


George W. Cummins 
John C, Bvrd 


Do. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


Samuel S. Pettit 
Calvin R. Taft 




Do 
Do 


Thomas W. Hanson 
Samuel Becktell 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


J. N. Dubois 
David X. Geiger 
Vesper Dor nick 
Augustus L. Smith 

Alexis Cope 


Alexander B. Lord 
Lucius Doolittle 


Do. 


Thomas C. Davis 


Do 


Collin P. Leiter 


Do. 

Do. , 


John J. Glover 
Joseph N. Welker 


Do 
Do. 
Do 


leese Pickering 
John W. Wilson 
D lvid Well 


28, " 
March 29, " 


44 28, 4l 
March 29, 41 


Do 

1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


lesse L. Grimes 
Theodore C. Bowles 


Sopt. 4^ " 
Aug. 31, 1861 
Sept. 9, " 
10, " 
11, " 
11, " 
12, " 


Sept. 4, 4l 
Oct. 21, 1861 
17, " 
44 17, " 
17, " 
17, 44 
17, 44 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned Mav 17, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain April 25,1862. 
romoted to Captain August 11, 1862. 
romoted to Captain July 27, 1862. 
romoted to Captain July 1, 1862. 
*romoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 
Mustered out August 17, 1863. 
lesigned May 26, 1862. 
{(signed Mav 30/63; mustered out Juno 1G, 62 
{esigned November 26, 1862. 
(evoked. 
{esigned December 19, 1862. 
3 romoted to Captain. 
Resigned July 3, 1862. 




leromiah M. Dunn 
rhoniiis E. Douglas !. 
David J. Culbertson 


Chandler W. Carroll 
Calvin R Taft 


13, " 
12, 4l 

20, || 

" 23! " 
Nov. 26, " 
Ian. 30, 1862 
\pril 25, " 
30 " 
May 26. 


|| 17, || 

]l] " 
44 17, " 
17, " 
Nov. 26, 4 
Jan. 30,18(2 
May 9, 
10, 
Jan. 26. 4 


fames B. Welch 

Wm C Scott 


Robert 11. Cochran 


Joseph Goldsmith 
John II Clark 


George W. Cummins 
John G. Gregg 



For three months Roster sco page 138. 



110 



OHIO IN THE WAH. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


let Lieutenani 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
M Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do, 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 




July 1, 1862 
1, " 
May 4, " 
July 27, " 
June 16, " 
May 26, " 

Oct! 24 1 " 
Dec. 19, " 


Aug. 12, 1862 
{9 

11^ " 
Sept. 19, " 
19, " 
Nov. 2s, " 
Dec. 31, " 
April 7, 1863 

June 3, " 
3, " 
11, " 
10, " 
" 10, " 
Sept. 9, " 
March 18, 1864 
Jan. 10, " 
March 18, " 
18, " 
July 9, " 
9, " 
Aug. 11, || 

Oct. 12] " 
12, " 
Nov. 26, " 
Dec. 27, " 
27, " 
Jan. 18, 1865 
IS, " 
18, " 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned May 30, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. TMav 30, 1863. 
Reinstated by req. of Maj. Gen. Buell; resig d 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Honorably discharged December 15, 1S63. 
Resigned March 7, 1S63. 
Promoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
romoted to Captain. 
Resigned January 24, 1865. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Killed September 20, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
romoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 
Honorably discharged Sept. 23, 1864, as 2d Lt. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed September 16, 1864. 
Revoked : wounded at Ricket Mills, Ga. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Honorably discharged July 21, 1865. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to Captain. 
No vacancy at time of promotion. 
No vacancy at time of promotion. 
No vacancy at time of promotion. 
I romoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out witli regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


Cyrus H. Askew 
Joseph Goldsmith 
John G. Byrd 
Robert H. Cochran 








Elze Stringer 


Samuel Becktell . . 


March 7, 1863 
IS, " 
April 1, " 

June ll , " 
Mav 30, " 
June 11, " 
Aug. 8, " 
March 18, 1864 


Samuel S Pettit 


Wallace McGrath 


David N. Geiger 
David S \dams 


Vesper Dor nick 




Alexander B. Lord 


Lucius Doolittle 
Alonzo J. Gleason 
Nathaniel Neiland 


March 18, 1864 
18, " 
July 9, " 
" 9, " 
Aug. 11, " 
11, " 
Oct. 12, || 

Nov. 26 " 
Dec. 27, " 
27, " 
Jan. 18, 1865 
18, " 
18, " 


Thomas C IHvis 


Charles J Rodi" 


Collin P Leiter 






Joseph N Welker 


Reese Pickering 
\ndrew J Gleason 


John W Wilson 


J?eter G Gardner 


lasper N. Welch 


James G. Gass 
David Weh 


" 18, " 
Feb 2 " 


" IS, " 
Feb. 2, || 

2 \\ 
10, 1865 
10, " 
2S, " 
March 29, " 
June 16, " 
16, " 
Sept. 4, " 


Jesse L. Grimes 
Jacob Boger 
Peter G. Gardner 


" 2, " 
2\ " 
" 2, " 
2, " 
10, 1865 
10, " 
28, " 
March 29, " 
June 16, " 
16, " 
Sept. 4, " 


Jasper N. Welch 
James G. Gass 


Robert S. McClenahan 
Morris Cope 
Franklin Armstrong 
Vincent T. Trago 


Samuel C. McKirahan 
Alexander Moore 


John R Clark 


" 10, 
11, " 
|| 11, | 

K?; i; 

20, " 
21, " 
23, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 
30, " 
April 25, " 
|| 25, || 
30, " 
30, " 
May 26, " 
Jiily 1, |i 

May K\ " 
)ct. 24, " 
March 18, 1863 


17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
Nov. 20, " 
Jan. 9, 1862 
30, " 
Mav 10, v> 
" 10, " 
10, 
10, 
Tune 26, 
July 10, 
Aug. 12, 
12, 
ept. 19, 
19, 
Nov. 28, 
April 7, 1863 

Juno 3, " 
3, " 
10, " 
10, " 
March 18, 1864 
8, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
I romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned December 18. 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. [3. 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieut. May 26/62; resi d July 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
I romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned August 1, 1863. 

Killed June 24, 1863. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Died of wounds received at Mission Ridge. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Detached at own request. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed at Kenesaw. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
I romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
} Commissions returned on account of not bo- 
ing ranking sergeants at date of issue. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
C om mission returned; not in line of promot. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out as sergeants with regiment. 
Complimentary commissions given after 
muster out. 


John G. Byrd 


Samuel Becktell 


jleorge W. Cummings 


Nicholas M. Fowler 

"raldwin D Chatlin 




J.G. Gregg 
Elze Stringer 




J. N. Dubois 


Lucius Doolittle 


Samuel S. Pettit 


Wallace McGrath 
Samuel Hellis 
Vugustus Smith 


\louy.o- J. Gleason 


Walter Hewittson 


Thomas Hanson 
\urlress E. Smilev 


Alexander B. Lord 


L homas C. Davis 


Nov. 28, 1862 
April 1, 18*13 
6, " 
Mav 30, " 
Jan. 1, " 
March Is, 1864 
Nov. 21, 1863 


Alexis Cope 


: rank W. Saunders 

Nathaniel Neiland. . 


Oliver Donner 
John J. Glover 




March 18, 1864 
18, " 
Nov. 4, 1863 
July 9, 1864 
" 9, " 
" 9, " 
" 9, " 
Nov. 26, " 
" 26, " 
" 26, " 
26, " 
Feb. 28, 1865 
June 16, " 
Nov. 24, " 
24, " 
" 21, " 
24, || 

" 24 " 
24, " 
24, " 


18 , " 
18, " 
30, " 
July 9, " 
" 9, " 
" 9, " 
9, " 
Nov. 26, " 
26, " 
" 26, " 
" 26, " 
Feb. 28, 1865 
Juno 16, " 
Nov. 24, 
24, 
" 24, 
24, 
24, | 

" 24* " 
24, " 


Joseph N. Welker 
Reese Pickering. . . 


Collin P. Leiter. . 


John W. Wilson 




i eter G. Gardener 
lasper N. Welch 
James G. Gass 
rlobert S. McClenahan 
Morris Cope 
! ranklin Armstrong 
Vincent T. Trago 
Vlexander Moore 
jleorge W. Chessell 
(ohn J. Gregory 
lohn A. Green 
, alvin Etzler 
Henry M Leedy 


fohn Crampton 
fames O. Scott 
David C. Thurstin 



FIFTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. Ill 



FIFTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE FIFTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY was among the 
first to respond to the President s call for seventy-five thousand men for three months 
service, and on the 4th of May, 1861, the regiment was organized at Camp Jackson, Colum 
bus, Ohio, and four days after moved to Camp Goddard, near Zanesville, Ohio. Here it spent 
about ten days, engaged in drilling, disciplining, and active preparations for the field. It was 
then ordered into West Virginia, and crossing the Ohio River at Bellaire, it was employed for 
some time in guard duty on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, advancing as far as Grafton. It 
was engaged in the rout of the Rebels under General Porterfield at Philippi, on the 13th of June, 
and afterward took part in the affairs of Laurel Hill and Carrick s Ford. The regiment per 
formed a large amount of marching and guard duty and rendered valuable service to the Govern 
ment in assisting to stay the progress of the Rebels, who were endeavoring to carry the war into 
the North. Having served its term of enlistment, it returned to Columbus, Ohio, and was dis 
charged about the 1st of August, having lost but two men one killed and one died of disease. 

The President having issued his call for three hundred thousand men for three years, the 
soldiers of the Fifteenth felt the importance of a hearty response, and with their patriotism and 
ardor not lessened, but rather increased by the trials and exposure incident to their three months 
campaign, they almost immediately and almost unanimously resolved to re-enlist; and the regi 
ment was reorganized at Camp Mordecai Bartley, near Mansfield, Ohio, and left Camp Bartley for 
Camp Dennison on the 26th of September, 1861. At this place they received their arms and the 
remainder -of their clothing, camp, and garrison equipage. The regiment was armed with old 
Springfield and Harper s Ferry muskets altered, except companies A and B, which received 
Enfield rifles. 

The outfit being completed, on the 4th of October the regiment left for the field, its destination 
being Lexington, Kentucky. It remained in camp at Lexington until the 12th, when it was trans 
ported by rail to Louisville, and from there to Camp Nevin near Nolin s Station, Kentucky. At 
this place it was assigned to the Sixth Brigade, (General R. W. Johnston commanding), Second 
Division, (General A. McD. McCook commanding), of the Army of the Ohio, then commanded by 
General W. T. Sherman, subsequently by General Buell. The regiment remained at Camp Nevin 
until the 9th of December, 1861, when the division marched to Bacon Creek, and on the following 
day the Sixth Brigade occupied Mumfordsville. On the morning of the 14th the Second Divis 
ion broke camp, moving in the direction of West Point to embark for Fort Donelson ; but upon re 
ceiving intelligence of its capture, the division was marched to Bowling Green. Crossing Bar 
ren River on the 27th, the command marched for Nashville, Tennessee, which place was reached 
on the 2d of March. Camping grounds were selected about three miles from the city, and the army 
rested till the Kith, when the march to Savannah began; which point was reached on the night 
of April 6th, and on the morning of the 7th the regiment embarked for the battle-field and was 
engaged from about 12 M. till 4 P. M., when the enemy retreated. In this engagement the regi 
ment lost six men killed and sixty-two wounded. 

In the subsequent operations against Corinth the Second Division formed the reserve of the 



112 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

army and did not take the front until the 27th of May. It was continually skirmishing with the 
enemy until the 30th, when the town was occupied by our forces. On the 10th of June the divis 
ion marched to Battle Creek, Tennessee, crossing the Tennessee Elver at Florence, and resting there 
several days, arrived at Battle Creek on the 18th of July. The regiment was engaged in building 
a fort at the mouth of Battle Creek, and in the ordinary duties of camp, until the 20th of August, 
when General McCook s command moved to Altemonte on the Cumberland Mountains, in which 
direction the invading army under Bragg was marching. From Altemonte the division marched 
via Manchester and Murfreesboro to Nashville, arriving there on the 8th of September. After 
halting two or three days the army marched to Bowling Green, and thence by way of West 
Point to Louisville, arriving on the 25th of September. On the 1st of October the Second Divis 
ion marched on the Shelbyville Pike in pursuit of the enemy, reaching Shelbyville the second 
day; remaining in camp a few days the march was resumed to Lawrenceburg, where a skirm 
ish was had with the enemy, in which the regiment was engaged. The division then marched 
to Perryville, which was reached a few days after the battle of Chaplin Hills, and there joined 
the main army and marched in pursuit of Bragg as far as Crab Orchard, where it remained 
several days, and then marched to Nashville, Avhere it arrived on the 7th of November, 1862. 

The army was reorganized and thoroughly drilled here, and on the 26th of December 
advanced upon the enemy s position at Murfreesboro . In the battle of Stone Biver the regiment 
was heavily engaged, losing eighteen killed and eighty-nine wounded. After the occupation of 
Murfreesboro by the army under General Eosecrans, the Fifteenth was engaged in drilling, fora 
ging, fortifying, and picket duty, until the 24th of July, when an advance was ordered on Tulla- 
homa and Shelbyville, which places were occupied by our army after the enemy was dislodged 
from his strong position at Golner s and Liberty Gaps, the latter being carried by the Second 
Division, and this regiment taking a very prominent part throughout. In this engagement one 
officer and seven men were killed, and twenty-three wounded. The Second Division was stationed 
at Tullahoma till the 16th of August, when it was ordered to Bellefonte, Alabama, marching via 
"Winchester and Salem, and arriving at its destination on the 22d. Remaining there about a week, 
the division marched to near Stevenson, Alabama. On the 2d of September the march was re 
sumed in the direction of Rome, Georgia, crossing Lookout Mountain and camping at the 
eastern foot, near Alpine, on the -10th. After remaining in position for two days the command 
recrossed Lookout Mountain to Winson s Valley, and on the llth marched to a position in con 
nection with the main army in Lookout Valley. 

The regiment remained in position on the extreme right flank of the army until the morning 
of the 19th when it marched for the battle-field of Chickamauga, a distance of thirteen miles, and 
was engaged soon after its arrival. At Chickamauga the regiment lost one officer and nine men 
killed, two officers and sixty-nine men wounded, and forty men missing. The regiment bore its 
share in the arduous labors and privations of the seige of Chattanooga, and on the 25th of Novem 
ber participated in the brilliant assault of Mission Eidge, capturing a number of prisoners and 
some artillery. On the 28th of November the regiment, then belonging to the First Brigade, 
Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, marched with the corps to the relief of Knoxville, Ten 
nessee, arriving on the 8th of December; on the 20th the command moved to Strawberry Plains 
by way of Flat Creek. 

On the 14th of January, 1864, the greater portion of the regiment having re-enlisted as veter 
ans, it started for Columbus, Ohio, via Chattanooga, preparatory to being furloughed. The regi 
ment arrived in Columbus, with three hundred and fifty veterans, on the 10th of February, and 
the men were furloughed on the 12lh. On the 14th of March the regiment assembled at Camp 
Chase to return to the field, having recruited to upward of nine hundred men. Upon arriving 
at Nashville, on the 22d, the regiment was ordered to march to Chattanooga, arriving on the 
5th of April. On the 8th the regiment moved to Cleveland, Tennessee, meeting with a 
serious accident near Charleston, Tennessee, by a railroad train being thrown from the track, by 
which twenty men were more or less injured. 

The regiment moved to McDonald s Station on the 20th, and remained there till the opening 



FIFTEENTH Omo INFANTRY. 113 

of the spring campaign. At noon, on the 3d of May, the regiment broke camp and marched to 
Tunnel Hill, where General Sherman s army took position, and was constantly skirmishing with 
the enemy, this regiment being frequently engaged until the 13th, when the enemy evacuated 
Rocky Face Ridge and our army took possession of Dalton. 

The Fifteenth participated in the subsequent pursuit of the Rebels, in the battle at Resaca 
and again in the pursuit and engagement near Dallas, where the regiment suffered severely 
losing nineteen men killed, three officers and sixty-one men wounded, and nineteen men 
missing, who were supposed to be either killed or severely wounded. The color-guard, with 
the exception of one corporal, were all either killed or wounded, but the colors were safely brought 
^ff by the surviving member of the guard, Corporal David Hart, of company I. The Rebels 
having evacuated their works on the 5th of June, the army moved to the vicinity of Acworth, 
and on the 10th advanced near to Kenesaw Mountain. While skirmishing sharply, on the 14th of 
June, the regiment lost one officer and one man killed, and five men wounded, all belonging to 
company A. On the morning of June 18th, the Rebels having withdrawn, a party of three or 
four men advanced to reconnoiter, and picking up a couple of stragglers they were sent back in 
charge of Peter Cupp, a private of company II, who, in returning to the regiment, suddenly came 
upon a Rebel outpost which had been left by accident. Cupp announced the withdrawal to 
them and ordered them to stack their arms and surrender, which they did, and one captain, one 
lieutenant and sixteen men of the First Georgia Volunteers, were marched into our lines by pri 
vate Cupp. While in the vicinity the regiment was engaged in scouting and skirmishing, fre 
quently capturing prisoners. 

After crossing the Chattahoochie the regiment moved down the river on the llth of July, 
and in connection with the division, drove back the enemy s cavalry and covered the crossing of 
the Fourteenth Corps. The line was advanced each day until it closed in around the Rebel works 
before Atlanta. On the night of August 25th, the command to which the regiment belonged 
withdrew from the works in front and commenced the movement upon the communications in 
rear of Atlanta, skirmishing with the enemy at Lovejoy s Station. The army withdrew from 
Lovejoy s Station on the night of September 5th, and reaching Atlanta the 8th, the Fourth 
Corps encamped near Decatur. 

When the army of Hood began its raid upon our communications the regiment marched via 
Marietta and Rome, to the relief of Resaca, October 3d, and from Resaca it marched through 
Snake Creek Gap, by way of Salesville, Chattanooga, and Pulaski, to Columbia, where it was 
engaged in a slight skirmish. From Columbia the army moved toward Franklin, passing in view 
of the camp-fires of a corps of the enemy near Spring Hill, Tennessee. The regiment did not 
participate in the battle of Franklin, but was assigned the duty of covering the withdrawal of the 
forces and the retreat to Nashville. At Nashville the regiment formed the extreme left of the 
army, and when the order came for the left to move forward the regiment advanced rapidly, cap 
turing a fine battery of four brass guns and some thirty prisoners. On the 16th of December the 
enemy was found entrenched in a strong position on the Franklin Pike, about five miles from the 
city. The regiment participated in a movement upon these works, capturing prisoners to the num 
ber of two commissioned officers and one hundred men. The entire loss sustained by the regiment 
in the two days of the fight was two officers and one man killed, and two officers and twenty-four 
men wounded. The most vigorous pursuit was made by our army, but the infantry was unable to 
overtake the flying enemy, and after following the Rebels to Lexington, Alabama, the corps 
moved in the direction of Huntsville, and the regiment went into Camp at Bird Springs about the 
4th or 5th of January, 1865, and remained till the 15th of March when it was ordered to move 
into East Tennessee. 

It moved by railroad to New Market, Tennessee, and then took up the line of march to 
Greenville, to assist in preventing the escape of Lee and Johnson, while Grant and Sherman 
pressed them to a surrender. The Fifteenth arrived at Greenville on the 5th of April, and on the 
22d was ordered back to Nashville. On this march the regiment acted as train guard and reached 
Nashville about the 1st of May, 1865. From this time till the IGth of June, the regiment was 
YOL. II. 8. 



114 



OHIO ix THE WAR. 



in camp near Nashville, Tennessee, when orders were received to move to Texas. With a good 
degree of cheerfulness the men turned their backs once more upon their homes, went to Johnston- 
ville and thence by boat to New Orleans. Moving down a short distance below the city they 
bivouacked in the old Jackson Battle Ground till July 5th, when they shipped for Texas. The 
regiment arrived at Indianola, Texas, July 9th ; disembarked, and in order to obtain a sufficient 
supply of water marched that same night to Green Lake, a distance of about twenty miles. 
Remaining here just one month, on the 10th of August it marched for San Antonio, a distance of 
ono hundred and fifty miles. The scarcity of water, the extreme heat, the want of suitable 
rations, together with inadequate transportation all combined, made this one of the most severe 
marches the regiment ever endured. It readied the Salado, a small stream near San Antonio, on 
the 21st of August, and remained there until October 20th, when it was designated to perform post 
duty in the city, and it continued to act in this capacity till November 21st, when it was mustered 
out and ordered to Columbus, Ohio, for final discharge. The regiment left San Antonio on the 
24th of November, and marched to Indianola, proceeding thence by way of New Orleans and 
Cairo to Columbus, Ohio, where it arrived December 25th, and was finally discharged the service 
of the United States on the 27th of December, 1865. 

The Fifteenth was among the first regiments to be mustered in, and among the last to be mus 
tered out, having been in the service as an organization about four years and eight months. Few 
regiments present a better record upon battle-fields and marches than the Fifteenth, while in 
respect to the intelligence and moral character of its officers and soldiers it holds an enviable 
position. 



15th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE 


F RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 


OEO. W. ANDREWS 
Mosr.s R. DrcKKY 

S. B. W\I,KER 


May 


4, ISiU 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
17, " 


May 


4, ISiil 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
17, 




Surgeon 
Ass t Surgeon 
Captain 

1)0 

1)0 


ORRIN FERIUS.. .. 


J. N. MOURY 


R. W. 1>. M use 
\Vm. Wallaro. 
\Vm T. Wilson 


April 
May 

April 


H " 
l,s, " 
li, " 

20, || 

2< r, " 

20, " 


April 
May 
April 


1 

2o 

2o 
20, 


Do Abraham ( .Cummins 
Do Israel I). Clark 


Do Abraham Kasra 
Do 1 1 eter \ Tvler 


Do Hiram Mille,- 
Do I-aar, M . Kirbv. 


Do 

1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2(1 Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


W. V. M. Lavto!) 


James W. Cark 
Franklin W. Martin 
Tihnan II. Wisjdns 


2. !, 


- g; 


Charles B. Smith 
War re nt Owens 
Win. II. Kilmer 
Andrew R. /. Dawson 
Davi.l J. Cnlb"rton 
Samuel R, Mott,jr 
Alb- rt Spaiilding 
C. W. C )\vau 


April 
May 
A pril 
-May 

June 


2o " 

2(V " 
B, " 
S, " 
?,, " 


April 
Mav 
April 
May 

June 


e! 

20, 
(1, 
20, 

8. 

3, 


.Joseph Fra/.ier 


April 


18 > ! 

20, 


|| 

April 


22, 
2::. 
18, 
18, 

20* 


Henry C Miner 


Henry B. iiavlord 

Ralston Cnii"- 


Joel F Skillin"-s 


Frederick A^erton 


Samii -l B;ic!itell April 


20, 


April 


20, 




-Ul> 





SIXTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



18th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


EEMABKS. 


Colon -l 
I t (V-. U l 


JAMESIRVTNF 


May 

A, -il 

May 
June 

May 

April 


3, I86i 

3 " 
3 " 
4 " 
4 " 

4 || 

4 || 

23 
21 

23 
23 

3 " 
4 || 

4 " 


May 

April 

May 
An?. 
May 

April 


3, 181 11 
3, " 

! " 
4, 
4, 

4, 
2:% 

2 % 
23, 

23, ( 

*4, 1 


Resigned. 
Discharged on acct. plus. dis. June 13, 1861. 


Ma.ior 

Ass t SUI-MVHII 
Captain 

Do 
ltd 
Do 

Do 


<i. W. 15.UI.KY 

.). D. ROIUNSON 
C. K. DI..NH; 
.1. D. Nicholas 
Thomas J. Kinncy 
\auila Wilcv 


Kit-hard W. McClain 






Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do! 


J:uii -s McXultv 


James \V. Moore 
Mil er Moodv 


Milton Mills 

.1 Hunt T Odl : 11 


Davi.I W. Marshal! 
Win. B. McCarty 
ushman Cunningham 
Willis C. Workman 
Win. II. Wad- 


Charles T. Ep\ 
John A. Irviii" 
Charl-s II. Moore 


May 

April 
May 
April 


2:1 

IS " 
IS " 

4 " 
1 " 
23 " 


May 

M^ 
April 


23J II 

is 
is, | 

4, 


Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2cl Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Aumist W. Loback 
Wm Hannah 


David W. Marshall 


Li-vi M lliii"hai-t 


.l.irncs McClintock 
Sainii-l L. Wils.m 
Joseph C. I luni tni-r 
Albert Shaw 
Korsct Pool 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 


Win Spaii"l<-r 


May 

Juno 


22 " 
2:: 
23 

is li 


May 

Aug. 


2. , 
23, || 

in , " 


John T. Rainev 
Jamos Riddle.. 
Wm Dorsrv 


Ilamilton Richc^on 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE ( 


FRANK. COM. ISSUED. REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
D 
Maior 
D 
DC 
Do 


JOHN F. DF.COFRCEY.... 

GF.ORGE W. BAILEY 
PHILIP KESIIXKR 
PHILIP KKSHNKR 
RORF.UT W. P. MUSK 
MILTOX MILLS 
KLI W. BuTsroni) 
BASIL B. BHKASIIKK 


Sept. 
Aug. 

Jan. 


22, 1861 Honorably discharged March 31, 1864. 
;i, li Honorably discharged August 27, 1862. 
27, 862 Clustered out October 31, 1864. 
V, 861 Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
27, 862 Resigned January 13, 1863. 
13, -f,.", April 23, 1863 Resigned February 12, 1864. 


Surgeon 
Ass t Surgeon 

Do! 
Do! 
Do! 


Sept. 


7, sr,i blustered out October 31. 1864. 


BYRON S. CHASE 
ISAAC N. KM.SHERKY 
OLIVER POME ROY 


Nov. 
Aug. 
July 


l " Appointed Surg n Miss, col d rgt. June 10, 63. 
2;">, S62iFch. 10, 1863 Dismissed August 8, 1<63. 
<), 863 July li, "1 Resigned March 23, 1864. 




March 
Sept 


1H, S62 April 4, isc.L Resigned February 18, 1863. 
13 861 1 Promoted to Major 




Milton Mills 




KM W. Botsford 




Hi, " Promoted to Maior. 


Do 

"Do. 


Rob"rt W. P. Mus" 
Samuel Smith 


Oct. 

" 


~f,\ " !!!..! !!!!! Resigned January 10, 1862. 
12, " Jan. l.~>, 1862, R -siirm-d November 16, 1863. 
26, " Died October 7, 1862. 


Do 
Do 


Hamilton Richeson 
W. R. Monroe 


Do 


Richard W. Kannvliill 


,,:; ; . 

May 


28, " ! Resigned March 1, 1864. 
1, " ! Killed December 29, 1862. 
3, 1862! .Mustered out October 31, 1864. 

ft , " ... .... . .. ......." IMsiniss ed March 13, 181)3. 
7, " Resigned August 9, 1863. 
28, " i Mustered out with regiment. 
9, 1864 May J, 1864 Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 
Do. 


Wm. P. Vandoorn 

Josi-ph Ed"-ar 


Do 
Do 


Robert W. Li-ggctt 
Cushman Cunningham 


Do 

DO! !!!!!!!!: 

Do. 


Absalom Finch 
Wm M Ross 


George J. Jones 
Philip M. Smith 


May 


V l,s6-tjMav <l, 1864 Mustered out with regiment. 
9, "1 " y. " Mustered out with regiment. 



116 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



DATE OF RANK . 



COM. ISSUED. 



Captain . 
l)o. . 
Do. . 
Do. . 
Do. . 
let Lieute 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
3d Lieute 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



Silas H. Corns 

Wm. Dorsey 

Samuel Lichty 

Win. Buchanan 

Resin H. Voorhes 

Clavert W. Cowan 

Samuel Edge 

George W. Stein 

Joseph Edgar 

Lewis Moore 

Wm P. Vandooru 

Wm. M. Ross 

Absalom Fincli 

Hiram N. Shatter 

Cushman Cunningham 

Manuel B. De Silva 

George J. Jones 

Philip M. Smith 

Robert W. Leggett 

Silas II. Corns 

Charles B. Smith 

Wm. Dorsey 

Samuel Lichty 

Josiah B. Beall 

Win. Buchanan 

Resin II. Voorhes 

Benj. F. Hackert 

John N. Bowling 

II. S. Wood 

Wm. II. Ruckle 

Chas. W. Oldroyd 

Anthony W. Somers.... 

Wm. W. Woodland 

Madison E. Storrs , 

George II. Clark 

Wm. Dorsey , 

Isaiah S. Beall 

Robert W. Leggett 

John Blessing 

George J. Jones , 

Addison S. McClure 

Hamilton Richeson 

Philip M. Smith 

Samuel Lichty 

Win. W. Boyd 

Win. Lightcap 

Resin H. Voorhes 

Wm. Buchanan 

B. F. Heckert 

Silas H. Corns 

John N. Bowling 

H. S. Wood 

Edward O. G. Reed 

Wm. H. Ruckle 

Martin H. Norton 

Chas. W. Oldroyd 

Anthony W. Somers.... 

Wm. W. Woodland 

Madison E. Storrs 

George H. Clark 



May 

July 

Sept. 



Nov. 



9, 1864 
25, |j 

30* " 

10, 18hl 
1.,, " 



May 
July 



Dec. 
Feb. 



Aug. 

Oct. 



28, 

1, 

3, 1862 
ll>, %l 

6, " 

7, " 



Feb. 
Nov. 



Feb. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

March 

May 



July 

Sept. 



15, 1 
28, 
15, I 

8, 18 -1 

9, 
9, 

9, 

J, 

9, 
25, 
>-, 

2ft, 

30, 

13, 18*5] 
19, " 
23, " 



May 



March 
May 



July 



Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Deceased May 17, 1864, as 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Resigned. [16, 1864. 

Mustered out at expiration of service, Sept. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain February 19, 1S62. 

llesi-ned. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Dismissed February 15, 1863. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Dismissed from service July 22, 1SC3. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain August 6, 1S62. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain ; deceased May 17, 1S64. 

Revoked ; resigned as 2d Lieutenant. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned April 27, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant February 19, 63 

Resigned November 15, 1862. 



Aug. 
Oct. 
Nov. 

Feb. 
Aug. 

Feb. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
March 



26, " 

7, " 
28, " 

1, " 
3, 1862 
19, " 

25; " 

8, " 
15, " 
15, 1863 
28, 1862 
15, 1863 



18, 1864 



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned October 20, 1862. 

. Dismissed February 15, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 



18f,2 



May 



Feb. 
March 



noted to 1st Lieutenant.. 
noted to 1st Lieutenant" 
gned July 16, 1863. 
noted to 1st Lieutenant. 



ased August 17, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 



SIXTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 117 



SIXTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THIS regiment was organized under Colonel John F. DeCourcey, at Camp Tiffin, near 
Wooster, Ohio, on the 2d day of October, 1861, and was mustered into the service on 
the same day by Captain Belknap, of the Eighteenth United States Regulars. It reached 
Camp Dennison November 28th and remained there until the 19th of December, when, receiving 
its arms, it moved to Lexington, Kentucky. On January 12, 1862, orders were received to report to 
General S. P. Carter, at Somerset, Kentucky. At this point the regiment was engaged in repair 
ing and building military roads to facilitate the transportation of supplies to General Tlx)mas J B 
forces at Mill Springs. 

The battle of Mill Springs was fought and won by General Thomas on the 19th of January. 
The regiment was ordered up during the fight, but being retarded by a flood in Fishing Creek, 
did not reach the ground until after the enemy had been routed. 

On January 31, 1862, the regiment left Somerset, Kentucky, and marched across the country 
to London. After a short rest at this point it continued its march to Cumberland Ford, arriving 
there on the 12th of February. Nothing of interest transpired during its stay. 

On March 12th a reconnoissance in force was made toward Cumberland Gap, but with the 
exception of a slight skirmish with the enemy nothing was accomplished. Another reconnois 
sance was made on the 22d of March. About this time the regiment was brigaded with the Forty- 
Second Ohio and Twenty-Second Kentucky, forming the Twenty-Sixth Brigade, Seventh Division, 
Army of the Ohio, under command of Brigadier-General George W. Morgan. 

On April 28th another reconnoissance was made to the top of the Cumberland Mountains in 
the vicinity of Cumberland Gap/ The mountain was climbed in the midst of a heavy fog. 
Arriving at the top at eight A. M. they met the enemy and a brisk fight ensued, which lasted till 
the middle of the afternoon. The regiment lost one man killed and two wounded. 

The month of May was occupied in preparing for the assault on Cumberland Gap. On 
June 10th the march was resumed toward the Gap. On the morning of the 17th of June the 
regiment marched up Powell s Valley to the rear of Cumberland Gap, where it was discovered 
that the enemy had abandoned that stronghold and retreated toward Knoxville, Tennessee. The 
Sixteenth was the first regiment to enter the enemy s abandoned intrenchments and raise the 
National colors. From this time until the 3d of August the troops were engaged in strengthen 
ing the position, drilling, and foraging, with frequent skirmishing. 

On August 6th the Sixteenth was ordered to relieve the Fourteenth Kentucky, at Tagewell. 
About ten A. M. of that day two companies (B and E) of the regiment were sent forward as 
advance pickets. Companies Fand D were ordered to the right of the Main Hill Road on the 
same duty. Companies C and G were held in reserve. At eleven A. M. heavy skirmishing 
commenced at the front and continued until the enemy appeared on the front and right in force. 
Companies D and F were compelled to fall back. Companies B and E were cut oft from the 
main force by a Rebel brigade, and most of them captured. Companies C and G were ordered 
up as a support, but were also overwhelmed and compelled to fall back to a position on the left 
of the road. They were now re-enforced by stragglers from other companies and held the enemy 
in check for two hours, when the ammunition was exhausted. They then fell back to the main 
line, where the National forces were massed. Toward night the National army retreated into the 
intrenchments, the enemy following to within three miles of the Gap. 



118 OHIO ix THE WAK. 

On September 8th the Sixteenth Ohio and- its brigade were ordered to Manchester, Kentucky, 
for supplies. On the 19th this force was joined by the remainder of the National troops from 
the Gap. The supplies having been almost completely exhausted, General Morgan ordered a 
retreat toward the Ohio Riverf This retreat was opposed by the enemy, who harrassed the 
National forces by frequent attacks, and by placing obstructions in the roads, up to Gravson, 
Kentucky, within twenty-five miles of the Ohio River. The sufferings of the men on this march 
were very severe, having nothing to eat for several days excepting ears of corn gathered from the 
fields as they passed. To quench their thirst the men were compelled to drink the water col 
lected in stagnant pools. On the 3d of October the command arrived at Greenupsburg, Ken 
tucky, on the Ohio River, utterly worn out, ragged, shoeless, and covered with the accumulated 
dust of sixteen days march. Their appearance was forlorn in the extreme. 

Resting until the 21st of October at Portland, Ohio, the regiment then moved to Charles 
ton, Virginia, on the Kanawha River. On November 10th it marched, under orders, to Point 
Pleasant, Virginia, and there embarked on steamers for Memphis, Tennessee, arriving at that 
place on the 27th of the same month. On December 20th it moved with Sherman s command on 
transports to the rear of Vicksburg, Mississippi, and participated, on the 29th, in the disastrous 
assault on Chickasaw Bayou. In this affair the Sixteenth suffered terribly, losing three hundred 
and eleven officers and men killed, wounded, and prisoners. After the assault the command of 
the regiment devolved on Captain E. W. Botsford. 

The next service performed by the regiment was in the expedition against Arkansas Post. 
That post being captured the Sixteenth Ohio, with other troops composing the expedition, were 
taken back to Young s Point, Louisiana. The regiment remained here until 8th March, and 
then moved to Milliken s Bend. 

On April 6, 1863, the regiment joined General Grant s expedition to the rear of Vicksburg. 
It was engaged at Thompson s Hill on the 1st of May, and lost nine men killed and wounded. 
It was also engaged at Champion Hills, or Baker s Creek, on 16th of May, and on the 17th at 
Black River Bridge. On May 19th it took a prominent part in the disastrous assault on the 
Rebel works in the rear of Vicksburg. In these several affairs the regiment lost severely in 
killed and wounded. On the 22d of May it was again engaged in an assault on the Rebel works, 
losing several men killed and bounded. It remained in the rear of Vicksburg until its fall, 
July 4, 1S63. On the 6th of July it was ordered to Jackson,.Mississippi, where it participated 
in the siege and capture of that place. 

The regiment now marched back to Vicksburg, where it was placed on transports with orders 
to report to the commanding officer at New Orleans, Louisiana. It arrived at Carrollton, six 
miles above the city, on the loth of August. 

General Banks s expedition to the Teche country was then forming at New Orleans, and the 
Sixteenth was made a part of it. About the 7th of September the expedition left New Orleans. 
Starting from Algiers, opposite the city, the regiment moved by railroad to Brashear City, and 
from thence marched across the country to Opelousas. Returning to New Orleans it joined the 
expedition under General "Washburne to Texas, landing at DeCrow s Point, on Matagorda Penin 
sula. From thence it went by steamer to Indianola, and from there to Fort Esperanza, opposite 
DeCrow s Point, on Matagorda Island. From this place it sailed to New Orleans, arriving at 
that city on the 21st of April, 1864. 

The regiment remained in New Orleans only two days, and was then sent up the river to 
Alexandria to re-enforce General Banks s army, just returned from his disastrous expedition into 
the Red River country. It arrived at Alexandria April 26th and was immediately sent to the 
front, where the enemy was met and engaged in several skirmishes. In these the regiment lost 
some men. Returning to Alexandria five companies were detailed to assist in building a dam 
across Red River to enable the gunboats to reach the Mississippi River. 

About the 15th of May the Sixteenth Ohio, with the rest of the forces under General Banks, 
commenced the retreat to Morganza, Louisiana, on the Mississippi. Morganza was reached 
without loss and the regiment went into camp. In this camp it remained, performing garrison- 



( SIXTEENTH Oino INFANTKY. 119 

duty, until the 6th of October, when orders were received to proceed to Columbus, Ohio, for final 
discharge from the service. 

This ended the service of the Sixteenth Ohio as an organized regiment, it having failed to 
re-enlist for the war from the fact that it was feared by the men that the regimental organization 
would not b"e preserved. 

The regiment reached Columbus, Ohio, on the 14th of October, and was paid and discharged 
from the service on the 31st of October, 18G3. 

During its service the Sixteenth traveled by railroad one thousand two hundred and eighiy- 
five miles; by steamboat three thousand six hundred and nineteen miles; by steamship twelve 
hundred miles, and on foot one thousand six hundred and twenty-one miles. No accident 
occurred to any one while traveling on the water or by cars. While on the Gulf of Mexico, in 
November, 1863, off the coast of Texas, in latitude 27, several of the men of the regiment had 
their feet frozen during the prevalence of a severe "Norther." 

The total number of deaths, from all causes, in the regiment was two hundred and fifty -one. 
There were killed in battle and died of their wounds two officers and sixty men. There was one 
death from suicide, and one from accidental shooting. Two men were drowned, one while bath 
ing in the Mississippi River, at Vicksburg ; the other while returning from general hospital at 
New Orleans, to rejoin his regiment at Morganza. 

There were one hundred and eighty-five deaths from disease, of which forty-seven occurred 
with the regiment. The others were in general hospital, or in hospital or other transports, at 
home on furlough, or in Rebel prisons. The number of wounded who recovered was one hun 
dred and eighty-eight. The largest per cent, sick at any one time occurred while the regiment 
was in barracks at Camp Dennison in 1861. The most fatal disease was typho-malarial, or camp 
fever. The most prevalent disease was diarrhea. 

There were two cases of small-pox and fifty-nine of varioloid, but no deaths. Of measies 
there were fifty-two cases and two deaths. There were three cases of typhoid-pneumonia, all of 
which proved fatal. Two died from diphtheria. The greatest mortality in any one month was in 
April, 1862, at Cumberland Ford, Kentucky, where there were eight deaths four from typhoid- 
malarial fever, two from typhoid-pneumonia, one from congestive measles, and one from hospital 
gangrene. 

On Surgeon s certificate of disability one hundred and eighty-six were discharged, and 
thirty-eight were transferred to the Veteran Ecserve Corps, fifteen of whom were directly from 
the regiment. Before leaving Morganza the recruits, ninety in number, were transferred to the 
One Hundred and Fourteenth Ohio to serve out the. unexpired term of their enlistment. 

The number of officers and men mustered out at the expiration of its term of service was 
four hundred and seventy-seven, all that was left of one thousand one hundred and ninety-one, 
the total of original organization and recruits. 



120 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



17th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


JOHN M. COXXELL 
FRANCI^ B POND 



























May 6 IWl 


3Iay 


6, 1SH1 






T. G. CLEVELAND 


" 4, " 




4, 




Captain 


A. H. Giesv 


April 22. " 


April 


22, 




Bo. 

Do 


Homer Thrall 
Thomas Acton 


" 24, " 
24, " 




24, 

22, 




Do 


Charles \ Baker 


" 2"), " 


1 


2", 




1)0 .. .. 


Lynian H. Jackson 




" 


27, 




Do 


J W Stinehcomb 


. i 2*> * 


** 


2 




Do 




May l , " 


Mav 


l) * 




I) 


Wm II Flovd 


17, 




17, 




Do 




April 2. 5, 


April 


23, 




Do 




17, 




17, 












22, 




Do. 


Henrv C. Knoop 


2-1 , 


" 


24, 




Do. 
Do 


D. 8. Deland 
Samuel H Baker 


i r,^ 1 4 


it 


25] 4 




Do 


W II Free 


* <>- k 


i 4 


27, 




Do 




22! " 


44 


22, 




Do 


Daniel Tavlor 


Miv 1, " 


^lav- 


1, 




Do 


\inos A Whisson 


\pfil 26 " 


April 


26, 




Do. 
Do 


Preston R. Galloway 






17* * 




Do 


\ J l>avis 


1 








Do. 


Charles X. Gouldin- 


May 1.% " 
\pril 22 " 


Mav 

April 


!;), 




Do 




24 




24, 




Do. 


0. E. Davis 


22, " 


44 






Do 




2."> 


44 


2") 




Do 


Benj S Schirlev 




44 






Do. 


J. C. Watson 


" 22 " 


44 


2V 




Do 




Mav ] " 


Mav 


1 




Do. 
Do 


Amos W. Ewing 
David J Roop 


April 2i>, " 
23 " 


April 


2ii, 




Do. 


Charles \V. Carroll 


" \1\ " 




17*, 





ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED 


REMARKS. 




J M CONNELL 


Aug. 

Ii 

May 

Aug. 

Dec. 

May 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
June 
Sept. 
Feb. 
\u rr 


16, 
13, 
20, 
31, 

9, 
17, 
31, 
15, 
9, 

12 
9, 

6. 

H] 

2] 


ISfil 

i.sr:; 

IShl 

1 stV* 

!;:;] 

1SC.2 

1 <\ > \ 

isr>4 

IStil 
1SC>5 

1.%] 
1S()2 


Dec. 

Feb. 
May 
Dec. 
March 
Jan. 
Mav 
Dec. 


28, 

2-! 

". , 
28, 
11, 
5, 
9, 
28, 


1H61 
L8T)3 

ISf.3 

1 - .I 

IM;I 
i sfis 

1864 
18(51 


Resigned November 12, 1863. 
Mustered out November 8, ISM. 
Promoted to Colonel 69th 0. V. I. Dec. 31, 62. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Absent when regiment was mustered out. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Died of wounds December 15, 1853. 
Resigned May 2, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Resigned. 
Resided May 30, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned January 18, 1S62. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Mustered out, 
Mustered out May 15, 1865. 
romoted to Major, 
i-omoted to Major, 
lesigned Juno 6, 1862. 
lesigned Auirust 4, 18C.2. 


Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
Do 


DURBIX WARD 
MARSHALL F. MOUUE 
DUKBIN WARD 
BENJ. SHOWERS 
DURUIN WARD 
BENJ. F. BUTTEUFIELD 
JAMES W. STINCHCOMB 
WILLIS G. CLARK 
WASHINGTON L. SCHENCK.... 


Do 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Do 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 


JONATHAN E. FOWLER 
D. D. BENEDICT 

E. SlNNETT 

HENRY J. HERUICK 


Jan. 
June 
Doc. 

Sept. 


.i, 
6, 
28, 
14, 
i 


\-<\.: 
IRfi2 


D. D. BENEDICT 

A. T. FlJLLERTON 

JAMES II. GARDNER 
Benj. F. Butterfield 
lames W. Stinchcoiul) 
loci Haines 
Cliarles 11. Riplev 


Feb. 
Sept, 
Jan. 

Aug. 

Sept. 


is] 

24, 
27, 
11, 
12, 

Hi 


181)3 

isi;i 

ISC,.", 
IStii 


S"pt. 
March 

Dec. 


5, 
27] 

> . 


ISfil 
I8fi3 
1861 


Do 
Do 




Nov. 

Jan. 
Juno 
Ausj. 


2ii, 
28, 
4, 
4, 
4, 

9, 

6, 

() 


1S(J2 


Jan. 
Oct. 

March 

Jan. 
Oct. 
March 


2S* 
28, 

28 ) 
28, 
9, 18C>2 
24, " 
3, " 
3, " 
3, " 
11, 18K3 
11, " 
23, " 
3D, " 
23. 1S64 


{esigned Mav <>, 1,-tH. 
lesi-ned April 25, 1864. 
designed October 27, 1863. 
Resigned August Hi. 18(i2. 
Resigned January 1, 18(52. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Died at Corinth Julv 21, 1S(>2. 
Resigned March 2, 1S63. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned May 30, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned. 
Unsigned September 0, 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out March 12. 1S65. 


Do 


Bonhain II. Fox 


Do 
Do. 


Amos A. Whisson 
Daniel M. Rea 


Do 
Do 
Do ... 
Do 


Ben.j. B. Gef/.endanner 
Bcnj. Showers 
Caleb B. Sharp 
Gilruth M. Webb 


Do 

Do. 


Willis G. Clark 
Emannel A. Richards 


July 

March 


IS, " 

21, " 
2, lSfi3 
31, " 
30, " 
. , " 
23. 1864 


Do 


Leo Nolcs 


Do 
Do 


Henrv Arney 
Daniel Sheet"* 


Aug. 

Sept. 

March 


E: ::::::::: 


John D. Innskeep 
Frank Spencer 



SEVENTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



121 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OK KANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Owen W. Brown 


March 

April 
May 


23, 
23, 
1, 

9, 


1864 


March 

April 
May 


23, 1864 
23, " 
1, " 
9, " 
9, " 
*), " 
27, " 
27, " 
20, 1865 

20J " 
IN " 
31, " 
28, 1861 
28, " 
28, " 


Revoked ; resigned as 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned April 24, 1865. 
Resigned July 5, 1805. 
Killed. 
Resigned July />, 18f,5. 
Mustered out July 16, 1865. 
Resigned May 2:>, 186;>. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned January 22, 1863. 
Promoted by President September 23, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Oliver B. Brandt 
Daniel Sullivan 
.lolm L. Ely 


Do 
Do 


Seth Collin* 
Thomas H. Thatcher..... 


June 
April 

May 
Aug. 

Sept. 

Nov. 
Jan. 

Feb. 

June 
Aug. 


2? , 

20, 
20, 
18, 
31, 
Ifi, 

2rij 

11, 

12, 

16, 
19, 

2(i, 

28, 
4, 

I, 
4, 

y, 

9, 
3. 
&\ 
ft, 
6, 
9, 
18, 


1865 

1861 
1862 


June 

April 

May 
Dec. 

Jan. 
Feb. 

May 
June 
Oct. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenai t 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
])o. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


-lames K. Wea kle> 
George ]" BHir 


Augustus Ward 


\Villiaiu H Walker 


John 15 Everiole 


James McDonald 


\.J. Davis 
BCMIJ. Showeis 


Jacob Humplm-vs 
Gilrnth 51. Webb 
rvin Linn 
Leo Noles 


28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28 J " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
9, 1862 
9, " 
3, " 

5, " 

24\ " 

3, " 

3, " 


Died December 21, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain August 9, 1S62. 
Resigned January 2. r >, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned Septembers, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned November 21, 18G1. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain 31arch 18, 1864. 
Resigned Mav 2. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 


1862. 


Daniel Sheets 
Frank Spencer 
Win Cook 


Willis G. Clark 
Henry Arn- V 
Owen W. Brown 
Joseph II Pool 


Caleb B. Sharp 
Oliver B. Brandt 
Daniel Sullivan 
John L. Elv 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Seth Collins 
^imuel H Hurd 


Dec. 


.">, 
26, 
2, 
30, 
*>S 


1861 
186" 
1 86-1 


March 

Jan. 
March 
Oct. 
March 

April 
May 


I*!, 186.", 
11, " 
11, " 
2:?, 
23, 1864 
30, 1863 
23, 186-1 
23, " 
23, " 
23, " 
1, " 
" 


Promoted to Captain. 
)eclined promotion. 
Resigned November 4. 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned September 21, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Honorably discharged July 8, 1864. 
Resigned November 3, 1S64. 
Declined promotion. 
Deceased June 15, 1864 


S Austin Thayer 


March 
May 
March 


Thomas II. Thatcher.... 


Levi Cornwall.-.. 


Jacob M. Kuirner.... 


Sept. 
March 

April 
May 


23 
23, 
23, 

- "> , 
1, 
9, 


James F. Weakley 
Isaiah 31. Daniels 


George E. Blair 
i. L. Simpson 


Oliver Kibbv 
Kit-hard Foster 


Lyman W. Barnes 
Augustus \\ ard 
Win. H. Walker 


June / 27, " 


I une 




Killed. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 


lames Strode 


July 2"., " 


July 


I 1 ,! " 


Resigned December 31, 1864. 


lames Outcault 


Oct. 


6, 
6, 


" 


Oct. 


6, " 

6, " 


Mustered out with regiment. 
designed June 12, 1865. 


Patrick Wilson 


Daniel S. Bird 


April 
May 
Aug. 

Sept. 




IS 1 "*") 

1861 


April 
May 
Dec. 


20, 1865 
20, " 
20, " 
18, " 
18, " 

31, " 

28, 1861 
28, " 
28, " 
2s, " 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment, 
flustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
> roinoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
lesigned June 6, 1862. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant August 9, 
iesigned July 21, 1862. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
tesigned April 1, 1862. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
lesigned August 15, 1862. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Allen Tittler 


2(s 
20 
18, 
18, 

2(1, 
11, 

16\ 


Joseph .James 
James E. Larimer 
John E Lain- 


Malcome 1). Lane 
Henry Arnev 


Joseph II Pool 


Henrv DC war 


Theodore Michaels 
John L Elv 


Nov. 

Tan. 
Feb. 

April 
June 

July 
Aug. 


26, 
28, 
4-, 

4, 
4, 
9, 
3, 

I . , 
1, 
fi, 

21 1 
15, 


1862 


Jan. 

Feb. 

May 
lune 

July 
Oct. 


28, " 
28, " 
2.s, " 
28, " 
28, " 
9, 1862 
3, 
1 J, 
1, 
24, 
M, 
3, 
3, 


Theodore ( Stewart 


Win H Ea Me 


Seth Collins 


S Austin Thii ver 


Win. 11. Push 
Oliver B. Brandt 
J homas 11. Thatcher 
John I). Inskeeep 


Emannel A. Richards 
Levi Cornwall 
Jacob M. Uu tVner 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


aiah M. Daniels 


Sept. 


18, 
10, 

3 


; 


Dec 


s l " 

30 " 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


George E. Blair 
L. L. Simpson 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do, 
Do. 
I) () . 


George Kainey 
Alfred St. John 
Oliver Kibbv 
Richard Foster 
.vman W. Barncw 
Anirustus Ward 
Win. 11. Walker 


March 
Dec. 
May 
Nov. 
Dec. 
March 
Dec. 


"1, 

so, 
u! 

9, 

H, 


1863 

186-1 
1863 


March 

April 
1 nne 
Jan. 
March 


11, 1863 

23, 
9, 18<Vi 
15, " 
9, " 
14, " 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
lesigned .March 30, 1864. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Jnhn B. Evcrsole 
.James Strode 
Edward Champlin 


April 
May 


H, 
11, 
11, 
13, 
9, 


1864 


April 
May 


11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
13, " 

9, 
9, " 

27i " 
27, " 


J romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


James Ontcault 
Pat. Wilson . . 


John Matlock 


Daniel S. Bird 
Allen Tittler 


Juno 


2?] 
27, 


" 


Juno 






122 OHIO IN THE WAR. 



SEVENTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTHY. 



THE nucleus of this regiment was an organization of thirty-two men, raised under the 
militia law of Ohio, at Lancaster, Ohio, commanded by Joseph A. Stafford. Four 
days after the attack on Sumter, Captain Stafford had filled his company to the required 
number of one hundred men, and started by cars via Zanesville for Columbus, arriving there the 
next day. They were assigned as company A, First Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

Sergeants Theodore Nichols and A. II. Geisy and private J. W. Stinchcomb were detailed as 
recruiting officers, with orders to return to Fairfield County and recruit another company. By the 
20th of April one hundred and eighty-five men had been recruited, and on the 27th two com 
panies, instead of one, were organized, Sergeant Geisy being elected Captain of one and private 
Stinchcomb Captain of the other. 

The second call of the President on Ohio for twenty-three regiments found these two com 
panies in camp on the Fair Grounds, near Lancaster, Ohio. They were at once made the nucleus 
of the Seventeenth Eegiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for the three months service. In a few 
days Captain Acton, of Madison County, Captain Haynes, of the same county, Captain Lyman 
Jackson, of Perry County, Captain Charles A. Baker, of Hocking County, Captain Frank F. 
Pond, of Morgan County, Captain Stone, of Mercer County, Captain Tin-all, of Licking, and 
Captain Tallman, of Belmont County, each reported with a company, and organized the regiment 
by electing the field officers. 

On the 20th of April the regiment was placed on board the cars at Zanesville for Bellaire, 
and on arriving at Benwood, on the Ohio River opposite Bellaire, a large fleet of boats were found 
in waiting to receive troops. On the morning of the 23d, all the troops and baggage being aboard 
the boats, the fleet steamed down the Ohio River, and arrived at Marietta on Sunday afternoon, 
where it lay until the next morning, and then started for Parkersburg, and in a few hours were on 
Virginia soil. 

The Seventeenth was at once brigaded with the Ninth and Tenth Ohio, General "William S. 
Rosecrans commanding the brigade. Its first duty was to guard trains to Clarksburg, Virginia, 
and return. Company F was sent to guard two trains loaded with provisions to Clarksburg, "West 
Virginia, and return. Companies A and B were detailed as guard to General McClellan. Com 
panies I, F, G, and K, were sent down the river on an expedition, under charge of Major Steele, with 
sealed orders, not to be opened until Blennerhassett s Island was passed. One company was put 
off at Larue, West Virginia, and the other two proceeded on down to Ripley Landing, and crossed 
over by land to Ripley, the county seat of Jackson County. Both detachments were to operate 
against the guerrillas of the different localities. The two Wises, father and son, were operating in 
that part of Virginia, and made their boasts that they would "annihilate the Yankees on sight." 
They, how r ever, took good care to keep within safe running distance of the aforesaid "Yankees." 
O. Jennings Wise had tried "cleaning out" the two companies of the Seventeenth stationed near 
Ravenswood, but had ignominiously failed. The old Wise, feeling outraged that his son had not 
brought back with him the two companies of Yankees, swore he would bring them himself. A 
young lady of the neighborhood of Charleston, Virginia, being advised by a mulatto boy of Wise s 



SEVENTEENTH Oino INFANTRY. 123 

intentions, on the evening of the 1st of July started on horseback for Ravens-wood, taking the 
by-roads and cow-paths to reach there. At daybreak next morning she notified Captain Stineh- 
comb of the impending danger, and before Wise reached Ravenswood a courier had arrived at 
Parkersburg, and re-enforcements were on the march from Lame, Virginia, Hockingport, and 
Gallipolis, Ohio. Governor Wise, hearing of these re-enforcements, retired to Riploy in the 
greatest haste, starting for that place at three o clock in the morning. 

The two companies remained at Ravenswood and garrisoned the place until the lOtk of July, 
when they were ordered to evacuate and report to the regiment at Buckhannon, Virginia, on the 
14th of July. The other five companies of the regiment, Colonel Connell commanding, left the 
railroad at Petroleum and marched across to Buckluinnon via Glenwood, at which place, <m the 
4th of July, they were surrounded by about fifteen hundred Rebels, but being well posted, held 
their position until re-enforced by the Tenth Ohio, Colonel Lytle. 

It was intended to have had the Seventeenth Ohio concentrated in time to participate in the 
battle of Rich Mountain, but, as it was thought a much better work was being performed in 
Jackson County by breaking up recruiting camps and preventing many from joining the Rebel 
ranks, it was not done. 

Shortly after the regiment was consolidated at Buckhannon, it was ordered on an expedition, 
in company with several other regiments, Colonel Tyler commanding, to Sutton, Virginia. 
After a long and very hard march, some days making thirty-three miles, Sutton was occupied 
and fortified. 

On the 3d of August, 1861, the Seventeenth Ohio, having overserved the time some days, 
started for home, arriving at Zanesville, Ohio, on the 13th of August, and was mustered out on 
the 15th. 

Efforts were immediately made to reorganize the regiment for three years, and on the 30th 
of August it assembled at Camp Dennison. 

The regiment drilled until the 30th of September, when it was ordered to Kentucky, and 
reportod at Camp Dick Robinson on the 2d of October, 1861. From thence it moved to Wild 
Cat, and was the first regiment to relieve Colonel Garrard, of the First Kentucky. The regi 
ment participated in the Wild Cat fight and lost seven men wounded. It was brigaded with the 
Thirty-First and Thirty-Eighth Ohio, General Albin Schcepf commanding. 

The Seventeenth Ohio also participated in the battle of Mill Springs, resulting in the defeat 
of General Zollicoffer. From this battle-ground the regiment marched to Louisville, Kentucky, 
and took boats for Nashville, Tennessee, where it arrived on the 3d of March, 1862. Thence 
across the country to Shiloh, but being detailed to guard the wagon train through, did not reach 
the ground in time to take part in the battle. It participated in the siege of Corinth, and was 
engaged in several severe skirmishes, in one of which company B, \vith seventy men, penetrated 
the Rebel lines, drove the Rebel pickets on their reserves, and held the position for two hours, 
losing two men severely wounded, and four slightly. 

Thence the regiment marched to Booneville, Mississippi, in pursuit of the flying enemy ; 
then back via Corinth and luka to Tuscurnbia, Alabama, where it arrived on the 1st of July. 
From this place they joined and marched with Buell s army to Louisville, Kentucky. It was 
at the battle of Perryville but did not participate, though under fire in the rear of General 
Mitchel s command. From Danville and Lebanon, Kentucky, the backward march of the army 
was commenced, the Seventeenth accompanying. 

At the battle of Stone River the brigade to which the regiment was attached was stationed 
on the extreme right until the 20th of December, when, after night, it marched from Nolinsville 
to the Murfreesboro Pike, and next day had a severe skirmish with Wheeler s cavalry at 
Lavergne, recaptured all the mules Wheeler had taken from our train, and saved about two 
hundred wagons from being burned. The regiment went into the battle-line on the Stone River 
field about one o clock on the 31st of December, and with its brigade charged the Rebel General 
Hanson s brigade, drove them in confusion, killing their General, and some one hundred and 
fifty of the rank and file. The loss of the Seventeenth was twcntv wounded. 



124 OHIO IN THE WAE. 

After the long rest at Murfreesboro , General Eosecrans inaugurated the Tullahoma cam 
paign. The Seventeenth moved with its brigade, and at Hoover s Gap, under the command of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Durbin Ward, charged the Seventeenth Tennessee Eebel regiment, strongly 
posted in a belt of woods. In making this charge the Seventeenth Ohio was compelled to cross 
an open field, and receive a full fire directly in its left flank from a Eebel brigade and battery. 
Yet the regiment went steadily on, drove the Seventeenth Tennessee, and occupied their posi 
tion. This charge was executed with such coolness and determination as to draw the particular 
attention of General Thomas. 

At the battle of Chickamauga the regiment was on the extreme right of the center, attached 
to the corps commanded by General Thomas. When General Wood s division was double- 
quicked out of the line, the gap left exposed the right flank of the regiment, of which the Eebels 
immediately took advantage, and opened fire both on the right flank and front, causing it to lose 
heavily, and scattering the men in confusion. Company B, being the only one of the regiment 
that retreated in a body, was halted about three hundred yards from where they had been driven, 
gave three cheers, sounded the rally for the Seventeenth Ohio, gathered some two hundred of 
them together, and charged back on the enemy, but to little purpose, as the Eebels outnumbered 
them ten to one. Falling back again, now only about one hundred strong, they held a given 
point, and fought throughout that memorable day, leaving the field with but fifty-two men. The 
loss of the Seventeenth in this battle in killed and wounded was over two hundred, not counting 
those with slight flesh wounds. This was the severest fight in which the regiment had partici 
pated. The gallant Captain Eicketts fell dead in the early part of the fight, and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Ward fell about the middle of the afternoon, on the front line, badly wounded. During 
the siege of Chattanooga the Seventeenth was in several severe skirmishes, and at the Brown s 
Ferry coup de main it won honor along with the brigade to which it was attached. At Mission 
Eidge, though in the rear line at the start, the regiment was in the front when the top of the 
hill was gained. In this brilliant charge the brave and gallant Major Butterfield fell mortally 
wounded, while leading the regiment. Captain Benjamin Showers, next in rank, completed the 
charge. The regiment captured a Eebel battery and turned the guns on the retreating enemy. 

Captain Stinchcomb about this time returned from a leave of absence in Ohio, and being the 
ranking officer, took command of the regiment. General Bragg s late head-quarters on Mission 
Eidge was occupied by the regiment for some time. 

On the 1st of January, 1864, the subject of re-enlisting as veterans having been agitated, 
three hundred and ninety-three members of the Seventeenth agreed to embark if necessary in 
another three years campaign, and on the 22d of January the regiment started home on fur 
lough. On the 7th of March it returned to the field, with an addition to its ranks of over four 
hundred men. Colonel W T ard, though still suffering from his wound, and compelled through the 
entire Atlanta campaign to wear his arm in a sling, resumed command of the regiment. It took 
only a subordinate part in the heavy skirmishing at Eocky Face Eidge, but on the 13th of May 
bore its full share in the battle of Eesaca. An assault having been ordered, it moved forward 
with Turchin s brigade until, unsupported on either right or left, it could go no further. It still, 
however, held the position it had gained until the commanding General decided to abandon the 
attack on the enemy s works at that point, Its loss here was quite heavy. 

Skirmishes, that were half battles, continued almost daily; and in those at New Hope 
Church, Pumpkin Vine Creek, and several other places, the Seventeenth was actively engaged. 
One of these skirmishes, coining on the 18th of June, was long remembered in the regiment as 
"Waterloo" the drenching rain in which they fought having quite as much to do, in their 
minds, with the name as the anniversary. 

At Kenesaw Mountain the regiment suffered less than it had in previous actions of less im 
portance; but the heat was so intense that many men were carried off, prostrated by sun-stroke. 

At the battle of Peach Tree Creek, July 20th, the regiment was actively engaged. The 
heaviest fighting was further to the left, but the Seventeenth lost two officers and several privates. 

Moving with Jeff. C. Davis s corps to the rear of Atlanta, the Seventeenth was among the 



SEVENTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 125 

claimants for the honor of having been first to strike the railroad. The next day Hunter s 
brigade formerly Turchin s in which the Seventeenth had been placed throughout the cam 
paign, sustained Este s, and advanced under a galling fire of musketry and artillery to the 
assault on Jonesboro . This ended the campaign. 

Colonel Ward s wounded arm having become worse, he feared the effects of exposure through 
the winter, and now resigned; although he afterward acted as volunteer aid on Schofield s staff 
at the battle of Nashville. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Showers had just escaped from a Rebel prison in time to assume the 
command, and lead the regiment, with the rest of Sherman s army, "Down to the Sea." The 
Seventeenth saw very little more fighting which, after its past experience, it could call severe. It 
followed Sherman through the Carolinas, took part in the battle of Bentonville, passed in review 
before the President at Washington, and was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, in July, 18G5. 

One-half of the Seventeenth was raised in Fail-field County; three of its companies belonged 
in the Miami Valley. It was in the service from the beginning of the war. It was always at 
the front never doing a single day s service in mere garrison duty. It served under -nearly all 
the most famous commanders McClellan, Buell, Rosecrans, Thomas, Grant, Halleck, Sherman, 
and Sehofield. It held an honorable place from the first in that noted corps, Thomas s Fourteenth. 
And it was never driven, save at Chickamauga. Even then it quit the field only under order?, 
and at nightfall. 



126 



OHIO IN THE WAE. 



18th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF KAXK. COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 
Surgeon 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
2d Lieutenant 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


TIMOTHY E. STANLEY. 
WM. 31. BOLLF.S 

\VJI. II. BlSBLK 
A. S. SWARTZWELDEK 

W. H.DKIUY 
THOMAS L. NF.AL 
Henry C. Rogers 
Frank Buell 
C. Kingsbury 
J. W. Caidwell 
John P Alcrriil 


May 

June 
April 

Mav 
April 

May 

April 


29, 1861 

12, | 
2l! 

~o 
so, | 

24, 

22, " 
24, || 

3u ! " 


May 

June 
April 

May 

April 


29, 1851 

29, " 

12, " 
12, 
21, 
23, 
20, 
30, 

25 " 

30, " 


Resigned. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Adjutant. 
Quartermaster. 


11. L. Curtiss 
C. C. Avlsliirc 
J. L. Wallace 
John J. llotVman 
John McMahon 


Win. Bolle.s 


23^ " 


April 
J un<> 
April 


22 " 
2s " 
23, " 


John V. Keep-rs 
Dennis U Leary 


April 

May 

April 

May 


20, " 
30, || 

22, 


May 
April 


20, " 
30, " 


H. S. Haniiitun 
Haslcy C. Burr 


S W It oss 


25 1 

30, 


Mav 


25, 

30, 

7, 

l , " 
1, " 
23, 
20, 
30, | 


Davi.l Dove 
Thomas Ho-;* 




April 
J une 


22, | 

~i 

1, " 
23, 

20, 
30, 
24, 
22, 


April 
Jiine 

April 

May 
April 


H. 8. Sji.-ur 
\le\ Pearc.- 


J. C. Paxton " 
John McMahon ! April 
Win H Bisbee ! " 


H S Spear 


May 

April 


Alex. Pearce 
Warren G. Hubbard 
Wni. McCain 
George It. Hibben 
J. W. Jenkins 
John Andrews 
0. 11. P. Scott 
George E. Downing 
Joshua Mathiot 
D. B. Caldwell 
Wallace Hill 
Silas E. Einmons 


May 
April 
June 

July 


25, 

30, " 

2s , " 
is, " 
22, 


Mav 
April 
June 

July 


24, | 
30, | 

is | 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



KAXK, 


NAME. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. 


SSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do. .... 
Do 


TIMOTHY R. STANLEY. 
CHAS. H.GROSVENOR... 

JOSIAH GlVKX 


Aiur. n, iwj 
April s, S(>;, 
Aug. 17, <fl 
March 10, IN;:I 
April >, :fl 
Juiv 3o. 861 
March li., M:; 
F.-b. 1, srr, 
April 8, " 
Sept. 24, 8-;j 


Aug. 
April 
Nov. 
June 
April 
J uly 
March 

Feb. 

April 


0, LSG1 
8, lSi ,5 
2, 18(11 
15, 18C.3 

S, ISC,. , 

3o, IStq 
16, 1SI53 

1, 1SC.5 

22, l.V.l 


Mustered out November 0, 1864. [27, 18f>5. 
Mn duty as Prov. Marsh. Gen. of Ga. until Oct. 
Appointed Colonel 74th Regiment. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 


( HAS. H. GKOSVK.NOU 

JOHN M. BKXKIUCT 


Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Ass t Surg.-on 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 


J M WFiru 


.lonx M. BF.XKIHCT 

RollKKT B. CllAPlT.1.1 

WM. P.JOHNSON 


MOUACE P. KAY 
\\ M. W. 3liLi,s 
; HAS. H. KKKX..-H 
Airnu Ji C. XEWKLI 
SAMTKL A. BAXTKU 
JOHN DILI. ON 
ll -nrv il Mill.-r 


Feb. L O, Mi. , 
>. pt. 24, Sl il 

ian. 1, Mi. 5 

Mav 2. si , ) 

Mi.v 2-.i; " 

S"pt. 1C,, l.M ,1 

Aug. 1, 
10, 

S-pt. . 

" I S, 


^ 
Jan. 

M ay 




22, Iv .l 
: ), I>C,3 

29, " 

2.">, isr.i 


K -signed F bruarv 2S 1864. 
Mustered o it November 9, 1864. 
Mustered O it October 9, 1S65. 
Mustered o it OrtohT 9, 1865. 
Must-red o it November 9, 1SC4. 
Resigned J nuiirv 19, lsi)3. 
Died April 14. isc,3. 
"romoted to Major. 
lesisned October 4, 1S63. 
Resigned September 18, 1862. 


jio 


\sb--l l- eiiton 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do , 
Do 
Do 


J. M.Wi-lch 

i).-ivid n. .Miles."!! .!!."!!!! . .!!!. 


J ll .iila (. . M dman 


Nov. "l , 
4, 




Died of wounds .lamiarv 4, 1863. 
Must-red o it November 9, 1801. 
Resigned Mav 2C>. 1; 63. 



EIGHTEENTH Omo INFANTRY. 



12 



RANK. 


NAME. IJATK OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. nF.MAUKS. 


Captain Win. L. Edm 
Do Ehenex.erGro 

DO! !!!!!!!!! ciiaV. w. MI- 
DO i.l. C. McElro 
Do !(ieo. W. Dun 
Do ( has. A. Cal 
Do Homer C. Jo 
Do \rnos C. Rovf 
Di earlv C. Bn 


iston 
svenor 

self.!!!. !!!!!!!!!!! 
do!."!!"!!!!!!!!!!! 


Nov. 5, 1*61 
Aug. 30, " 
Sept. IS, " 
Jan. 4, 1863 

.March 2o| " 
April 11, " 
March If,, || 

(>t i t - "* I! 

June *, 1*04 

Sept. 3(1, 1*04 

Dec. 21, || 


Nov. 
Dec. 

Feb. 

March 
June 
Aug. 
Juno 

Jan. 
Juno 


9! 

18, 
18, 

15, 

1, 

23, 
23, 


1861 
L862 

1863 
1864 


Resigned August 30, 1*02. 
Killed December 15, 1*04. 
Mustered out November 9, l.64. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 

Mustered out November 9, 1*64. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Resigned October 4, 1*63. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Promoted to Major. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Honorably discharged March 25, 1*65. 
A bsent, per spec l order, at muster-out of reg t. 
Promoted to Major. 


)\VU 


Do 
Ik 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


George W. (Mark 
David 11. Miles 
JohnB. Kmo-y 
George Collintrs 
iobert B. Chappcll 


(Mias. (irant. 
( has. J. Phill 
Daniel M.Ba 
Travis Lvnel 


ips::::::::::::!::::: 


Jan. 20, 1865 
Feb. Id, " 
Id, li 
March 2 .-, 
April 8, 
12, 
|| 12, 

May ll| 

Aug. 1, IN . I 


Jan. 

Feb. 

Marcl 
April 

May 

Nov. 


0, 
j, 

\ t 

8, 
12, 
12, 
12, 
11, 
22, 


1865 
1861 


Declined promotion. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Absent without leave at muster-out of reg t. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Cashiered Octob-r 11, 1*65. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Resigned September 26, 1862. 




DO! !!!!!!!!! 

Do 

DO! !!!!!!!!! 

Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
o. 

o! 

o 

1$ 

Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Li -ntenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do"! 


.Milton W. 11 
Nelson MeCo 
Win. S. Wan 
Thomas C. SI 
Henrv Carr.. 
James F. 11. 
l-viix McNei 
Geo. W. Dun 
John C. Neal 
Alex. W. S. 3 
J. C. MeKlro 
Robert R. Da 
Nelson 11. Ya 
JacobC. Fros 
Chas. W. Me 


cldon 

i. .". ! 


de 

linear 
v 
nford 
n Vorhes 
t 
Neill 


|| Id, || 

Sept. ~2, " 
" 8, " 
|| 13, | 

" 2 1 1 
Oct. It , 

Nov. 2 5| ^ 
Feb. 3, 1*02 


Feb. 


ii| 

20, 

6, 
6, 
IS, 


1863 


Promoted to Captain. 
Dismissed bv order of W. D. June 16, 1862. 
Resigned July 9, 1S63. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned Januarv 17, 1862. 
Resigned Auirust 15, 1*62. 
Resigned Februarys, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned March 15, 1S62. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned February s, 1863. 


Ili-nn. 31. Be 
(Mias. A. Cabl 
Kbeliey.er Cro 
Wm. B. Willi 


rkstresser 

svenor 
ims 


Frederick J. 
Robert iiavii 
Pea rl v (;. Br 
Johii M. Ben 
Amos C. Rove 
Homer C. Jo 
Geo. W. Ciar 
John C. Ban 


Ryan 

)wn 

diet 


*C ^ : : 

*P : $ :; 


Nov. 
Dec. 

Feb. 


Resigned April 1, 1864. 
Resigned June 14, 1S03. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned September 20, 1S64. 


ton 


V 

on 


Jan. 4, " 
March 20, " 


Feb. 

June 


John (i. llonnold 
John H. Acton 


Feb! 1, " 
Jan. 9, " 


July 
Juno 


20, 


" 


Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Discharged March 2.*, 1864. 


\\ m. B. Evans 
Charles E. Stevens 
Clias. (Jr:int 


Juno is, " 
Id, " 
March 10, " 
April 14, " 
Aug. IS, " 
Oct. 4, " 
17, " 
April 13, 1ST.4 
July i2, " 

Nov. 15, " 
Dec. 21, 1 


July 

Aug. 

Jan. 
Nov. 
April 
July 

Nov. 
Dec. 


20, 
1, 
1, 
1, 
19, 
4, 
27, 
13, 
12, 
12, 
15, 
21, 
21, 
21, 


1864 
1863 
1864 


Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Resigned September 16. 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Resigned October 17, 1*03. 
Resigned Fcbruarv, 1*04. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
({signed February 20, 1S05. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Declined promotion. 
Killed December 15, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Chas. M. (. n 
Theodore- Fei 
David B. Car 
Svlvanus Bai 
Charles J. PI 
David J. Seal 
John M. Cros 
John M.Gros 
Samuel W. T 
Daniel M. Ba 
Travis Lynch 
Nelson McCo 
Win. S. Wan 
Thomas C. SI 
Milton W. 11 
Daniel Kmor 
IL-nrv Can-., 
( has. R. Wil 
Robert S. Ki 
John G. G. C 
D. S. Shellen 
Jas. G. Irwii 
Wm. 11. Erne 
Benj. F. havi 
John Mr-Man 
( has. W. Sta 
Jerome F. Fr 
Isaac A. Shal 
James F. H. 
Wm. II. Hol( 
James 11. II; 


V| 


in.... 

tlett 


illips 


venor 
venor 
liomas 
tes 

v 
eldon .".! .! 


" 21, " 


" 


21 1 


1865 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Absent at muster-out of regiment. 
Traus red to Adjutant l.-th O.V. I. Sept. 1, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned July 11. lN ,5. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Discharged Jnlv 2. 1*05. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
R-siirned November 2s, 1*02. 




Jan. 2d, ISio 
" 2d 
Feb. Id, " 
March 29, | 

April % , 
12, 


Jan. 

Feb. 
31 arch 

April 
May 


20, 
20, 
10, 

29| 

8, 
12 
12, 

12, 
4, 


^inson 


rte r 






fl 


" 12, 
12, 
12, 
" 12, 
May 2, 

>.-pt. .), 










look 


.ness 


Amos ( . Ro\ 
Wm. B. Will 
Samuel II. M 
Win. W. lilai 
Wm. B. Shir 
. ohn C. Ban- 
Win. 11. Bail 
Charles (i. B 
Alexander P( 
Henrv II. Wi 
Chas. B. Sam 
Chas. M. Gn 
Chas. E. Stev 
Edward iMcL 


Stoll 

jams 
irtin. 


Sept. ~*| 
19, 
(Jet 14 


{ 


22, 
22* 


T 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned January *, 1>02. 
Killed December 31, 1*02. 
R. -signed Auirust. 1*02. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned September 20, 1*02. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned November 3d. 1S62. 

Resigned September -It, 1*02. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned August 5, 1.--63. 


ker . 




" 21, 

Nov. "l| 
1, 
Jan. 21,1S02 
Feb. 3, || 

March 1.% " 
Nov. 29, " 
Sept. 20, " 


Jan. 

Feb. 

April 

Nov. 
Dec. 


22 

3i 

19, 

1", 
29, 
9, 




1 . . 


ild win 
iVh 


ders 

bb 


ns 


areu 



128 



OHIO IN THE WAR 



2d Lieutenant Chas 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



.Grant 

Lorenzo D. Carter 

Wm. B. Evans 

David B. C arlin 

John H. Acton 

John G. HonnoM 

Theodore Ferrell 

David J. Seabright 

Chas. J.Phillips 

Sylvanus Uartlett 

John M. Grosvenor 

Rnssi-!l S. Carpenter.. 

Win. Qnigley 

John 1 . Camp 

Travis Lyneli 

Cooi-jre Hewitt 

Daniel M. Bates 

Daniel Emory 

Henry (, arr 

Jas. G. Irwin 

Win. H. Emerick 

Robert S. King 

David A. Piatt 

John G. G. Carter 

D. 8. Shelleabarger.... 

Benj. F. Davis 

John McManus 

Chas. W. Stan near t 

Jerome F. Fry 

[saac A. Shat er 

Wm. H. Holdeness 

James F. H. Cook 

Jonathan W. Pontius. 
Win. A. Davidson.. ..... 

David T. Shotts 

Samuel L. Clark 

uel Charles 

David W. Bost 

Caleb Richmond 

Henry Klabish 

Peter Gutherell 

James W. Slater 

John A. Miller 

ieorge P. Jarvis 

ieorge W. Kearus , 



DATE OF RANK. 



Sept. 
Nov. 

Sept. 
Dec. 

Tune 
April 

Feb. 
Nov. 

Dec. 
June 
July 

Dec. 



Feb. . 
April 



May 



Sept. 



1 i 



8,1 
12, 
12, 
21, 

21, 

2ll 

21, 

21, 

21, 

21, 

10, 1 

10, 

8, 

8, 

8, 

8, 
12, 
12, 
12, 

2. 

2, 

2 

2, 

2, 
18, 
31, 

I, 



COM. ISSUED. 



Dec. 



Jan. 
Feb. 



3 June 
Aug. 
July 



Feb. 

:; March 



20, 1803 
31 , 
23, 



23, 
1, 
20, 

20, 

li>. 1SI J 



4 June 
July 



April 



S,pt 



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned January : 2, 1804. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant* 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
" romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 
Mustered out November 9, 1864. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
\ever mustered. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
" romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Itt-siinied June 12, I80. r >. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Declined to accept commission. 
Declined to accept commission. 
Resigned July 28, 1805. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 



EIGHTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 

FIRST ORGANIZATION. 



THE organization of this regiment was commenced at Camp Wool, Athens, Ohio, in 
August, 1861, and completed at Camp Dennison, November 4, 1861. The regiment, 
nine hundred and thirty strong, left Camp Dennison November 6, 1861, and reported 
to General W. T. Sherman, at Louisville, the next day. Thence it marched down the river to 
West Point. On the 15th it reported at Elizabethtown, and was organized into a brigade com 
prising the Nineteenth Illinois, Eighteenth Ohio, Thirty-Seventh Indiana, and Twenty-Fourth 
Illinois, under command of Colonel Turchin, Nineteenth Illinois, General O. M. Mitchel s 
division of the Army of the Ohio. Remaining at Elizabethtown about a month, the division 
marched thence to Bacon Creek, where, for nearly two months, the command was instructed and 
drilled under the eye of General Mitchel. 

On February 7th General Mitchel commenced in earnest his brilliant progress; he passed 
General McCook at Green River, encamped on its south bank, and on the 8th marched for Bowl 
ing Green, occupied in force by the enemy. On the night of the 9th the regiment for the first 
time bivouacked, and on the morning of the 10th showed hillocks of men covered with snow. 
The day the regiment reached the vicinity of Bowling Green, the place was reported deserted by 
the Rebels, and the bridge and public stores in flames. A difficulty in crossing the river was 



EIGHTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 129 

overcome by the ingenuity of Colonel Stanley, who detailed a number of men, and quickly con 
structed a bridge. The brigade marched down the banlc, and, silently, that snowy night, the 
crossing was made, and at daylight Colonel Turchin, with his command, inarched into Bowlim r 
Green. Large quantities of supplies and subsistence were captured, but more had been destroyed. 

On February 23d General Mitchel moved for Nashville, sixty -two miles distant, reaching it 
in three days. Here, as at Bowling Green, the Fourth Ohio Cavalry preceded the inVantry, and 
found the railroad bridge and the fine suspension bridge over the Cumberland River destroyed, 
but means of crossing were soon found and the City of Nashville was taken. The whole National 
army, under General Buell, encamped in and around the city. 

General Mitchel s command being an independent one, that officer, March 18th, marched for 
Huntsville, Alabama, taking possession of the country as he passed. This bold and timely 
movement surprised the Rebels, who fell back as the National troops advanced. The whole 
country, from Nashville to Huntsville, and the railroad east to Bridgeport and west to Tuscumbia, 
were taken by a single division of less than seven thousand men. The railroads, bridges, and turn 
pikes, injured by the Rebels in their flight, were repaired, rendering the campaign very arduous. 
To the Michigan Engineers mainly belongs the credit of overcoming the difficulties in crossing 
bridgeless streams. The bridge over Stone River, two hundred and sixty feet long, was rebuilt In 
eight days, by a detail from the Eighteenth Ohio, with axes only. 

On April 10th at midnight the command arrived within ten miles of Huntsville. A council 
of war was held at General Mitchel s head-quarters, and the plan of the capture of Huntsville 
decided upon. At three o clock A. M. the command marched, and was in sight of Huntsville 
before the citizens were out of their beds. Some three hundred prisoners were captured, seven 
teen locomotives, one hundred and fifty cars, and large amounts of supplies. The Eighteenth 
Ohio, with other forces, were detailed to work the railroad and transport troops and supplies. 

Tuscumbia was occupied, and Colonel Turchin, the brigade commander, with a small force, 
including the Eighteenth Ohio, made his head-quarters in the town, although almost surrounded 
by Rebel troops. Strategy was resorted to to deceive them as to the strength of the National forces. 
Names of officers from some dozen regiments were entered on the hotel books, whose regiments 
were supposed to be in camp, but an inspection would have found but six hundred men there. 
Colonel Stanley was careful not to let any citizens leave. General Buell ordered all west of 
Decatur evacuated, and the regiment was sent to Athens to guard the railroad. 

On May 1st, at daylight, Colonel Stanley s pickets were attacked by Scott s Rebel cavalry, 
six hundred strong and three pieces of artillery, yet the Rebels were held in check for three 
hours. Colonel Stanley, learning that the Rebels consisted of three battalions of infantry, 
ordered a retreat toward Huntsville. While the Eighteenth was yet in Decatur General Mitchel 
came from Huntsville to Decatur on the cars, and ordered Colonel Stanley to fall back in good 
order to a point where re-enforcements would be met. General Mitchel came near being captured, 
as the Rebels sent a small force across to a bridge, setting it on fire, but the General and his 
train ran over it while burning. At this bridge a spirited fight occurred, in which six Rebels 
were killed and a number wounded. The regiment lost three killed and several wounded. 

On May 31st the Eighteenth joined the brigade at Fayetteville, and marched thence, under 
General Negley, for Chattanooga. The town was bombarded from the north side of the river, 
by which it was believed the Rebels were deterred from a contemplated invasion of Kentucky. 
The distance marched in this movement was two hundred and forty miles, accomplished in twelve 
days, crossing Cumberland Mountain and Walden s Ridge. 

From Fayetteville the regiment marched to Huntsville, thence to Stevenson and Battle 
Creek, where the Rebels were confronted ; the Tennessee River being between the forces. The 
regiment built fortifications and remained at Battle Creek until July llth, when it and half. of 
the Twenty-Fourth Illinois, all under command of Colonel Stanley, marched across Cumberland 
Mountain, arriving at Decherd after midnight of the day in which General Forrest had captured 
Murfreesboro . The Eighteenth next moved to Elk River, and along the railroad to Cowan; 
thence to Tullahoma and Manchester, and guarded the road from Tulluhoma to McMinnville. 

VOL. II. 9. 



130 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

On August 29, 1862, companies A and I of the Eighteenth Ohio, and D of the Ninth Mich 
igan, under command of Captain Miller, Eighteenth Ohio, were attacked at a stockade, twelve 
miles from Winchester, by Forrest, who dismounted nine hundred of his men before making the 
attempt. The Eebels were soon repulsed, losing about one hundred men without the loss of a 
man on our side. General Thomas complimented them in general orders. The Rebels having 
retreated a short distance, commenced destroying the railroad. Captain Miller sent a squad after 
them, but they were so badly whipped that they instantly decamped. 

The Eighteenth was the last regiment to leave Manchester with BuelPs retreating column. 
At Nashville the regiment was brigaded with the Sixty-Ninth Ohio, Eleventh Michigan, and 
Nineteenth Illinois, forming the Twenty-Ninth Brigade, under Colonel Stanley, and with another 
brigade, under Colonel Miller, was left for the defense of Nashville. Colonel Stanley commanded 
the brigade from September 10, 18G2, until after the battle of Chickamauga. 

The division in which the regiment was brigaded was the right of General Thomas s (Four 
teenth) corps at the battle of Stone River. On Tuesday, the 30th of December, 1862, the division 
took post south of the Cedar Woods and drove the Rebel sharpshooters from several points. 
Early Wednesday the right, under General McCook, gave way and, after a short struggle, in 
which the Twenty-Ninth Brigade vainly battled with the Rebel masses, it was compelled to do 
likewise. During this fearful time, at a critical moment, under the lead of General Rousseau^ 
the Eighteenth charged into the woods filled with Rebels, and checked their advance. 

Friday found the division on the extreme left. Breckinridge attacked and drove the division, 
thrown across Stone River, in great confusion. General Rousseau ordered Colonel Stanley to take 
his brigade across the stream. It was a fearful thing to do, but the order was executed by both 
brigades. Advancing a little, to closer cover, the men fell upon their faces, and awaited the ad 
vancing foe. On came the Rebels, but they were received with a leaden storm which thinned their 
ranks fearfully, and without giving them a chance to recover, an order to charge was given, 
which caused them to flee panic-stricken; meantime the artillery was doing its work. The bri 
gade captured four pieces of artillery. In this action of forty minutes Breckinridge acknowl 
edged the loss of one thousand seven hundred men. The Eighteenth lost Captains Fenton, 
Taylor, and Stivers, Lieutenant Blacker, and thirty-two men killed; Lieutenant-Colonel Given, 
Captains Welch and Ross, Adjutant Minear, and one hundred and forty-three men wounded. In 
June it accompanied the advance on Tullahoma, across Lookout Mountain into McLamore s Cove, 
and, with Negley s and Baird s divisions, September llth at Dug Gap, confronted Bragg s army. 
In this movement, at the foot of Mission Ridge, General Negley directed Colonel Stanley to hold 
his position. The enemy were pressing, but the brigade kept them at a respectable distance. 

In a day or two commenced the march for Chickamauga. The regiment did not get into the 
thickest of the fight until Sunday, September 20th, but went gallantly through the battle, making 
several brilliant charges. Colonel Stanley in his report noticed the gallantry and coolness of 
Captains Grosvenor, McElroy, and Cable, Lieutenants Carlin, Benedict, Clark, Honnold, Grubb, 
Ryan, Carter, Acton, Ferrel, and Evans. Sergeant-Major George Hewitt and private Joseph 
Embody, of company II, are noticed "for their gallantry in rescuing the colors of the regiment 
when they fell from Lieutenant Carlin s hands, and bringing them safely from the field." 

The regiment performed Engineering-duty, and aided in building boats, warehouses, saw 
mills, and hospitals at Chattanooga, until October 20th, when it was ordered to Camp Chase to 
be mustered out of service. On the 9th of November, 1864, it was honorably discharged. 
Nearly one hundred men had re-enlisted as veterans, and there were enough recruits, whose 
time was not out, to make it up to two hundred and twenty-five men. 

SECOND ORGANIZATION. 

Before the Eighteenth Ohio left Chattanooga, Major-General Steedman, then commanding 
the District of the Etowah, solicited from General Thomas the requisite authority, and received 
an order to consolidate the detachments of the First, Second, Eighteenth, Twenty-Fourth, and 
Thirty-Fifth Ohio Regiments, remaining in service in accordance with the requirements of 



EIGHTEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 131 

General Order, No. 8G, of April 2, 1863, from War Department; the organization formed to be de 
signated the Eighteenth Ohio, and to be commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel C. II. Grosvenor. 

Colonel Grosvenor went energetically to work, and succeeded in getting his command together 
and ready for the battle of Nashville, which was fought on the 6th of December, 1864. The 
Eighteenth was in the first line of the brigade, and moved behind Colonel Morgan s line, and, 
finally, well up to Rains s House, and in the ravines skirting the elevation on which were the 
Rebels. Colonel Morgan s skirmish-line had been driven back by the terrible lire of the enemy 
posted behind earthworks. The Eighteenth assaulted and dislodged this force. A cornfield, 
covered by the enemy in its front, was to be passed over, two heavy picket fences were rapidly 
thrown down and a desperate charge on the Rebel works made. The palisade defenses were 
swept away, and nearly one hundred men gained the interior and made short work of driving 
the Rebels out. Captain Grosvenor led the head of his regiment straight upon the enemy s 
works, and while in the act of springing over the embankment fell forward dead, struck by three 
balls. Lieutenant Samuel "W. Thomas also fell, instantly killed, while removing palisades. 
Captain Benedict was wounded, Lieutenant Charles Grant assuming command. The regiment 
was withdrawn under a hot fire, and re-formed on the lei t of the Orphan Asylum. That night 
the regiment slept upon the field. On the 16th, under Captain Benedict, the Eighteenth took 
part in the bloody and finally successful assault upon Overtoil Hill. It lost four officers out of 
seven, and seventy-five men killed and wounded out of less than two hundred. That night, in a 
drenching rain, without blankets, the men bivouacked in the woods in line of battle. 

Attached to General Steedman s command, the Eighteenth followed Hood s defeated forces 
to Huntsville, and two days later .assisted in the capture of Decatur. The pursuit was continued 
to Tuscumbia. Chattanooga was reached January 10, 1865, and the regiment went into camp. 
Captain Benedict was promoted to Major, and took command, Lieutenant-Colonel Grosvenor 
commanding the brigade. The organization of the regiment was now prosecuted with vigor, but 
the mustering officers were tardy in their movements, and the complete organization was not 
effected until April. At that time the officers were regularly advanced, but not without much 
useless controversy with the Governor of Ohio. During the spring several expeditions were 
made into East Tennessee to capture and disperse bands of Rebel cavalry. 

In April the regiment moved to the vicinity of Fort Phelps, where a beautiful model camp 
was made and the regiment thoroughly drilled. A few bad men had crept into the organization, 
belonging to thai class of miserable skulkers called substitutes, some of whom were guilty of 
depredations and desertion, but the old and true soldiers fully sustained the record earned by the 
old Eighteenth on the battle-fields of the Army of the Cumberland. Colonel Grosvenor, bre- 
vetted Brigadier-General, was assigned to the command of the Post of Chattanooga in May. 

The war had closed, and the men of the Eighteenth amused themselves in decorating their 
camp. Company head-quarters fairly bloomed with flowers; the streets Avere macadamized also. 

In July the regiment accompanied General Steedman to his new quarters at Augusta, Georgia. 
General Grosvenor was assigned to duty as Provost-Marshal General of the Department with 
Major Chappell and Lieutenant Irwin as Aids. Upon Lieutenant Irwin devolved the duty of 
administering the oath of allegiance to the female Rebels of the city. In performing this duty 
many rich scenes were witnessed, as it was impossible, under the orders, for any of them to get 
their letters out of the post-office without a certificate that they had taken the oath. One morn 
ing a bright-eyed beauty bustled into the office, and with a look of mingled scorn and disgust 
demanded to take the oath, at the same time saying: "I take it so I can get my letters, but I hate 
your Government as bad as ever." Her hand was uplifted, and the words of the oath were upon 
her lips, when General Grosvenor, who had just entered the room unperceived, seized the paper 
from Lieutenant Irwin s hand, and turning to the beauty said: "Madam, you may not hesitate to 
lay perjury upon your soul, but I will not let you do so." He tore up the paper and gave orders 
that in future this woman should not be permitted to take the oath. 

On October 9th the order for muster out came, and in a few days the regiment was on its was 
to Columbus, Ohio, where, October 22, 1865, the men scattered to their homes. 



132 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



19th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



KOSTEB, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


SAMUEL BEATTY 

E. W. HOLLINGSWORTH 

B B BRVSHE^R 


May 

April 
May 


29, 1861 
29, 

% : 

24, 
24, 

14, | 
25, 
05 " 


May 

April 
May 


29, 1861 
29, " 
13, " 
13, 
24, 
24. 
14, 
25, 
25, 


Promoted to Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Adjutant. 


Lt. Colonel.... 


Ass t Surgeon 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 


FRANCIS D. 310RRIS 

Samuel Beatty 
E. W. Hollingsworth 
Norman A. Barrett 
Robert W Crane .. . . 


Do 


Urwin Bean 


Do 
Do 


George E. Paine 
Lewis P. Buckley 
Hiram K. Preston 
Win. B. Hoyt 
Andrew .7. Konkle 
Chas. F. Manderson 
Roswell Shurtliff 
Alex. Stihvell 
Cha< F Manderson 


June 
May 

April 

May 


24, " 

29 * 

22^ " 
24, " 
23, 
30, " 
8, " 
29, " 
24, " 
24, " 
14, " 
25, " 
25, || 

22\ || 

1 i 


June 
May 
April 

May 


24, " 
22, " 
22, " 
24, " 

Ml " 

8, " 
29, " 
24, " 
24, " 
14, " 
25, " 
25, 
24, 
22, 
22, 
24, 
23, 
30, 
29, 
29, ; 
24, 
24, 
14, | 

24* 

22, 
22, 
24, 
23, " 


Do 


Do 


]) 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


James C. Richards 
Henry G. Stratum 
Jolin J. Hoyt 


Robert Shearer 


Andrew J. Fulkerson 
\lex Stilwt ll 


J. P. Manning 
Paul T. Kirbv _ 


James S. Harber 


W. H. K. Hilliard 


J. W. Fitch 
Eobert H. Rea 


April 
May 


24, " 

14 j " 
25, " 
25, " 
24, II 

23, " 


April 
May 


George T. Perkins 


Henry G. Walcott 
Orrin Copp 


Alex. T. Snodgrass 
Samuel Hathawav 
Gilbert S. Carp-liter 
J. Allen Campbell 
Marshal H. Ilaskull 
James Nelson 





ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


SAMUEL BEATTY 




10, 1861 
15, 1863 
31, 1865 
6, 1S61 
19, 1863 
15, " 
20, 1865 
31, " 
2, 1861 
7, isite 
19, 186;:! 
15, " 
19, " 
29, 1865 
31, " 
1, 1861 
14, 1863 
S 1865 
3, 1861 
20, 1862 
4, " 
29, 1863 
8, 1X65 
31, 1861 
1, 186-. 1 
26, 1861 
28, " 
1, || 

!<) " 
12, " 
13, " 
15, " 
1, 1862 
5, " 
7. " 


Dec. 
April 
May 
Dec. 
Feb. 

F-ef 1 

May 
Dec. 
May 
Feb. 
April 
July 
March 
May- 
Dec. 
March 
April 
Dec. 
Aug. 
Oct. 
April 

Dec. 
Feb. 
Dec. 

Feb. 
Mav 


16, 1861 
7, 1863 
31, 1865 
16, 1861 
25, 1863 

20 1865 
31, " 
16, 1861 
1, 1862 
25, 1863 
7, " 
20, " 
29, 1865 
31, " 
16, 1861 
30, 1863 
8, 1865 
16, 1861 
22, 1862 
31, " 
29, 1863 
8, 1865 
16, 1861 
19, 1861 
16, 1*61 
16, 
16, 

w 1 : 

16, 
16, 
10, 
16, 
5, 1862 
5, " 
1. " 


Appointed Brigadier-General Nov. 29, 1862. 
Honorably discharged March 16, 1865. 
Mustered out as Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned January 19, 1863. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out February 13, 1865. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out as Major. 
Killed at Pittsburg Landing April 7, 1862. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned July 19, 1863. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Discharged March 14, 1863. 
Mustered out April 1, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Declined. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Resigned August 22, 1864. 
Died September 25, 1865. 
Resigned February 18, 1862. 
Mustered out per Special Order Aug. 3, 1865. 
Deceased. 
Resigned December 2. 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned December 18, 1863. 
Kill- d January 2, 1863. 
Promoted to Major. 
Died April 31, 1862. 
Mustered out February 13, 18G5. 
Mustered out May 27, 1863. 
Duclinud. 


Do 


CHAS. F. M ANDERSON.. 
JAMES M. NASH 
E. W. HOLLINGSWORTH 

CHAS. F. 3IANDERSON 


March 
May 
Aug. 
Jan. 
March 
Feb. 
May 
Aug. 
April 
Jan. 
.March 
June 
March 
May 
Oct. 
March 
April 
Oct. 
Aug. 
July 
April 

Oct. 

May 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Jan. 
Feb. 
Anril 


Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 

Do! !!!! 
Major 

DO! !!!!!!!!!!!! 

Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do 
Do 
Do 


JAMES M. NASH 
SOLOMON FIRESTON 


TIMOTHY D. EDWARDS 
CHAS. F. MANDERSON 
HENRY G. STRATTON 
WM. 11. ALLKN 


SOLOMON FIRESTON 
LEWIS 11. Fix 
FRKD K. T. HUHXTHAL 
BENJ. M. TAYLOR 
A. II. SOWERS 
BENJ. M. TAYLOR 
NEEMAS COLE 
A. H. SOWERS 
ROBERT McNxr.LEY 
J. II BITEM\N 


Do 


Chaplain 
Do 
Captain 
Do 


THOMAS MI-CLEARY 
JOHN B. SMITH 
Win. Rakeetraw 
Paul F Kirbv 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


Chas. F. Manderson 
Henry G. Stratton 
Win. H. Allen 
Thomas Stack pole 
Urwin Bean 
Barnes M. Nash 
Franklin E. Sto we 
Peter A. Sanbie 
Oscar 0. Miller 



NINETEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



133 



KANK. 


NAMK. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


UKMARKS. 






Aug 7 186 


Au" 22 1862 


Promoted to Major 


Do 




44 30, " 


22, 


Resinned December 16, 1862. 


Do 




Dec 2 4l 




Resigned November 23 1863 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


( harles Brewer 
Carrel Smith 
Triah W. Irwin 
Win. II. Burke 
Joseph J. Agard 


16, " 
Jan. 2, 1863 
March 15, " 
15, " 
Juno 19, 4l 


April 7, 1.S63 
July 2o 44 


vill.-d May 29. 1864. 
R -signed October 4, 1864. 
Hed December 8, 1S63. 
Dismissed July 24, 1863. 
11 morably discharged January 27, 1865. 


Do 




July 29, " 


Aug. 18, 44 


Honorably discharged as 1st Lieutenant. 


Do 
Do 


Wm. A. Knapp 
Lewis K Fix 


May 27 " 
March 15, 1.S64 


18, " 

March 15, 1861 


Honorably discharged October 19, 1804. 
Promoted to Major. 


Do 


Richard L. Walker 


July 25, " 


July 25, 44 


Detached at own reijuest. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Calvin S. Chamberlin 
Albert K.Upson 
Wm. S. S. Erb 
Philip Reefy 


4 4 25 4 4 
Dec. 2l! " 


44 25, 44 
25, " 
25, 


Mustered out with regiment. 
.Mustered out with regiment, 
R -signed November 22, 1864. 
On/letached duty at muster out of regiment 


Do 
Do 


Almon K. Raff. 
Win H Adams 


44 2 1 1 4 4 


21, " 

44 21, 44 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment 


Do 


Homer C Kei-d . . 


Feb. 20, 1S65 


Feb. 25, 1,<65 


* i detached service at muster out of regiment 


Do 
Do 


David Bash 
Henry M. Fusselman 


20, " 
March 29, 4 


25, " 
.March 29, " 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regim.-nt. 








Dec l(i 1^61 




Do 








Promoted to Captain. 


Do 




14 26 4 


14 K) 4l 


Resi- lied August 1 1862 


Do. 

Do 


Oscar O. Miller 


Sept, 7, 




Promoted to Captain. 


Do. 


Peter A. Sanbie 


44 10 


16 , " 


Promoted to Captain. 


Do. 
Do 


Samuel Lent/. 
J IHnsford Percival 


44 1 IV 4 


44 1C) " 




Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Carrel Smith 
Wm. H. Burke 

EdwardS. Myers 


44 15, 4 
Nov. ~\\ " 


{S; - 

16, || 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted as Q. 31. 
Appointed Captain 107th 0. V.I. ISov. 11, 1863. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Job D. Bell 
I liomas J. Walton 
David W. Hildebrand 


Feb. 5, || 

April 7] 4l 
Feb < " 


May l " 
A ue 2 * 4 


Killed January 2, 1863. 
Mustered out February 13, 1865. 
Revoked. 


Do. 
Do 


Wm. A. Knapp 
Aurora C. Keel 


April 7, " 

3o, " 




Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Do! 
Do 


Lewis II. Fix 
Daniel Donovan 


Aug. 1, " 
Nov. 19, 4i 


Dec. 2, 1862 


Promoted to Captain. 
Killed December 31, 1S63. 


Do 


Win \ Sutherland 


Dec 2 44 


4 4 . A) 


Appointed A A G 31ay 9 1864 


Do 


Calvin S. Chamberlin 


44 31, 4l 


Feb. 18, 1863 


Promoted to Captain. 


Do 


Albert K. Upson 


Jan. 2, 1863 


April 7, 4> 


Promoted to Captain. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Richard L. Walker : 
Wm. S. S. Erb 
J. Steward Kelley 


Dec. 16, 18t > 
Jan. 2, 18( 3 
April 2, 
March 15 4 


2 " 

" 7 " 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned June 22, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain 


Do. 
Do 


Homer C. Reed 
Wm II Adams 


June 23, 4 


July 20, " 

44 20 4 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain 


Do 


\ Imnn K Tlaff 


May 2~ 4 


An" 18 4 


Promoted to Captain 


Do 


David Bash 




44 18 4 


Promoted to Captain 


Do. 
Do. 


Henry 31. Fusselman 
Joseph Vignos 


25, 1864 


July 25, 186-1 


Promoted to Captain. 
1 romoted to (Jap tain. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Wesley Tpson 
Wm. F. Mcllenrv 

Thomas A. Brierly 
J-ison llurd 


4% 25, 


:: I :: 


Killed in action August 24, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


Do. 
Do. 


Christian Felber 
John Culbertson 


Dec. 21, 


Dec. 2\\ " 
21, 4 


Mustered out with regiment. 
31ustered out with regiment. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Joseph H. Penny 
Jacob Bidarnont 
Alfred W. Stambaugh 
James G. Bailey 
Monro- Ebi 
Wm. F. Hunt 
Philip C. Meek 
Win 31 Carr. 


21, 
Feb. 20, 1865 
44 20, 4i 
14 20, 44 
March 29, ll 
Sept. 4, 44 
44 4, 4 
Nov 1 44 


21, " 
Feb. 20, 1865 
20, " 
20, 4I 
3Iarch 29, 4 
Sept. 4, " 
44 4, 4 
Nov. 1 " 


3lustered out with regiment, 
On detached service at muster out of reg t. 
Resigned 31 ay 31, 1865. 
Mustered cmt with regiment. 
Resigned June 7, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
.Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


2d Lieutenant 
Do 


David W. llil.lebrand 
Joseph.! A-ard 


Aug. 26, 1861 

" 28 4 4 


Dec. 16, 1.S61 

16, " 


Died July 20, 1862. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do 




Sept 4 4 




lomoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 


Job D. Bell 


A - t> 


1 i, " 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Thomas J. Walton 
Lewis K. Fix 
Daniel Donovan 


10, 4> 
44 12, " 
44 13, 4l 


44 16, 4 
44 16, " 
16, 44 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Vomoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
J romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Ambrose C. Shaffer 
Win. A. Sutherland 
James Wilson 


44 15, 
Aug. 26, 
Feb. 5, 1, 62 


" 1 ., " 
Feb. 18, 1864 


)ischarged September 15, 1*62. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned December 25, 1662. 


Do 


Richard L Walker 


July 2() 4 


Aug. 22* 4 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do 


Albert K I pson. 


Feb ) 




romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do 


Wm S S Krb 


April 7 


it >> ** 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 
Do 


Russell Case 


Aug. is, " 


Oct. 5, " 


iesigned 31arch 26, 1.S63. 


Do. 


Wm. 11. Adams 


Sept. 15, 44 




romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 

T)n 


Homer 0. R <>d 


June 3, " 


" ! " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do! 


Almon K. Raff. 


Dec. 2, " 


April \ 1863 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 
Do. 


Henry M. Fusselman 
David Bash 


4 4 25, 




romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do. 
Do. 


Jason Ilurd 


March 26 , 4l 


\ " 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 


g; 

Do. 
Do 
Do! 


Win. F. McHcnry 
Thomas A. Brierly 
Joseph Vignos 
Christian Felber 
John Culbertson..: 
Joseph H. Penny 


.Ian. 2, 4l 
March 15, 44 
Jan. 1, 4I 
June 19, 4< 

May 27] 44 


31ay ( , , " 
July 2f, " 
20, 44 
Aug. 18 44 


romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Revoked. 


Do. 


George J. Swank 


July 29, " 


18, " 


Kevoked. 



134 



OHIO IN THE WAE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATK OF RANK. 


COM. ISSVED. 


REMARKS. 


2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

SS: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


George M. Hull 
Joseph 11. Penny 


Jl 

F 

N 


ly 2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
b. 2 
2 
2i 
2i 

Y. 


5, 18fi4 
5, " 
>, " 
i, 
% " 
5, " 
5, 
5, " 
), 1S6.5 
), " 
J, " 
), " 


July 2 

2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
Feb. 2 
" 2 
" 2 
" 2 
Nov. 


- ]>i fl 
>, 

% 

5, 
>, 

!, i* 

, 

j) 


\ Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

> Resigned May 19, 1865. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out as Sersreants ; complimentary 
] commissions given after the regiment was 
mustered out. 


Jacob Bidamont 
A If rod W. Stambaugh. 
Frank H. Wheeler 


James G. Bailev 


Monroe Ebi 


J. Stanley Cochran 


Onesenius P. Shaffer 


Wm. M. Carr 
Win. F. Hunt 


Philip C. Meek 






Wm H Underwood., . 


J David Vestal 








\Vm. BcMiir.tt 













NINETEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE NINETEENTH INFANTKY was among the organizations winch sprang 
into existence at the sound of the guns at Fort Sumter. It was composed of recruits 
from seven counties, as follows: company A from Canton, Stark County; company B, 
Youngstown, Mahoning County ; company C, Warren, Trumbull County ; company D, Ashtalnila; 
company E, New Lisbon, Columbiana County; company F, Geauga County ; company G, Akron, 
Summit County ; company H, New Lisbon, Columbiana County ; company I, Ashtabula County ; 
company K, Akron. 

By the 15th of May, 1861, these companies were all in quarters at Camp Taylor, near Cleve 
land. On May 27th they repaired by rail to Columbus and occupied Camp Jackson, where, as 
was then the custom, an election for officers was held, with the following result: Colonel, Sam 
uel Beatty ; Lieutenant-Colonel, Elliott W. Hollingsworth ; Major, Lewis P. Buckley. In the after~ 
noon companies A and B were marched to the State Arsenal, were armed and equipped, and at 
once started in the cars for Bellair. The other eight companies were sent to Camp Goddard, at 
Zanesville, to perfect themselves in the drill. 

Companies A and B continued on duty guarding the ferry at Bellair until June 3d. They 
were then taken to Glover s Gap and Mannington, where they performed the same duty until the 
20th of June. Both companies then joined the regiment at Bellair, where, on June 21st, the 
Seventeenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Ohio regiments of infantry embarked on twelve steamers, 
and reached Parkersburg on June 23d. While at Parkersburg the Nineteenth, with the Eighth 
and Tenth Ohio and Thirteenth Indiana, were organized into a brigade, under Brigadier-General 
Wm. S. Rosecrans. 

On June 25th the troops moved by rail to Clarksburg. Here was brought together General 
McClellan s " Provisional Army of West Virginia," On June 29th the Nineteenth, with the 
advance, left Clarksburg and made its first real march, reaching Buckhannon on July 2d. 
Moving from Buckhannon on July 7th, the army reached Roaring Creek, and encamped in front 
of the fortified Rebel position at Rich Mountain. General Rosecrans said of the part which the 
Nineteenth Ohio bore in this battle : " Seven companies of the Nineteenth deployed into line and 
delivered two splendid volleys; when the enemy broke." And subsequently : "The Nineteenth 



NINETEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 135 

distinguished itself for the cool and handsome manner in which it held its post against a flank 
attack, and for the manner in which it came into line and delivered its fire near the close of the 
action." The regiment had but three men slightly wounded. 

On July 23d, its term of service having expired, it moved to Webster, on the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad, and thence to Columbus, Ohio, where it arrived on the 27th of July, and by 
August 5th all the men were at home, receiving the congratulations of friends. In their trip 
through Ohio, especially at Chillicothe, the regiment received all the attentions that could be 
bestowed by a patriotic and grateful people. 

Many of the officers immediately busied themselves in obtaining recruits for a three years 
term of service, and by the 26th of September nine companies had reported with full complements 
of men, and were mustered into the service. 

By November 7th the regiment was in Camp Dennison, fully armed and equipped. On 
November 16th it moved by rail to Cincinnati, and thence by steamer to Louisville, Kentucky, 
and was the first regiment to go into Camp Jenkins, five miles from the city. Here it remained, 
with General Ormsby M. Mitchel as its camp commander, until December 6th, when it was taken 
by rail to Lebanon, Kentucky. Thence it marched forty miles to Columbia. On this march a 
teamster, Jacob Clunck, was run over by his team and instantly killed. This was the first death 
in the Nineteenth Ohio. 

The regiment reached Columbia on December 10th, and was brigaded with the Fifty-Ninth 
Ohio, Second and Ninth Kentucky Infantry, and Haggard s regiment of cavalry, constituting the 
Eleventh Brigade, General J. T. Boyle commanding. While at Columbia a beautiful silk flag 
was received by the hands of A. Kitt, Esq., as a present from the ladies of Canton. The flag 
was received with all the honors, and the presentation address of Mr. Kitt appropriately replied 
to by Captain Charles F. Manderson. On December 17th the regiment lost Captain Wm. Rake- 
straw, of company I, who died of diptheria. 

On January 17, 1862, the Nineteenth Ohio and Third Kentucky marched to the mouth of 
Renick s Creek, near Burkesville, on the Cumberland River. On January 16th the command 
moved up the Cumberland River, through Creelsboro , to Jamestown, and was there joined by 
the Sixth Ohio Battery of artillery. Position was taken at the mouth of Greasy Creek for the 
purpose of preventing a junction by river of the forces at Mill Springs, under Zollicoffer, and 
the enemy at Nashville. The Rebel defeat at Mill Springs, and the evacuation by the enemy of 
his fortifications at Bowling Green, rendered a force on the upper waters of the Cumberland 
unnecessary, and February loth saw the Nineteenth again on the march back to Columbia. 

While lying at Columbia disease made sad havoc among the men of the regiment. The 
measles and typhoid fever prevailed. In a few days over two hundred men were in hospital. 
Lieutenant S. Lentz, of company E, died of typhoid fever February 9, 1852 ; also Sergeant 
Augustus Johns, of the same disease, about the same time. 

After making tedious marches to Glasgow and Bowling Green, the march was directed on 
Nashville, which place was reached on March 10th, and the regiment went into camp five miles 
out on the Murfreesboro Turnpike. The march from Camp Green had been one hundred and 
seventy miles, nearly half of which was made by the men with their shoes in such condition that 
they might be termed barefooted. 

On March 18th the regiment, with its brigade, left Nashville for Savannah, on the Tennes 
see River, and by Sunday, April 6th, was within fourteen miles of that place. The heavy boom 
of the cannon was heard, and the men struck out on the double-quick, hoping to reach the field 
in time to take part in the conflict. It was dark before the regiment was placed on board the 
boat that was to take it to Pittsburg Landing. On its arrival a sorry sight was presented; the 
army was driven almost to the river, and thousands of stragglers and wounded men lined 
the banks. 

The dreary rainy night was passed in line of battle on the field. At daylight the sharp 
rattle of musketry at the front showed that the enemy, flushed with his wonderful success of the 



136 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

first day, had determined to pursue his good fortune. Moving to the right, the men deposited 
their knapsacks and stripped off all useless weight for the coming fight. General J. T. Boyle, 
commanding the brigade, said of the Nineteenth: "The Colonel and Captain Manderson (acting 
Major) held their -men steady, and deported themselves, as did their officers and men, with cool 
ness and courage, until the Colonel ordered them back to a position from under the fire of the 
enemy s battery. This position was held until the guns of the enemy were silenced by the well- 
directed fire of Captain Bartlett s battery. Major Edwards (acting Lieutenant-Colonel) was 
shot dead from his horse, and a number of privates were killed and wounded." Privates O. T. 
Powell and Horace H. Bailey, of company C, and Corporal W. E. Gibson, of company H, were 
killed. Lieutenant "Wm. A. Sutherland, of company H, was severely wounded in the shoulder. 

The next ten days were spent by the regiment without tents or camp equipage, in the mud 
and rain, and the terrible stench of the battle-field. With the baggage, which reached the com 
mand on April llth, came pleasant weather, and the blush of early spring spread itself over the 
battle-field. 

The regiment participated in the approach to and siege of Corinth. During the march on 
the 31st of April, 1862, Captain Franklin E. Stowe, of company G, died of disease. On May 
22d, near Farmington, the regiment had a picket skirmish in which six men were wounded, two 
of whom subsequently died. On May 29th it entered Corinth with the army, and on the 3d of 
June marched in pursuit of the enemy, going as far as Brownsboro . It then returned to luka, 
and there joined General Buell s column, and marched with it to Florence, Alabama, and to 
Battle Creek, which last place it reached July 14th. On July 21st Lieutenant David W. liil- 
debrand died of disease. 

On August 21st the regiment marched from Battle Creek, with General McCook s division, 
to Nashville. At that place it joined the concentrated army under General Buell, and with it 
made that arduous march to Louisville, Kentucky. 

On October 1st the regiment marched out of Louisville with Crittenden s division on the 
Bardstown Turnpike, passing through that place and reaching the vicinity of Perryville on Octo 
ber 8th, in time to witness a portion of that battle, but not to participate. After the battle was 
ended, the regiment moved with the army in pursuit of the Rebels, and in the vicinity of Crab 
Orchard had a running skirmish, capturing a Rebel gun with its accouterments. 

The Rebel army having retreated from Kentucky by way of Cumberland Gap, the Nine 
teenth marched through Somerset and Glasgow to Gallatin. After doing provost-duty at Galla- 
tin for two weeks, it joined its division at the Hermitage, and passing through Nashville, went 
into camp on the Murfreesboro Turnpike, near the State Lunatic Asylum. 

On December 26th the regiment, under command of Major Charles F. Manderson, marched 
with the army in its advance on Murfreesboro . December 31st it was thrown across Stone River, 
on the left, with the view of swinging around into Murfreesboro , but the disaster to McCook s 
right wing compelled its withdrawal, and recrossing the river it passed to the right, and by a 
determined resistance aided to check the advance of the Rebels. Under the personal lead of 
Major-General Rosecrans, Beatty s brigade charged the enemy, drove him about three-fourths of 
a mile, and held by the position until relieved by Colonel M. B. Walker s brigade. 

On January 2d, with the Fourteenth and Twenty-Third Brigades, the regiment crossed Stone 
River, and received the charge of the Rebel column under Breckinridge. They were forced to 
retreat, but the pursuing Rebels coming under the range of the massed artillery, were driven 
back over the river and beyond it, with great slaughter. The Nineteenth Ohio and the Ninth 
Kentucky were the first to cross Stone River, and with the assistance of men of other regiments 
captured four pieces of artillery from the famous Washington (Louisiana) Battery. A mile of 
ground was gained, and had darkness not prevented, they would have gone into Murfreesboro . 
Captain Bean, of company E, Lieutenant Bell, of company C, Lieutenant Donovan, of company 
B, and Sergeant-Major Lyman Tilee were here killed. Lieutenant Sutherland, company H, and 
Lieutenant Keel, company F, were severely wounded. The regiment entered the battle with four 



NINETEENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 137 

hundred and forty-nine men, and lost in killed, wounded, and missing, two hundred and thir 
teen, nearly one-half. 

Murfreesboro was occupied January 4, 1863. The regiment went into camp on the Lib 
erty Turnpike. On January 5th Lieutenant-Colonel Hollingsworth having resigned, Major C. 
F. Manderson was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, and Captain H. G. Stratton to Major. 

The whole army remained at Murfreesboro until June 28th, during which time the Nine 
teenth guarded an ammunition train to Manchester over the worst of roads. Thence it marched 
to McMinnville, where it remained until August 16th. It then crossed the Cumberland Mount 
ains to Pikeville, in Sequatchie Valley, and with the division passed over Lookout Mountain, 
and reached Lee & Gordon s Mills on the 13th of September. At Crawfish Springs the regiment 
had a brisk skirmish in which two men of company D were killed. 

On September 18th, at nine o clock A. M., the Nineteenth was ordered, with the Seventy-Ninth 
Indiana, supported by the Ninth and Seventeenth Kentucky, to advance upon the enemy. The 
regiment advanced with a cheer, drove the enemy, and captured a Rebel battery, with some 
prisoners. The advance of this small force was checked by a large body of the enemy, which 
forced it back, but not until it had secured and carried off its captures. As they fell back they 
were mistaken for Eebel troops and fired upon. This fatal mistake caused the loss of a number 
of men. McCook s division opportunely charged the advancing Rebels and drove them in turn. 

On September 20th, the second day of the battle of Chickamauga, the regiment held an 
important position, and performed its share of hard fighting until nightfall, when the whole army 
withdrew to Chattanooga. Captain Uriah W. Irwin received a wound in this battle, which 
caused his death December 8, 1863. Lieutenant W. F. McIIenry was also severely wounded. 
A private of company G received seven wounds during the first day s battle. The aggregate loss 
of the regiment was one hundred men killed, wounded, and missing. 

The Nineteenth remained in Chattanooga during the siege. On November 23d the regiment 
took part in the advance on Orchard Knob, and lost soihe twenty men, killed and wounded. On 
November ^5th it participated in that glorious charge on the Rebel works at the foot of Mission 
Ridge, and seizing the inspiration, climbed, without orders, the precipitous sides of the mount 
ain and aided in driving the Rebels over and down the opposite side. In this charge the regi 
ment lost one man killed and thirteen wounded. 

Returning to Chattanooga, it was almost immediately sent with Sherman toward Knoxville. 
This march was among the severest during the war. The men were ragged and almost shoeless, 
and left their footprints in blood on the snowy ground. Finding that Longstreet had raised the 
siege of Knoxville, the forces moved to Strawberry Plains and Flat Creek. At the last-named 
place, on January 1, 1864, four hundred men of the Nineteenth Ohio re-enlisted as veteran vol 
unteers. On January 4th the regiment left Flat Creek, and by the 16th reached Chattanooga, 
where the papers being prepared, the three years regiment was mustered out of, and the veteran 
Nineteenth Ohio mustered into, the service. The regiment then returned to Ohio, reaching 
Cleveland on the 16th of February. 

On March 17th the veterans were promptly in camp at Cleveland. They returned immedi 
ately to the front, reaching Knoxville on the 24th of March. The regiment remained here up to 
the 9th of April, when it moved to McDonald s Station, Tennessee, and with the Third Brigade, 
Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, remained quietly in camp, awaiting the return of non-vete 
rans and preparing for the Atlanta campaign. 

On May 6th Sherman s entire command entered on the Atlanta campaign. The Nineteenth 
was sent to Parker s Gap, to hold that pass. On May 20th it rejoined its brigade at Cassville. 
Moving with the column, the Nineteenth participated in the sharp fight at New Hope Church. 
Captain Charles Brewer, of company E, was killed, Major Nash lost his left hand, Captain 
Smith, of company G, was severely wounded in the head, and forty-four men were killed and 
wounded. The regiment was engaged at Kenesaw, at Peachtree Creek, and at the crossing of the 
Chattahoochie River, and was under fire almost daily up to the evacuation of Atlanta. It also 
passed with Sherman around to the right of Atlanta in the affair at Jonesboro . 



138 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

On September 2, 1864, the regiment participated in the action at Love joy Station. Captain 
Miller, of company I, was killed ; Colonel C. F. Manderson severely wounded in the spine; Captain 
Agard, of company K, severely wounded in the shoulder. Seventy men were killed and wounded. 
It captured the enemy s front line of works and held it for three days, and until Sherman s army 
.returned to Atlanta. 

The entire loss of the regiment in the Atlanta campaign was: killed, two commissioned 
officers and twenty-eight men ; wounded, six commissioned officers and ninety-six men ; missing, 
thirte3n men ; total, one hundred and forty-five. Lieutenant Win. F. McIIenry, of company I, 
was killed in front of Atlanta on the 24th of August, 1864, and Captain Lewis K. Fix, of com 
pany B, was severely wounded on the same day. 

On October 1st, after General Sherman had started with the main army in his march to the 
sea, the Nineteenth, forming a part of General George H. Thomas s command, left Atlanta and 
marched toward -Nashville to aid in opposing General Hood. 

On October 29th, at the battle of Franklin, the regiment was held in reserve. It reached 
Nashville the night after the battle of Franklin, and during the investment of that place by the 
Rebels engaged in frequent sorties, with inconsiderable loss. 

The regiment participated in the battle of Nashville with small loss, and then followed in 
pursuit of Hood s defeated and demoralized army to the Tennessee River. 

On January 5, 1865, the regiment was at Huntsville, Alabama, where comfortable quarters 
were erected, but were only occupied until the 31st, when the command again moved to Nashville, 
for what purpose it was never ascertained, for on February 6th it was ordered back to Huntsville. 
On March 17th Colonel Manderson resigned from physical disability, and Colonel Stratton 
having resigned some months earlier, Major Nash was made Lieutenant-Colonel, and remained 
in command of the regiment during the rest of its service. 

From Huntsville it was moved into East Tennessee. Marching as far as the Virginia line, 
it then returned to Nashville on April 25th. On June 16th it formed a part of that column of 
troops sent to Texas, reaching Green Lake July 14, 1865. It left Green Lake September llth, 
and arrived at Sari Antonio on the 23d. This march was one of the most arduous of all its 
campaigns. The excessive heat and lack of water caused intense suffering. The march was 
made over one of the sandy plains of that region. 

On October 21st the Nineteenth was mustered out of service at San Antonio, and started on 
its return home. It reached Columbus, Ohio, on November 22d, and was paid off and dis 
charged at Camp Chase November 25, 1865, after nearly five years of varied and honorable 
service. 



TWENTIETH OHIO INFANTRY. 



139 



20th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATK OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


RKMARK8. 


Colonel 
I)o 
Do 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Mator 
Do 


CHAS. WHITTLESEY 
MA\NIX(! F. FORCE 
HARRISON WILSON 
1OH \ C FRY 


Aug. 
April 
Juno 
Jan 


19, 
19, 


IS 


Dec. 
May 
June 
Feh 


16, 
1, 
21, 


861 

- c,: 


Resigned April 19, 1862. 
Appointed Brigadier-General. 

Mustered out with regiment. 


MANNING F. FOKPF. 
JAMKS N. McELROY 
JOHN C. FKY 
FRANCIS M. SUA< KLF.K 
HARRISON WILSON 
PKTKK WKATHF.HHV 
JAMKS N. McEutoY 
JOHN C. FRY 
EDWIN C. DOWNS 
FRANCIS M. SHACKI.F.K 
HAKKISON WILSON 


Aug. 

April 
Jan. 


19, 
19, 


1864 
lstV~> 


Dec. 

& 

Jan. 


16, 
1, 

R, 
, 


$61 


Promoted to Colonel. 
Resigned January 7, 1864. [nl. 
Resigned October ll), 1864 ; promoted to Colo- 
Mustered out November 25, 1864. 


Juno 
Sept. 
April 
Jan. 
April 
Jan. 


21, 
11, 
19, 

22l 
6, 


1861 
1862 
1864 

186"> 


June 

Dec 

& 
.ff 


iY>j 
1, 

8, 

&l 


1 86 I 
186] 

is.-,i 

18fi5 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned April 1, 1864. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Must-red out as Captain. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out us Captain. 
Mustered out September 18, 1864. 


Do 
Do 
Do 


Do 
Do 
Surgeon 

Do 


PKTF.R WF.ATHF.RRY 
WM. L. WADDKLL 
KDWARD L. HIM 
II. B. FincKF.n.. 
JOH\ G. PURPLE 
II. 1. FRICKER 
J. W. GUTHRIE 
JAMES KNAPP 


April 
June 
Sept. 
Oct. 

Sept. 

May 
Aug. 

Dec. 
July 
Aus. 

Sept. 


1, 
21, 


186] 
ISCi-l 
1861 
1862 

186] 
1862 
1861 


April 
.In no 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

May 
An?. 
Dec. 

All!?. 

Dec. 


1, 

21, 

1 " , 
12, 
Ifi, 
26, 
28, 
Ifi, 
11, 
Ifi, 
l "s 
16, 


1 S61 
186-1 

1862 

1861 
1862 
ISfil 


Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 


9, 
13, 
21, 

16, 

28. 
18, 
3, 

4, 


Died May 13, 1>62. 
Promoted to Surjrnon. 
Mustered out with reciment. 
Resinned April 28, 1862. 
Resigned Julv 20, 1863. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned February 22, 1862. 
Resisrn-d February 16, 1863. 
Resi-rned January ^, 1863. 


Do 
Captain 
Do 
Do. 


,1. W. ALDERMAN 
Jolm C. Frv 
Elislia Hyatt 
George Rogers 


Do 
Do 
Do 

Do 


James M. MeCov 
Charles II. McElrov 
Win. W. Updegraff.. 


Dec. 
Feb. 

Jan. 
April 

Feb. 
April 
Sept. 
Aug. 


hi, 
Ifi, 
5 
19, 

2?! 
19, 

ll , 
1 . , 
9. 
8, 


1862 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Marcl 
Jan. 
May 

Juno 

Sept. 
Oct. 


16, 
l ; , 

19] 

27, 
f, 
9. 
15, 
21, 
12, 
30, 





Appointed Mnior %th n^iment Aug. 8, 1S62. 
Resigned April 2.>, 1863. 
Resigned February ,), 1862. 
Promote.l to Major. 
Resigned April 26, 1862. 
Honorably discharged January 6, 1864. 
Declined. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Mnior. 
Declined promotion. 
Resigned Decembers, 1862. 
Honorably discharged March 28, 1864. 


Do! 


E lwin C. Downs 

Will. RoL,"l S 


Do 




Do 

Do 


Peter N, Hitchcock 
H"iij A F Greer 


Do 

Do. 


Krnnci.s M. Shacklee 
Erastus N. Owens 


Do 


Do 


Velorus T. Hills 


Do 


George L. Mellick 


Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
April 

Ian. 
April 

Tilly 
Jan. 


11, 
3, 

Ifi . 
14, 
19, 
1, 

2(1, 

g 

6* 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
11, 


186.3 
1864 

1865 


Jan. 
Feb. 

April 
May 

Jan. 
April 

July 
Jan. 


HI, 
10, 
8, 
2~>, 

30, 
20, 
20. 
20, 

6, 

fi, 

C, 

fi, 
fi, 
11, 


18b3 

l.siM 
1864 


Died October 20, 1863. 
Resigned April 14, 1863. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out October IS, 1864. 
Mustered out Novembers, 186. r >. 
Promoted to Major. 
Killed in action June 26, 1S64. 
Mustered nut. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out as Captain with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion ; mustered out as Q. M. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 

Do 


Anderson J. Edwards 
Harrison Wilson 


Do. 


Henrv M. Davis 


Do. 


Wm. II. Jacobs 


Do 
Do 


Nathan Bostwiek 
Win D Neal 


Do. 


Arthur II. Ilnmiston 
IVter Weatln-rbv 


Do. 


Do 


Win. M. Waddell 
R Mibeu M. Colbv 
Henry D. Dwight 

\Vin Rn-ih 


Do 
Do 


Do 


Do 


Samu- l G. Ilasler 


Do 


John W Ma tin in" 


Do 

Do 
Do 
Do 


lolm W. Skillen 


lames McCracken 
Win. O. Downs 


" 11, " 
11, " 


11, " 
11, " 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Joshua E. Clark 
Joseph Haines 


Juno 
Aug. 

Sept. 
Oct. 


11, 
1", 
21, 
21, 
18, 
19, 
31, 
3, 
4, 
7, 
10, 
11, 
16, 
11, 


1861 


Juno 

Dec. 


n! 

10, 
21, 

21, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 


1861 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out August 18. 1864. 
Resigned February 28, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Major 67th regiment. 
Resigned May 16, 18V.2. 

Promoted to Captain February 19, 1862. 

Resigned April 24. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Kdmund E. Nntt 
PhomasS. Ilawlev 
Win. L. Barrington 
Fames Knapp 
Peter N. Hitchcock 
Xachariah S. Adkins 


Tienj A F. Greer 


George L IMellick 


Velorns T. Hills 
John R Bond 


David R Hume 


Era^tus N. Owen 


Anson J. Edwards 
Henry M. Davis 


Feb. 


Ifi, 
19, 

22] 


ls>2 


Dec. 
Feb. 
Marcl 


16, 
19, 

(> , 


1861 
1862 


Lyman N. Ay res 



For three months Roster see page 167. 



140 



OHIO IN THE WAR 



letLieutem 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

I Lieutenai 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



David R. Rinehart 

Wm. H. Jacobs 

Nathan Bostwick , 

Wm. D. Neil 

Harrison Wilson 

Wm. D. Neil 

Reuben M. Colby 

Arthur N. Humiston.., 

i Peter Weatherbv 

iWm. L. W;<idl l 

Reuben M. Colbv 

I.T.B. Walk.-r . 

i Henry D. Dwk ht 

Presley >!cCafferty 

Reuben Woodmancy.... 

Joshua L. Diuilevy 

| Win. Rush 

Samuel G. Hasler 

Win. H. Nagle 

John G. Stevenson 

Caleb Taylor 

Edmund E. Nutt 

John W. .Manning 

John W. Skillen 

A. B. Godfrey , 

Newton R. Persinger... 

Thomas S. Hawley , 

Wm. L. Harrington.... 

Chaney Grimes 

C. W. McCracken 

Sylus A. Reynolds 

Daniel Fitzgerald 

Jesse L. Felt 

Wm. L. Phillips 

Jesse L. Dickensheets.. 

George Thoura 

Erastus N. Owen 

Lyman N. Ayers 

Conrad Garvis 

Henry Sherman 

Wm. H. Jacobs 

Wm. D. Neal 

Nathan Bostwick 

Henry M. Davis 

Reuben M. Colby 

Herman H. Sherwin.... 

Peter Weatherbv 

Robert J. Irwin 

Seneca Hale 

Henry 0. Dwight 

Arthur N. Humiston... 

Wm. L. Waddell 

J. B. Walker 

Samuel H. Davis 

Reuben Woodmancy...., 

Presley McCaffcrty 

Joshua L. Dunlevy 

Wm. W. McCracken.... 

Wm. Rush , 

Russell B. Neil 

Samuel G. Hasler 

Wm. H. Nagle 

Byron Selby 

John G. Stephenson 

Caleb Taylor , 

Edmund E. Nutt 

Columbus V.Johnson., 
John W. Manning , 



DATE OF RANK. 



-I) 

. I May 
J April 
|Aug. 

.Nov. 
.(Dec. 
.iJan. 



.July 

I Aug. 
June 






Oct. 
Dec. 



Feb. 



Jan. 
April 

June 

Nov. 



27, 1862 Jan. 



June 

Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb. 



11, 1865 



COM. ISSTF.D. 



27, 1862 Resigned June 28, 1863. 
1, " Promoted to Captain. 
9, Promoted to Captain. 
9, Resigned May 16, 1862. 
lo, Promoted to Captain. 
3, Promoted to Captain. 
24, Revoked. 
10, Promoted to Captain. 
12, 1863 Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 

Appointed Assistant Adj. Gen. Oct. 10, 1863. 
Declined promotion ; mustered out as Adjt. 
" ! Killed : commission returned. 



May 



25, " Honorably discharged November 1, 1864. 
20, 1864! Honorably discharged as 2d Lieutenant. 
20, " I Mustered out. 
20. " I Mustered out. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out December 18, 1864. 

Mustered out. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered out. 

Declined promotion ; mustered out as Q. 11. 

Deserted. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mnsterexi out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Dec. 16, 1861 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant February 22, 62. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out March 5, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant April 26, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
16, 1861 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned March 3, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned February 16, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Ljeutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Died April 14, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Honorably discharged April 28, 1863. 
12, L63 Honorably discharged August 19, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Appointed 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Killed. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out December 12, 1863 
22, 1864 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 



Jan. 
Dec. 



Jui 



May 



April 
May 



June 
April 



TWENTIETH OHIO INFANTEY. 1-U 



TWENTIETH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE TWENTIETH OHIO was organized for the three months service in May, 
1861, but beyond its roster, which is given in the proper place, little or nothing of its 
history or movements need be said in this connection. First-Lieutenant John C. Fry was 
soon promoted to Captain, and continued in the service, entering the three years organization 
with his company, and was made Colonel of the regiment in January, 1864. 

The reorganization took place at Camp King, near Covington, Kentucky, on the 21st of Oc 
tober, 1861. Its commander, Colonel Charles Whittlesey, a citizen of Northern Ohio, graduated 
at West Point, and for some years preceding the war was an eminent engineer and geologist, 
residing much of the time in the region of Lake Superior. He supervised and carried toward 
completion the defenses of Cincinnati, which were commenced back of Covington by General O. 
M. Mitchel. While there, and mainly under the supervision of Lieutenant-Colonel M. F. Force, 
the members of this regiment were imbued with that thoroughly soldierly spirit which adhered 
to them through all the vicissitudes of their field-service. 

During the winter of 1861 and 1862 the regiment was employed in guarding several batteries 
in the rear of Covington and Newport. Four companies were sent during the winter into an 
insurrectionary district near Warsaw, Kentucky, and on the llth of February, 1862, the entire 
regiment, with the exception of company K, embarked on the steamers Emma Duncan and Doctor 
Kane for the Cumberland Elver. 

The Twentieth arrived at Fort Donelson on the evening of the 14th of February, and was 
under fire to some extent, during the 15th. It marched to the extreme right of the army, 
was placed in reserve, and was compelled to stand a severe test in seeing crowds of stragglers fall 
ing back from the front, and in being forced to hear their wild reports of disaster and defeat; but, 
notwithstanding these discouragements, the regiment passed through its first battle with no little 
credit to every man. After the surrender of the Fort the Twentieth was sent North in charge of 
prisoners, and became scattered all over the land. By the middle of March seven companies had 
been brought together, and they proceeded up the Tennessee Eiver, on the expedition to Yellow 
Creek, on the steamer Continental, which General Sherman occupied as head-quarters. 

On the 6th of April, while on inspection in camp at Adamsville, the Twentieth heard the 
booming of the guns at Pittsburg Landing, and at 3 P. M. marched to the field, went into position 
on the right of the army, and spent a comfortless night standing in the rain. The regiment par 
ticipated in the next day s battle with considerable loss, and is fully entitled to a share in the glory 
of the victory. It was commanded during the engagement by Lieutenant-Colonel Force, Colonel 
Whittlesey being in command of a brigade. During the advance on Corinth the Twentieth 
remained on duty at Pittsburg Landing. Death and sickness held a perfect carnival in its camp, 
and it was accustomed to appear on parade with scarcely one hundred men. After the fall of 
Corinth, the regiment moved to Purdy, and there joining its division, marched to Bolivar, where 
it was left as a part of the garrison on the 6th of June, 1862. Here the health of the regiment 
improved greatly, and it was principally employed in expeditions for information or for forage. 

On the 30th of August, 1862, the Eebel General, Armstrong, with fifteen regiments marching 
to destroy railroad communications northward, was held in check the entire day by the Twentieth 



142 OHIO ix THE WAR. 

Ohio, a portion of the Seventy-Eighth Ohio, and two companies of the Second Illinois Cavalry. 
The steady fire of the skirmishers from the Twentieth Ohio did much toward restraining the 
enemy from any attack in line. Late in the afternoon two companies, G and Iv of the Twentieth 
were captured by a cavalry charge, but not until they had emptied many a saddle in repulsing 
two previous charges. This affair was considered of so much importance that Colonel M. M. 
Crocker, commanding the post of Bolivar, was promoted to Brigadier-General, to date from the 
day of the engagement. Colonel Force, Major Fry, Captain Kaga, Adjutant Owen, Lieutenants 
Ayres, Hills, and Mellick, of the Twentieth, were specially and honorably mentioned in the official 
report of Colonel Leggett, who commanded the brigade in this battle. 

The regiment assisted in driving Price from luka, on the 20th of September, and in the 
engagement between Hurlburt and Price at the crossing of the Hatchie near Metamora, Ten 
nessee, it arrived on the field at 4 P. M., with a wagon train loaded with supplies, having 
marched twenty-eight miles since 10 o clock, A. M. The supplies were immediately turned 
over and the regiment marched in pursuit of the Rebels that same night. 

On the 28th of November the regiment marched southward from Lagrange in the Second 
Brigade of Logan s Division, and on the 4th of December entered Oxford, Mississippi. The 
regiment advanced as far as Water Valley, Mississippi, and on the capture of Holly Springs 
returned northward, halting a few days at Abbeville, where, on Christmas and New Year s 
days, the men regaled themselves on dinners of parched corn. About this time the Seventeenth 
Army Corps was organized, and Logan s division became the Third Division in the corps. By 
Blow marches the Twentieth reached Memphis on the 28th of January, 1863, and there received 
an addition of two hundred recruits and drafted men. On the 22d of February the regiment 
moved down the Mississippi River on the steamer Louisiana, landed at Lake Providence, and a 
few weeks later marched to the relief of Porter s fleet, blockaded in Steele s Bayou, and after 
spending three days in the Louisiana swamps returned to its camp. The regiment arrived at 
Milliken s Bend on the 18th of April, and marched to Hard Times Landing on the Mississippi. 
It crossed the river, moved through Port Gibson, and pursued the retreating Rebels to Hawkin- 
son s Ferry on the Big Black. 

On the 12th of May the Twentieth deployed in advance of the Seventeenth Corps as it 
approached Raymond, Mississippi, and while resting with arms stacked, was fired upon from a 
dense thicket beyond a small stream. The regiment immediately formed and advanced across 
the creek, using the bank on the opposite side as a breastwork. For an hour the struggle was 
severe, and especially so to the Twentieth, as the regiments on the right withdrew their lines a 
little distance to the rear, and the flank of the Twentieth was exposed to a raking cross-fire. 
Every man stood firm until the line again advanced, and the Rebels gave way. The regiment 
lost in this engagement twelve killed and fifty-two wounded. Private Canavan, of company E, 
was promoted to a sergeantcy on the field for skillfully managing his company when all the 
officers and sergeants were struck down. Captain Wilson was decorated with the Seventeenth 
Corps Medal of Honor, in silver, for gallantry in assembling his skirmishers under the very 
muzzles of the enemy s guns in the first charge. Lieutenant Weatherby, of company A, being 
on the extreme right of the skirmish line with his company, and being cut off from his regi 
ment, assembled his company and reported to the Colonel of the nearest regiment, the Eighty- 
First Illinois, and fought as a part of that regiment till the end of the battle; when, as the com 
pany marched to join its regiment, the Eighty-First showed their appreciation of its services 
by giving three hearty cheers for the "Twentieth Ohio Boys." 

The regiment moved on through Clinton, Jackson, Bottom Depot, to Champion Hills, when 
the regiment was early pushed forward to a strong position in a ravine, under such a fire that it 
was dangerous for a staff officer to approach with orders. Though the adjoining regiments on 
each flank were pushed back as the enemy moved up in mass, the Twentieth held its ground 
without wavering till its ammunition was exhausted ; it then fixed bayonets and prepared to 
maintain its position, but the Sixty-Fifth Ohio came to its assistance from the reserve and the 
enemy was driven back. 



TWENTIETH OHIO INFANTRY. 143 

Crossing Big Black the regiment reached the rear of Vicksburg, and acted as support to the 
assaulting party on the 21st of May. The regiment did its proportion of Avork in the saps, and 
mines, and trenches, until the 29th of May; when, with the brigade, it withdrew from the line 
and accompanied an expedition to the Yazoo Valley. It returned again to Vicksburg on the 
4th of June, and was placed in reserve. On the day of its return Colonel Force was ordered to 
assume command of the Second Brigade, and was afterward promoted to Brigadier-General. 
Lieutenant Walker, acting Adjutant of the Twentieth, was made Captain and Assistant Adju 
tant-General on General Force s staff, and Lieutenant H. O. Dwight was appointed Adjutant, 
and held the position to the close of the war, declining a captaincy when it was offered to him. 
It was about this time that several of the Twentieth, who had been transferred to the Fifth 
United States Heavy Artillery (colored), passed through a severe hand-to-hand action at Mil- 
liken s Bend, in which the attacking Rebels were thoroughly defeated by the raw negro troops. 

On the 26th of June the regiment, marching with the Second Brigade, withdrew to Tiffin, 
near Black River, in order to observe the movements of Johnston. After the fall of Vicksburg 
the regiment camped at Bovina Station, on the Mississippi Southern Railroad, but was shortly 
ordered to join Sherman s army besieging Jackson. It finally returned to Vicksburg, July 30th, 
and encamped in the outskirts of the city. In the latter part of August, the Twentieth was a 
part of an expedition to Monroe, on the Ouachita River, and returned to its camp at Vicksburg, 
September 1st. On the 7th of October the regiment crossed Big Black at Messenger s Ferry, 
skirmished slightly at Boquechitto Creek, advanced toward Canton as far as Livingston, thence 
to Clinton, and then over the old Champion Hills battle-ground to Big Black and Vicksburg, 

In January, 1864, two-thirds of the men present re-enlisted, and on the 3d of February the 
regiment crossed Big Black and joined the celebrated Meridian expedition. In crossing Baker s 
Creek one of the enemy s batteries opened upon the column. The Twentieth rapidly formed in 
line, and the battery retired. The regiment was compelled to march in line until late in the 
afternoon, as the Rebels placed their battery on every hill-top and skirmished briskly along the 
road. In spite of this the head of the column passed over eighteen miles, and camped at Jack 
son that night. Passing through Brandon, the troops reached Morton, and from this point to 
Meridian the Twentieth acted as rear-guard to the whole army the greater portion of the dis 
tance. After arriving at Meridian the regiment assisted in destroying ten or fifteen miles of 
railroad, and then marched to the wagon corral on Chunkey Creek ; and, being misdirected by a 
Rebel, it marched eight miles to advance three. The next day the Rebel s house was burned, in 
order that he might remember the time he enjoyed the pleasure of misdirecting the Yankees. 

On the 20th of February the regiment marched on its return as a part of the convoy for 
seven hundred wagons. It marched by way of Hillsboro and Canton, and reached Vicksburg 
on the 4th of March. 

The regiment went North on veteran furlough ; and, after spending thirty days at their 
homes, rendezvoused at Camp Dennison on the 1st of May, and proceeded to Cairo, Illinois, and 
from there by steamer to Clifton, Tennessee. From this point it marched, via Pulaski, Hunts- 
ville, Decatur, and Rome, to Acworth, where it joined General Sherman on the 9th of June, 
after a march of two hundred and fifty miles from Clifton. In the advance from Acworth the 
Twentieth formed the escort to the wagon-train, but finally joined its brigade, on the 23d, at 
Bushy Ridge, near Kencsaw Mountain. 

On the night of the 26th the Twentieth, with its division, marched to the left of the line, 
and at eight o clock next morning moved vigorously and with great noise upon the enemy, the 
object being to divert the enemy s attention from the general assault made by the other portions 
of the National line. The division advanced to within easy range of the Rebel works, near 
Marietta, and was exposed to the concentrated fire of four batteries. Having succeeded to a cer 
tain extent in accomplishing their object, the regiment engaged in another demonstration on the 
Rebel works in front of its camp at three P. M. ; and, advancing up a thickly wooded hill till 
within one hundred yards of the enemy s works, sustained a brisk musketry tire till dark. On 
the 2d of July the regiment marched with its corps to the mouth of the Nickojack Creek, where 



144 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

the enemy was found intrenched. After the evacuation of the works at Nickojack, the regiment 
was employed in picketing the river, which was lively business, as the Rebels kept up a con 
stant and accurate fire during the day. On the 16th of July the regiment crossed the Chatta- 
hoochie at Rossville, and on the 20th reached the Rebel works before Atlanta. 

The regimerlt took position in the advanced line on the 21st, and on the 22d firing was 
heard in its rear. The regiment formed in the works; but, as the Rebels advanced, the men 
leaped the parapet and faced toward the enemy. The Rebels pressed up to and around the regi 
ment, and the bullets cams from front, flank, and rear ; and, according as the fire was hottest in 
front or rear, the men of the Twentieth leaped the works and delivered their fire in that direc 
tion. Cartridges became scarce, but portions of companies A, F, and D risked their lives and 
obtained, in the very face of the enemy, five cases of ammunition, which were piled up near the 
regimental head-quarters ; but even this supply was insufficient, and the ammunition of the 
wounded and dead was distributed, and charges were made to capture Rebels for their cartridges. 
At four o clock P. M. many of the men had only two or three cartridges left. The batteries in 
Atlanta threw shell u^pon the rear of the brigade, the enemy redoubled their fire in front, and, 
placing a captured gun within fifty paces of the flank of the Twentieth, raked the regiment with 
cannister. Orders came to withdraw from the works and form a new line, and the Twentieth 
slowly retired, the men turning now and then to fire the last cartridge at the enemy. In the 
new line the Twentieth was placed in reserve, with the exception of a detachment of about one 
hundred men, who were posted in the works on Force s Hill, and fought desperately until the 
close of the battle. In this engagement the Twentieth lost forty-four killed, fifty-six wounded, 
and fifty-four missing. Instances of personal daring were numberless, but Lieutenants 
Nuit, of company F, and Skillen, of company G, and the following named enlisted men : Crabbe 
and Casey, of company C ; Elder, of company G, and Specker and Stevenson, of company F, 
especially distinguished themselves. 

The regiment was engaged in changing position and building works until the 24th of Au 
gust, when it received orders to march as guard to the supply trains of the Army of the Ten 
nessee. Four days later the regiment joined its brigade at Fairburn, and assisted in destroying 
railroads. In the battle of Jonesboro , on the 31st, the Twentieth was on the left of the Fifteenth 
Corps, at right-angle to the main line, as " refused flank," and in this position was greatly 
annoyed by a heavy artillery fire. On the 2d of September the regiment took position on a 
hill near Lovejoy s Station, where it remained several days, exposed to some annoyance from 
the enemy s sharp-shooters, and finally settled down in camp near Atlanta, on the East Point 
Road. On the 5th of October the regiment joined the pursuit of Hood, and, after following as 
far as Galesville, Alabama, returned and camped at Smyrna Church, about twenty miles from 
Atlanta, November 5th. 

The regiment left Atlanta with Sherman s army, on the 15th of November, for Savannah. 
It participated in the destruction of the town of Millin, Georgia, and, on reaching Savannah, 
took position on the right of the Seventeenth Corps. On the 19th of December it was detached 
from the brigade and sent to the Ogeechee, near King s Bridge, where it was engaged in build 
ing wharves on which to land supplies for the army. This work was cut short by the surrender 
of Savannah, and the regiment rejoined the brigade, December 24th, in camp at the outskirts of 
the city. 

The Twentieth embarked on the steamer Fanny, on the 5th of January, 1865, proceeded to 
Beaufort, South Carolina, crossed Port Royal Ferry, and advanced until the enemy was found 
intrenched beyond a rice swamp. The Twentieth deployed as skirmishers, charged the enemy s 
works in fine style, and the regimental colors were soon waving from the parapet. At dark the 
troops encamped before the fortifications of Pocotaligo, and, on the morning of the 13th of Jan 
uary, the Twentieth was assigned camping ground beyond the railroad station of Pocotaligo, 
and remained there until the 30th of January, when it started on the Carolina campaign. 

The head of the column struck the enemy, February 13th, near the bridge across the North 
Edisto at Orangeburg. Two companies of the Twentieth were deployed as skirmishers, and 



TWENTIETH "Oino INFANTRY. 



145 



Boon the regiment advanced on the double-quick and drove the enemy back to their fortifica 
tions, which were concealed by a turn in the road, and from which the Rebels opened fire. The 
regiment deployed as skirmishers, advanced through the swamp in water icy -cold and waist deep, 
opened fire on the enemy on the opposite side, stood until late in the afternoon, and was relieved. 
Next day crossed the river and engaged in destroying the railroad. In this the National loss 
was less than the enemy s missing, wounded, or killed. Reached Columbia the night the town 
was destroyed ; the next morning marched through its smoking ruins and up the railroad, 
destroying it as far as Winnsboro . On the 24th of February was left in rear of the entire army 
to guard the pontoon train; and, after a wearisome march, entered Cheraw March 3d, and Ben- 
nettsville the Gth. The regiment moved on over miserable roads, being frequently compelled to 
lift the wagons out of the mud, hub-deep, until March 19th, then moved toward Bentonvillc, 
where it arrived at five P. M. next day. On the 21st fortified rapidly, expecting an attack, but 
the enemy withdrew, and on the 24th the regiment entered Goldsboro . After two weeks rest 
the regiment pushed ou to Raleigh, and on the 15th of April moved toward Johnston s army. 
It became known that Johnston had asked terms for a surrender ; the men seemed crazy with joy ; 
they shouted, laughed, flung their hats in the air, threw their knapsacks at each othqr, hugged 
each other, stood on their heads in the mud, and were fairly mad with delight. 

Leaving Raleigh, May 1st, the regiment marched via Richmond to Washington ; was in the 
grand review, May 24th; thence was sent to* Louisville, Kentucky, and, July 18th, back to 
Columbus, where it was mustered out of service. 



20th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



Colonel ........... 

Lt. (J.)l .nel.... 

Major ............ 

Surgeon .......... 





geo 



Ass t Si 
Captain 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



.. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do .......... 

Do ....... 

Do .......... 

1st Lieutenant 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
2d Lieutenant 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

fe 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 



THOMAS MORTOX. 



]. W. CRUIKSHANK. 

(!. N. LA.MISON 

K. 1,. HILI 

. J. BELLOWS 

M. JI. Xich 



)zro Dodds 

Thomas Morton. .. 
A. V. Thompson... 

S. R. Mott 

C. N. Lainison 

Henry Kijjby 

I. W. Cruiksharik. 

David S. Cable , 

riiomas P. Cook.... 



A. L. Harris 

M. Armstro; 
F. ( . Fry 



!. M. Hughes 

M. 1). Whelplev.... 

f. W. Satcr .". 

I>avid Gans, 

K. Arnold 

M. Armstrong 

S. E. Adams 

I. ( . Fry 

). F. Sarratt 

J. K. McDonald.... 

U. A. Taylor 

I. W. Dunn 

lames Knapp 

T. J. Hustler 

Frank Kvans 

A. L. Harris 

Thomas (irav 

W. >V. Watts 

A. O. Taylor 

E. A. James 

Janies Knapp 

W. A. 0. Meas.iey. 
,f. C. McDonald.... 

Peter <). Cain 

J. W. Pepper 

A. S. Jons , 

John A. \Vhitehidi 
A. J. Bowers 



April 



May 

April 

May 
April 



May 
April 



May 
April 



May 



June 
May 



23, 



20, 
18, 
22. 
22, 

17. 
20, 
24, 
13, 
22, 
25, 
27, 
27, 
17, 

27! 



May 



A r. 



ril 



May 
April 



May 



\pril 



May 

April 

May 



April 



May 
April 

May 

Ju.io 

May 



2.1, ISfil 

23, 

23, 

13, 

13, 

l n, 

22] 



"7 
27, 
27, 
20, 
18, 
22, 
22, 
17, 
20, 
24, 
13, 
22, 
25, 
27, 
27, 
17, 
27, 
27, 



Elected Colonel. 

Elected Major. 

Elected Lieutenant-Colonel. 



Promoted to Captain. 
Quartermaster May 27, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain. 



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned June 7, 1861. 



VOL. II. 10. 



146 



OHIO IN THE WAE. 



21st REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


NAME. 


DATE. 


ISSUED. 


Colonel 


JESSE S NORTON 


May 15 1861 


May 15 ISfil 


2d Lieutenants 






Lt. Colonel.... 
Major 


J. M. NEIBLING 
A. J. TAYLOR .. 


!j 


" 15J " 


George Foreman 


Ap.17 V,l 
lt ->(j 


Ap.17, 61 
26 


Surgeon 


WM M. E\MKS 


" 13, " 


" 13, " 


Leonard B Blinn 






Ass t Surgeon 


I). 8. VOUVG.. 


" 13, " 


" 13, " 




Mavl 


Mayl 


Captain 




Vpril IT, " 


April 17, " 




" l6 


" 16 


1)0. 


Omer C. Carr 


*T, .,.; 


26, " 


J E Stearns 




AD 23 


Do 
Do. 


Asher Cook 
Thomas G. Allen* 


May l 


May ~i 


J. J. A. Thntpp 


^2? 


p> ; 


Do 


A. V. Rice 


16, 


" 16, 


Ira M Kelsev 




" 25 


Do 


George F. Walker 


April 2", 


April 23, 




* r, - 


" 2") 


Do 
Do 


R. Henry Lovell 
A. M. Blackmail 


26, * 
" 24, 


" 26, 
" 24, 


James F. Pocock 
George 0. McPherson 


J yTs 
Ap.27 


Aug 1 .), 

" 12 


DO* ; 


Ira K. Seaman 
Samuel A. Strong 
Matthew Ewing 


;; g ; ; 

July 18, 


" 25) 
Aug. 9, 








1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


D. M. S tough ton 
James J. Voorhes 
Arnold McMahan 
Mattliew Ewingr 


April 17, 

- a 

May 1, 


April 17, 
26, " 
25, " 
May 1, " 








Do. 


P. J. Bowman 


April 27, 


April 27, " 








Do. 


Morgan I). Shafer 


" 23, 


" 23, " 








Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Joshua S. Treble 
Mattliew II. Chance 
Charles H. Vantine 
John Paul, jr 
Charles W. Allen 
Frederick R. Miller 


26, 
24, " 
" 25, " 
25, " 
Julv IS, " 
April 27, " 


" 26, " 
" 24, " 
" 25, " 
" 25, " 
Aug. 9, " 
12, " 









ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


JESSE S. NORTON Sept. 


11, 1861 


Nov. 


11, 1861 


Resigned December 20. 1862. 


Do 


JAMES M NEIBLING 


Dec 


20, 1802 


Dec 


30, 1802 




Do 


ARNOLD MCMAHAN 


July 


12. 1865 


July 


12^ 1865 


.Mustered out as Lieutenant-Colonel. 


Lt. Colonel.... 


JAMES M. NEIBLING |S-pt. 


19, 1861 


Nov. 


11, 1801 


Promoted to Colonel December 20, 1662. 


Do. .... D. M. STOVGHTON !Dec. 


2u, i4 


Dec. 


30, " 


Died of wounds November 19, 1863. 


Do ARNOLD MCMAHAN Feb. 


29, 1864 


Feb. 


29, 1864 


Promoted to Colonel. 


Do. .... WM. B. WirKF.K I.Iulv 


12, 1805 


July 


12, 1805 




Major 


S4MTTi. T A STIMV<: ^--nt. 


19, 1561 


Nov. 


11, 1801 


Resigned October 3 1^62 


Do D. M. STOUGHTON Oct. 


8, 1802 




2() , 1862 


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 


Do 


GEOKGE F. WALKKR Dec. 


20, 


Dec. 


30, " 


Resigned June 14, 1863. 


Do. .. 


ARNOLD McMAiiw 


June 


14, 1863 


Juno 


24, 1863 


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 


Do 


ISAAC CUSAC 


Feb. 


29, 1804 


Feb. 


29, 1864 


Mustered out. 


Do JOHN C. MARTIN 
Surgeon WM. M. EAMES 


July 
Sept. 


12, 1865 
19, 1861 


July 
Dec. 


12, 1865 
20, 1801 


Mustert-d out as Captain August 3, 1865. 
Resigned October 3, 1862. 


Do 


DANIEL S. YOUNG 


Oct. 


3, 1862 


4i 


18, 1802 


.Mustered out with regiment. 


Ass t Surgeon DANIEL S. YOUNG. .. 


Sept. 


19, " 


Nov. 


11, " 


Promoted to Surgeon Octobers, 1S62. 


Do. RICHAKD GKAV 


Aug. 


21, " 


Sept. 


1, " 


Mustered out June 5, 1865. 


Do. WM. C. PAYM: 


Dec. 


18 ** 


Dec. 


18, " 


Resigned August 13, 1863. 


Captain |D. M. Stoughton 
D( George F. Walker 


Sept. 


19, 1861 
19, " 


Nov. 


11, 1861 
11, " 


Promoted to Major Octobers, 1S62. 
Promoted to Major. 


Do 


Arnold McMahan 


* 


19, " 


** 


I , 


Promoted to Major. 


Do 


Silas S. Cantield 


4 


19, " 


* 


H, 


Mustered out April 1, 1365. 


Do 


Isaac Cusac 


4 


19 " 


* 4 


11, 


Promoted to Major. 


Do 


Matthew Ewing 


4 


19* " 





11, 


Resigned February 20, 1863. 


Do 


Milo Catou 


* 


la] " 


* * 


11, 


Itesignt d Jim-- 5, 1865. 


Do 


James P. Arrant* 


* 


19, || 


* * 


11, 


Resigned April 9, 1862. 


Do III. H. Alban 






44 


11, 


Honorably discharged March S, 1865. 


Do 1 David Gibbs 


* 


19*, " 


* 


Hi 


llesigned January 25, 1862. 


Do jChas. II. Vantine Feb. 
Do John C. Martin April 


8, 1862 
9, " 


Feb. 
May 


8, 18( 2 


It-signed December 10, 1863. 
Commission returned. 


Do Lewis E. Brtwstor 


I* 


9, || 


July 


*. 


It-signed May 13, 1863. 


Do JJames W. Knaggs 


Oct. 




Dec. 


30, 


Unsigned July 20, 1863; wounded. 


Do Jani -H L. Currv 


Dec. 


20, " 


Feb. 


12, 18i 3 


iesigned August 28, 1864. 


Do Charles W. Alien 


Feb. 


20, 1863 


March 


26, 


designed October 4, 1804 ; wounded. 


Do jWm. B. Wirker 


Mav 


13, " 


June 


15, 


romoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 


Do (Edward L. Baird (June 
Do Ijaiiu-s Porter Feb. 


14, " 

29, 1864 


Feb. 


29, 

29, 1864 


Declined promotion, 
declined promotion. 


Do (John C. Martin 


** 


29, " 




29, " 


romoted. 


Do 


Robert S. Munger 


* 


29, " 


* 


29, 


Declined promotion. 


Do 


.Samuel F. Cheney 


** 


29, " 


* 


29, 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 


Daniel Lewis 


* k 


29, " 


* 


29, 


villed July 21, 1864. 


Do 


John Patterson 


** 


29, " 


* 


29, 


Mustered out December 29, 1864. 


Do 


.1 anieb 1. Bumpus 


Dec. 


30, " 


Dec. 


30, 


Dismissed January 23, 1865. 


Do 


Elihu 11 Mason 


n 


30 " 




30, 


)ischarged as 1st Lieutenant May 15 1865 


Do 


Thomas Anderson Jan. 


28, 1865 


Jan. 


2$, -1865 


Ton. disc d as 1st Lieut. Jan. 23, 65; wounded 


Do 


John S. Mahoney May 


11, " 


May 


11, " 


Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant May 15, I8t>.". 


Do 


Jacob L. Kelk-r 


" 


11, " 


fc4 


11, " 


Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 
Do 


Win. Welker 


July 


12* " 


July 


18, " 
12, " 


Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant May 15, 18f>.". 


J- O 
Do 


Augustus Besanson 




12 " 




12! " 





* Killed at Scary Creek, Virginia. 



t Promoted to Captain. 



TWENTY-FIRST OlIIO INFANTRY. 



147 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


(\iptaiu 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Christian 15. Sholty 


July 

Sept. 


12, 1866 
12, " 
12, " 
12, || 

lit ISii I 
111 " 
1 y " 
1<J " 
HI " 

!; 


July 

Nov. 


12, 18C>5 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
11, 1861 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 


Mustered out a.8 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned January ft, lSf>2. 
Resigned December 5, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out September 20, 1864. 
Resigned January 21, 1862. 


Uavi.l Mcriiutock 
John 11. Bulton 


lobert F. McDonald 
John W. Pember 


1st Lieutenan 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

K: 

Du 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

1 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

K: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
-Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


John \ Williams 


Wm. Vance 


James W. Knaggs 
Win H Wicker 


Janu-s Porter* 
Matthew H. Chance 
James L. Curry 


JohnC. Martin 
< hades 11. Vantiiic 
Hubert S. M linger 
:.;eorgo 0. McPherson 

Joseph E. Steams 


Feb. 


i ] " 
, || 


Feb. 

May 

June 

July 
Feb. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

April 
May 

Feb. 

Dec. 
Jan. 

Feb. 
May 


11, " 

11, " 
11, " 
3, ISf.L 
3, 
<S 
1, 
1, 
ti, 

12 1S63 
12, " 
30, lSf,2 
30, " 
12, 1S63 
11, || 

1\ " 
2 J, " 
2J, " 
2 J, 1S64 
2 J, " 

30* " 

30, 
20, ISC) 
2, 

28, 
2S, 
I: ), 

i:, 

15, 
10, 
10, " 

11, " 

1!, " 

J,-, " 


Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered uut at expiration of service 
Resigned December 17, 1861. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 11, 62; reinstate 
Revoked. [Nov. 1,>, &. 
Died June 13, 1S63. 
Killed. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out December 27, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned Mav 21, 1863. 
Killed December 31. 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain ; discharged. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Revoked. 
Resigned January 6, 1SG5. 
Killed June 27, 1864. 
Resigned January 8, 1865. [Lieut. 
Died in prison Oct. 14, 64 ; not mustered aa 1st, 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Discharged January 31, 1865. 
Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant Feb. 8, 19f>;>. 
Resigned April 2, 1864. 
Discharged as an enlisted man. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out February 4, 1865, as 2d Lieut. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned July 3, 1865. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Discharged; wounded. 


Amos E. Wood 


Enoch 15. Wiley 
Charles W Mien 


April 
Jan. 
Dec. 
April 

Nov. 
Dec. 
Oct. 

Dec. 

Feb. 
May 


17, 1861 

J, 1862 
IS, || 

3, " 
20, " 
-, 
X), 181 3 


Edward L. Baird 
Samuel F. Clieuey 
Daniel Lewis 
Alex. A. Monroe 
Enoch B. Wiley 
John Patterson 
.James 1 Buuipus 


Elihu II. Mason 


Thomas B. Lamb 
John W. Berry 
Hubert S Dillsworth 


June 

Feb. 

Dec. 
Jan. 

Feb. 
May 


13, 
14, 
13, 

2 J, ISM 
29, 
2 J, 

29* " 
30, " 
30, " 

21, l.Sti. . 

2*1 " 
2s. " 
15, " 
10, tl 
i. i, " 
KI, " 

10, " 

11. " 
11, " 


Thomas B. Lamb 
\ra C Spaft ord 


lohn 8. Mahoney 
Facob L. Keller 
Daniel Richards 
Jeorge Cleghorn 
Wilson J Vance 


Wilson W. Brown 




Wm. Welker 




George, T. Squire 


Yugustus Besansun 


Jhristian B. Sholty 
David McClintock 
Vlestine Chochard 
Win J Henry 


:arl \V. Merry 
John 11. Bolton 
JliristopIxT Gundy 
Jobert F. Bonham 


June 
July 


20, " |Juue 

I?/ ::i ji i! y 


Jt>, 

12, 


Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 

Wounded. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. [Aug. SK, (>: . 
Appointed A. A. G. by Presid t, rank us l s.pt., 
{" romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
"ronioted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned March y. 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Appointed 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Revoked. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned February 15. 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned April 28, 1864. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out March 31, 1S65. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed September 20, 1863, at Chickamaugft. 
Hon. discharged Nov. 3, 1864; wounded, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


leiiry Grahlman 


ll l " 


" & 


Juiiicy A. Handall 


Jeremiah E. Milhoof 





12, " 


k; 


Matthew 1 . Cullican 
)scur A. Clark 


Sept, 

Feb. 

Jan. 
Feb. 
May 
April 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Dec. 

Nov. 
March 

Dec. 

April 
May- 
June 

Sept. 
Feb 


12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 

iy, isfii 
iy, " 

! ., " 

iy, " 

iy, " 
iy, " 
iy, " 
in, " 

19, " 

iy, " 

6, 1862 
8, " 
21, " 
8, 

9, 

y, 

26, 
3, 

20, | 

ixj 

20^ 
24, 1S63 
2, " 

, J " 

14, " 
14, 
2li 18(4 


Nov. 

Fob. 

May 
June 

July 

Feb. 

April 
June 

Sept. 
Feb. 


12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
11, 1S61 
11. " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
H, 
8, l,v2 
^ 
1, 
6, 
6, " 
8, " 
12, LSf.3 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
2-J, 18C.3 
8, " 
15, || 
29, 
2 J, " 
14, " 
2o, 1864. 
2y, " 
2<J, " 

2y, " 


oseph 1 uwer 


Joseph E Stearns 


Enoch B Wiley 




simon B Webber 


Jharles W Allen 




"lamuel F. Cheney 


Ylex. A. Monroe, 


Vinos E. Wood 


)aniel Lewis 
ames Blakcly 


homas Anderson 
ames I. BumptiH 
Win A Prior 


John W Berry 


I homas B. Lamb 
Ara C. Spafford 


lacob L. Keller 

Daniel Richards 


Hobert S. Dillsworth 


Hubert ButVum 
Wilson J Vance .. 


Wilson W. Brown 
John 11 PorteT. . 




fames Blak"ly 


Mark Wood 


Win. Welk -r 




2y, 

29, 
29, 


Christian B. Sholty 
David McClintock 



148 OHIO IN THE WAR. 



TWENTY-FIRST OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE TWENTY-FIRST OHIO was organized at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, on 
the 27th of April, 1861. It moved on the 23d of May, passing through Columbus, 
where it received its arms, to Gallipolis. It went into camp at that place and remained 
there until the 3d of July, when it moved to Ravenswood, by order of General McClellan, to 
re-enforce the Seventeenth Ohio, then expecting an attack from O. Jennings Wise, whose forces 
lay at a little town called Ripley, twelve or fifteen miles from the river. 

The National force under Colonel Norton, of the Twenty-First Ohio, disembarked at eleven 
o clock at night, made a forced march to Ripley, surprised the Rebels and drove them from the 
place. The expedition then returned by steamer to Gallipolis. A day or two after this Colonel 
Norton made a reconnoissance up the Kanawha River, and captured forty prominent Rebel citi 
zens as hostages for the good treatment and safe return of some loyal Virginians captured by the 
notorious Jenkins. Colonel Norton also led an expedition to Jenkins s farm, just below Guy- 
andotte, consisting of company F, Captain George F. Walker, and company C, Lieutenant A. 
McMahan, and captured a steamboat load of cattle, horses, corn, etc., for the use of the army, 
and once more returned to their camp at Gallipolis. 

On the llth of July General Cox took command of the brigade, consisting of the Eleventh, 
Twelfth, and Twenty-First Ohio, the First and Second Kentucky, Cotter s First Ohio Battery of 
two guns, and Captain George s cavalry, and marched to Red House, on the Kanawha River. 
At this place Colonel Norton was ordered to make a reconnoissance for the purpose of discov 
ering the Rebel position. Company F, Captain George F. Walker; company II, Captain A. M. 
Blackman, and company G, Captain Lovell, with a portion of Captain George s cavalry, started, 
under command of Colonel Norton, early on Sunday morning, the 14th of July, moving on 
three different roads, all terminating at a little village on Scarey Creek, where it empties into 
the Kanawha River. After marching some eight miles the enemy s pickets were encountered 
in a church, from which they fired and fell back on their main body. Skirmishers were thrown 
out by Colonel Norton, which developed the enemy in force on the opposite bank of the creek, 
occupying a strong position, with a full battery. 

After developing the strength of the Rebels, the National troops fell back two miles, and at 
twelve o clock that night were re-enforced by the remaining companies of the Twenty-First Ohio 
and part of the Second Kentucky, under Lieutenant-Colonel Enyart; but, lacking artillery, 
Colonel Norton thought it best to fall back and await the arrival of the main body. On the 15th 
the main body, under General Cox, arrived, and, on the morning of the 17th, Colonel Lowe was 
placed in command of a force > consisting of his own regiment ; company K, Captain S. A. 
Strong, and company D, Captain Thomas G. Allen, of the Twenty-First ; Captain Cotter s two 
rifled guns, and a portion of Captain George s cavalry, as an attacking column, and ordered to 
drive the enemy from his position. The light opened at great disadvantage to the Nationals, 
from the fact that their old United States smooth-bore muskets did not carry far enough to 
reach the enemy, who were stationed in the bed of the creek and protected by its high banks. 
Colonel Norton seeing the disadvantage, determined to drive the enemy out of the creek with 



TWENTY-FIRST OlIIO INFANTRY. 149 

the bayonet, and, as a preliminary movement, sent a flanking force to turn the enemy s left, and 
divert his attention from the contemplated charge in front. The charge was successfully made 
by Colonel Norton, Avith two companies of the Twelfth Ohio under Lieutenant-Colonel White, 
and two companies of the Twenty-First Ohio, the enemy being lifted out of the creek, and the 
whole Rebel force driven back. Colonel Norton was severely wounded through the hips in this 
afl air, but remained on the field, hoping to be supported by Colonel Lowe. Three messengers 
were dispatched to Colonel Lowe, one of whom was killed, but the needed support was not 
given. In the meantime the enemy received re-enforcements; and, discovering that the Na 
tional force was not properly supported, again advanced their column, and in turn drove them, 
capturing Colonel Norton and Lieutenant Brown, of the Twelfth Ohio, who had remained with 
Colonel Norton and the other wounded. 

The loss in this engagement was nine killed, including Captain Allen and Lieutenant Poin- 
eroy, of company D, and seventeen wounded. 

On the evening of the battle, Colonel Woodruff, of the Second Kentucky ; Colonel De Vil- 
liers, of the Eleventh Ohio, and Lieutenant-Colonel George W. Neft* of the First Kentucky, 
rode up to the battle-ground by a different road from that on which the troops were retreating, 
and were instantly made prisoners by the Rebels. 

The Twenty-First Ohio remained in the field, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Neib- 
ling, until ordered home to be mustered out, which occurred on the 12th of August, 1861, at Co 
lumbus, Ohio. It was again reorganized, on the 19th of September, 1861, for the three years 
campaign, and mustered into the service at Findlay, Ohio. It received marching orders a few 
days thereafter, was supplied with arms at Camp Dennison on the 2d of October, and marched 
the same day for Nicholasville, Kentucky. It remained there ten days, and was then ordered to 
march to McCormick s Gap to join General NeLson, then in command at that point. 

During that campaign no engagement occurred, excepting that at Ivy Mountain, in which 
the Rebels attempted an ambush, but were foiled and whipped, mainly through a flank move 
ment executed by the Twenty-First Ohio. The Rebels were driven from that line, and the whole 
command returned to Louisville, reaching that city in November. 

The National army was reorganized in the following December, under General Buell, and 
moved to Bacon Creek and Green River, where it remained in winter-quarters up to late in 
February. In General O. M. Mitchel s division the Twenty-First marched on Bowling Green, 
driving the Rebels from that strong position. Then moving direct on Nashville, General Mitchel 
summoned the city authorities to surrender, which demand was promptly acceded to. Colonel 
Kenneti, of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry, took possession of the city on the 13th of March. 

On the 17th General Mitchel s column moved out on the Murfrcesboro turnpike, occupied 
Murfreesboro on the 19th, and remained there until the 4th of April, when it moved on Ilunts- 
ville. At this point the famous expedition under Andrews, a citizen of Kentucky, was sent out 
to sever the Rebel communication with Richmond, so as to prevent re-enforcements from reach 
ing Beauregard. This was made up from the Twenty-First, Thirty-Third, and Second Ohio, 
and consisted of twenty-four men. It failed by reason of meeting trains on the road not specified 
in the time-table in possession of Andrews. 

From Fayetteville the command moved, on the morning of the 10th of April, for Huntsville, 
and reached that, place on the morning of the llth, drove the Rebels out, captured three hun 
dred prisoners, sixteen locomotives, and a large number of freight and passenger cars. 

The most vigorous measures were then inaugurated by General Mitchel. Expeditions were 
sent in every direction, railroad bridges burned, and every precaution taken against surprise. 
One of these, which consisted of company C, Captain McMahan, and company F, Captain 1J. H. 
Alban, of the Twenty-First, and a portion of the Thirty-Third Ohio, all under command of 
Colonel Oscar F. Moore, of the Thirty-Third, was sent to Stevenson, Alabama, to burn an important 
bridge spanning the Tennessee River. It was completely successful, and returned to Huntsville. 

About the 20th of April Captain Milo Caton, company II, of the Twenty-First Ohio, waa 
sent in charge of Rebel prisoners to Nashville. On his return he was surrounded by Morgan s 



150 OHIO ix THE WAR. 

cavalry, and, after a hard fight, the Captain and his company were obliged to surrender. The 
whole party were sent to Blchmond. Captain Caton remained in Rebel prisons over a year. On 
the 28th of May the regiment moved to Athens to relieve Colonel Turchin, and remained there 
up to the 28th of August. While the Twenty-First Ohio was at Athens the nucleus of the First 
Alabama loyal regiment was formed, mainly through the efforts of Captain McMahan. 

The regiment returned from Athens, Alabama, to Nashville, on the 29th of August, 1862, 
and arrived on the 2d of September. It remained with its division, under the command of 
Brigadier-General James S. Negley, and was besieged in the city until the 7th of November, 
when the siege was raised by the approach of the army under General Rosecrans. During the 
siege the Twenty-First Ohio was engaged in the sallies of Lavergne, White s Creek, Wilson s 
Bend, and Franklin Pike. At Lavergne the regiment captured a part of the Third Alabama 
Rifle Regiment, with their colors and, camp and garrison equipage, and fifty-four horses. 

On the 19th of November General Rosecrans issued a special order, complimenting this regi 
ment for its efficiency on the grand guard around Nashville. 

On the 26th of December the Twenty-First Ohio moved with the army against the enemy at 
Murfreesboro . Skirmishing continued incessantly until December 31st, when a general battle 
commenced and continued until January 3d. The Twenty-First Ohio was engaged every day 
first in the center, and (January 2d) on the left of the army. In the battle of January 2d, with 
the Rebels under Breckinridge, the Twenty-First charged across Stone River, the water being 
waist-deep, and captured three brass field-pieces, the only artillery captured in the battle before 
Murfreesboro . After the battle, Captain A. McMahan, of company C, was recommended to the 
Governor of Ohio for promotion by General James S. Negley, and was soon afterward appointed 
Major of his regiment. On the 4th of January the Twenty-First entered Murfreesboro , having 
the advance of its division. 

In the battle of Stone River the regiment lost one officer, Lieutenant Enoch B. Wiley, of 
company C, and forty-six men killed, and Lieutenant J. W. Knaggs and seventy-five men 
wounded. Seventeen men were captured. 

During the occupation of Murfreesboro , from January 4th to June 24th, 1863, the Twenty- 
First was engaged in several expeditions and skirmishes. On the 24th of June it moved with 
the army upon the enemy at Tullahoma. The enemy having retired upon Chattanooga, the 
Twenty-First went into camp with the army at Decherd Station on the 7th of July. On the 
16th of August, it crossed the Tennessee River near Stevenson, and dragging its artillery and 
trains over Lookout Mountain by hand, it found the enemy at Dug Gap, Georgia, on the llth 
of September. 

Heavy skirmishing continued until the 19th, when the enemy was found in force on the 
line of Chickamauga Creek. The regiment immediately deployed into line of battle, under 
command of Lieutenant-Colonel D. M. Stoughton, and, opened a brisk fire upon the Rebels, 
which continued until night. Early the next morning (Sunday, September 20th) the battle 
was resumed. At eleven o clock the Twenty-First was posted on Horseshoe Ridge, upon the 
earnest request of Brigadier-General J. M. Brannon, who retired with his troops to another part 
of the field soon afterward. Immediately after forming in this new position, the Twenty-First 
became fully engaged, and a severe contest resulted in the repulse of the enemy, not, however, 
without severe loss to the Twenty-First. Lieutenant-Colonel Stoughton had, an arm fractured 
and soon after died. The command now devolved upon Major A. McMahan. 

The result of the battle, by three o clock in the afternoon, demonstrated the inability of 
the National army to meet successfully the immensely superior numbers under command of 
General Bragg. The National troops were forced back on the right and left ; but the Twenty- 
First, being armed with Colt s revolving rifles, continued to hold its position. The Rebels 
charged upon the regiment in this position five times without successs, retiring each time with 
severe loss. An hour before sundown a full battery was brought to bear upon it, inflicting severe 
damage. Under cover of the smoke of this battery the Rebels charged again, but were met 
with a volley and a counter-charge, and the Twenty-First continued to hold its position. 



TWENTY-FIRST OHIO INFANTRY. 151 

The scene at this time was horrible. The battery had set fire to the leaves and dry brush, 
and the dead and wounded were consumed by the fire. To remedy this was out of the question. 
To detain the Rebels, if possible, was all that could be expected while the troops of McCook s 
corps, which had been so severely crushed, could effect a retreat. The ammunition was now 
nearly exhausted, and a further supply could not be found nearer than Chattanooga, nearly a 
day s march distant. The cartridge-boxes of the dead were searched, and also the hospitals, for 
any that might be carried there in the cartridge-boxes of the wounded. By economy the regi 
ment continued to fire until dark, when its last shot was expended. At this time the enemy had 
appeared upon the right and rear, and the regiment, now greatly reduced in numbers, was formed 
for one more desperate effort to hold the ridge and give time for our shattered columns to effect a 
retreat. A charge was ordered by Major McMahan, and, though entirely without ammunition, 
the bayonet was applied with entire success. The enemy was forced back, leaving nine prisoners 
with the Twenty-First Ohio. 

The helpless condition of the regiment was discovered by the enemy in its inability to 
return their fire. It was now after dark, and, in a second attempt to push back the enemy with 
the., bayonet, the Twenty-First Ohio was overwhelmed, and Major McMahan and one hundred 
and fifteen of the officers and men of the command were captured. The Twenty-First Ohio 
expended, in this battle, forty-three thousand five hundred and fifty rounds of Colt s fixed am 
munition, and sustained a loss of one officer and fifty men killed, three officers and ninety-eight 
men wounded, and twelve officers and one hundred and four men captured. 

The survivors of the regiment retired with the army to Chattanooga, where it arrived Sep 
tember 22d, and remained until January 1, 1864, when it re-enlisted as a veteran organization, 
mainly through the efforts of Quartermaster Daniel Lewis, Quartermaster-Sergeant Geo. Sheets, 
and the non-commissioned officers of the regiment, and returned to Ohio upon veteran furlough. 
It had in the meantime, however, been present at the battle of Mission Ridge. 

The regiment returned to Chattanooga on the Gth of March and moved forward to Ringgold, 
Georgia, from which point it moved, May 7th, with Sherman s grand army upon the campaign to 
Atlanta, Georgia. Fighting soon commenced, and the regiment opened its veteran campaign with 
the battle of Buzzard s Roost, May 9th, and Resaca, May 15th. Moving forward the regiment was 
present at the battle of New Hope Church, and on the morning of May 28th, while the regiment. 
was moving to a position in reserve, a piece of stray shell fractured the right arm of Colonel 
James M. Neibling, and the command of the regiment again devolved upon Major A. McMahan, 
who had just returned from Libby Prison. 

The regiment was immediately ordered to the front, and in capturing a ridge which was 
abandoned without a fight on the evening before, company K sustained a loss of four men killed 
and two wounded. The position thus captured commanded that of the enemy, and was held by 
the Twenty-First Ohio until the enemy withdrew. 

Skirmishing continued daily until the enemy presented front at Kcnesaw Mountain, June 
17th. The Twenty-First was engaged at this point every day, holding the front line at Bald 
Knob, twelve days and nights in succession, at which point Lieutenant Robert S. Dilworth, 
of company G, and two men were killed and ten men wounded. On the 4th of July the 
regiment marched through Marietta in pursuit of the enemy, who had retired toward the 
Chattahoochie River the previous night. Skirmishing continued until the 9th of July, when 
the regiment was ordered forward to learn the position of the enemy, with orders to attack and 
drive in his outposts. A severe engagement at Vining s Station was the result. Two regi 
ments of the enemy, the Fourth Mississippi and Fifty-Fourth Louisiana Infantry, were encount 
ered in their rifle-pits. A charge was ordered by Major McMahan, the rifle-pits captured, 
with seventeen prisoners and thirty-three Mand of new English rifles. The enemy was driven 
into his main works after a desperate struggle, in which the Twenty-First Ohio lost fifteen men 
killed, and two officers and thirty-seven men wounded, and one officer missing. 

The regiment continued to hold the rifle-pits and aiyioy the enemy in his main works. 
Corporal William Waltman, of company G, upon this occasion led his company in the charge, 



152 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

i 

and would have been promoted had not his term of enlistment expired before his commission 
could be obtained. Early in the morning of July 10th the enemy withdrew, and the regiment 
advanced by daylight to the Chattahoochie River. No other troops besides the Twenty-First 
Ohio were engaged on this occasion. 

Having crossed the river, the regiment again engaged the enemy at Nancy s Creek, July 
19th, and continued to engage him until July 20th, when the battle of Peach Tree Creek was 
fought. In this battle Captain Daniel Lewis, company C, was killed, Sergeant-Major Earll W. 
Merry was wounded, and had a leg amputated. 

On the 22d of July the siege of Atlanta was commenced, and continued until the night of 
September 1st, when the defense of that city Avas abandoned by the enemy in consequence of his 
defeat at Jonesboro , thirty-live miles south of Atlanta. The Twenty-first Ohio during the siege 
of Atlanta was engaged with the enemy on several occasions, and was under his fire every day. 

At the battle of Jonesboro , Georgia, September 1st, which won Atlanta, the regiment was 
again engaged, and again added new laurels to its character as a fighting regiment. Its loss in 
this battle was five men killed, thirty men wounded, and one man missing. After the battle of 
Jonesboro the Twenty-First returned with the army to Atlanta, and went into camp on the 8th 
of September. The total loss of the regiment in this campaign, from May 7th to the occupation 
of Atlanta, September 2d, was two officers and thirty-two men killed, and five officers and one 
hundred and nineteen men wounded, many of whom subsequently died. 

On the 3d of October the regiment moved with the army in pursuit of Hood toward Chatta 
nooga, and arrived at Galesville, Alabama, October 20th. From this point it returned to Atlanta, 
where it again arrived on the 15th of November. On the 16th it moved with the army in the 
direction of Savannah, Georgia. On the 4th of December it was engaged with the enemy near 
Lumpkin Station, on the Augusta and Savannah Railroad. From the 12th to the night of the 
20th of December it was engaged with the enemy s outposts before Savannah, and entered the 
city the following morning at nine o clock A. M., in advance of its army corps. 

During this campaign the regiment destroyed three miles of railroad and captured eight 
thousand rations for its own use. It also captured forage to supply twenty-one head of horses 
and mules attached to the regiment during the campaign. Six prisoners of war were also cap 
tured. The regiment lost one man wounded, and fourteen men were "bush-whacked" by the 
enemy. 

The regiment moved again from Savannah, Georgia,. under command of Lieutenant-Colonel 
McMahan upon the campaign through North and South Carolina. It was engaged at Roeky 
Mount, South Carolina, and subsequently at Averysboro , North Carolina, and participated in 
the battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, on the 19th of March. In this battle it sustained a 
loss of one man killed and one officer, Captain W. B. Wicker, of company E, and four men 
Wounded, and ten men missing. On this campaign a large amount of railroad was destroyed by 
this regiment, and it drew its subsistence entirely from the country through which it passed, and 
also supplied the horses and mules which belonged to it with sufficient forage. Twenty-one 
Rebel prisoners were captured by the regiment during this campaign. 

During the battle on the 19th of March at Bentonville, Lieutenant-Colonel McMahan was 
assigned to the command of his brigade, and Captain Samuel F. Cheney, of company B, to the 
command of the Twenty-First Ohio. This was the last hostile meeting of this regiment with the 
enemy. The Rebels retired rapidly from Goldsboro through Raleigh, North Carolina, the regi 
ment marching through that city on the 12th of April, 1865, and moved forward to Martha s 
Vineyard, where it remained until the Confederate forces under General Joseph E. Johnston laid 
down their arms and dispersed. The regiment then returned to Washington via Richmond, 
Virginia, and was present at the grand review on the 26th day of May, 1865. It then pro 
ceeded to Louisville, Kentucky, where it was mustered out of service, and from there returned to 
Columbus, Ohio, where it was finally discharged and paid on the 28th day of July. 



TWENTY-SECOND OHIO INFANTRY. 



153 



22d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 


WM. E. GILMORE 
JOHN A. FIXI.KY 
JULIUS A. PENN 


May 

June 

May 

April 


23, 1861 

1 :: 

29, " 
2S, " 
2.-., " 
23, 
2- , 
2 J, 


May 

June 

Mav 

April 


23, 1861 
23, " 
23, " 
13, " 
29, " 
2S, " 
25, " 
23, " 
22, || 


Resigned. 


Surgeon 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Captain 

1)0 


DOUGLASS DAY 
ISAAC L. CRANK. 
JULIUS R SCHENCK 


George F. Reed 


Do 
Do 


Solomon S. Robinson 
Jesse D. Applt-r 


Do 


George W. Hulick 


May 

April 

May 

April 

May 
April 

June 
May 
April 

May 
April 
May 


25, 
20, 
2.3, | 

23 
24, 

2 >, 

23, 
23. - ; 
22, 
23, 
20, 
25, | 

2t! 
24, 
*, 
2:>, 
23, 
23, | 

20J 
25, 

23; " 
24, " 
24, " 


May- 
April 

Mav 

April 

May 
April 

Tune 
Mav 

April 

M;ay 
April 
May 


25, " 
20, 
25, 

2, 
23, 
24, 
25, 

H; : 

22. 
23, 
20, 
25, 
2, 
24, " 
24, " 
14, " 

23 j " 
23, " 
22, " 
23, " 
20, " 

"2! " 
23, " 
24, " 
24, " 


Do 
Do 
Do. 


John M. Bell 
George Wei helm 
Nathan Pickctt 


Do 




Do 


Win. T. Pavne 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 

gi: 
BS: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Alexander C. Maitlaml 
Julius C. Steadman 
John II. Nugent 
Oliver Wood 


Edward Links 


Charles A White.. 


Henj L Tryer 


Benj G Harrison 


Robert L McKinley 




E M Hall 


Chas. H. Shult/, 
Horace W. Deshler 
James II. Blackburn 
John C Collins . . .. 


Lowell II Smith 




Francis M Mills 


George W. Rutledge 
Jackson Woodson 
Henry W. Rayburu 
\V. H. Brown 





ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE ( 


F RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 

Major 
Do. 


CRAFTS J. WRIGHT 
OLIVER WOOD 
J. T. ST. JAMES 
BENJ. T. WRIGHT 
HOMER TIIKALI 
C. W. ANDERSON 

( >LI VFH WOOD .. . 


Aug. 

Sept, 

Mav 

Sept . 

Mav 
Sept. 

Feb. " 
Aug. 

Nov 
Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

April 
May 

Aug. 
Sept. 
May 
Sept. 

June 


3, 1861 
16, 

20, " 
9, 1862 

.... 1861 
19, 1862 
27, 1861 
21, 1862 
6, 1861 
9, " 
21, " 
20, " 
21, " 

18, || 

10 " 

30, II 
It || 

11, 1862 
6, " 
16, " 
16, " 
27. " 


Oct. 
Nov. 
Aug. 

Nov. 
Aug. 

Nov. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Oct. 
Nov. 

Dec. 


17, 1861 
12, 1862 
f>, " 

31) , 
3<l , | 

[>] " 
5, || 

*>! 
*>! 


Resigned September J, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Died April 8, 1862. 
Resigned September 9, 1S62. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned May 9, 1SC2. 

.Mustered out. 
Resigned February 11, 18C2. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Surgeon 68th 0. V. I. 
Resigned Mav 24, 1863. 
It-signed May 21. 1S62. 
Resigned Mav 6, 18.12. 
Promoted to Major Mav 9, 1862. 
Promoted to Major May 1, 1862. 
Promoted to Major September 16, 1862. 
Killed June 27, 1862. 
Died February 10, 1862. 
Honorably discharged September 11, 1862. 
Mustered out, 
Died April 11, 1862. 
Resigned February 1, 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 


Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 


GEORGE R. FRENCH 
JOHN B. BKLI 
H. E. FOOTK 
\ M BROWN 


W H GIIMORF 


C K B\RH 


Captain 


John II Fox 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


Oliver Wood 
Benj F. Wright 


Homer Thrall 


George II. Lemley 
Wm/W. Sosman 


Do 

Do. 

DO ; 

Do 
Do. 

DO ;: 

Do. 


A J Hall 


Thomas C. Mitchell 
George R. French 
( banning Richards 
John Crai"han 


1; :: 

3d, || 
26. " 


Resigned July 17, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out. 
M ustered out, 
M ustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned as 1st Lieut. March 12, 1S63; revoked. 
Commission returned. 


Charles W. Miner 
John Birch 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


( banning Richards, jr 
Win. C. Miller 
Win. Govett 
J. T. Campbell 
Jacob Xwiedler 
Win. Ambrose 



154 



OHIO IN THE WAR 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUF.D. 


REMARKS. 




W E Fnv 


Sept. 16, 1862 

Jan. 27, " 
Aug. 9, 1861 

s r pt. .;, ;; 

Nov. 5, " 
Sept. 3, " 
Oct. 1, " 
Aug. is, " 


April 28, if- 
June 13, 
Aug. ft, 1 

! r >! 

i>. 
ft, 
* - r >, 


>3 
2 


Mustered <jut. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned April 18, l!SR2. 
Resigned February 11, 1SR2. 
Resigned July 14, 1862. 
Mustered out June 25, 1862. 
Resigned February 25, 1861. 
Dismissed December 21, 1862. 
Promoted Sept. 16; resigned March 12, 1SK3. 


Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
3d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do! 


Wm. E. Lock wood 
Win. Govett 
Charles A. Burton 
E. F. Smith 


George V. Asker 
Daniel Showman 
Pleasant W. Frogge 
Win Ambrose 


Jacob ZwRxller i<>ct. 3, " 


George 11. French \ug. 2?,, " 

E Kennor Anril IS lM , > 


^, 

| 5, 

|! 5, 




Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned April 16, 1*62. 
Resigned March 16, 1862. 
Resigned .Mav 14, I.sti2. 
Promoted to Captain. 


( banning Richards 
Robert McGregor 
James Ferris 
John Birch 


Jan. 11, " 
Feb. 10, || 

Fub! l! " 
Aug. -20, 1S61 


W. E. Fav 


John 8. SlcClinVock 
Martin Beim 


Mav 6, 1862 
Feb. 11, 
July 14, 
June 25, 
April 16, 
.March K>, 
Oct. 6. " 
May 14, " 


Nov. 30, 
" 30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
" 30, 
D.-c. 2ti, 




Mustered out. 
Honorably discharged October 21, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Revoked. 
Revoked. 


Edwin E. Thomas 
Win. E. Lockwoud 
Edward Walcott 
James W. Whitehcad 
Larkin II Morelund.. .. 


Alvis Fisher 


Eugene Armour 
Daniel J Hvten"er 


Hi, " 
16, " 


April 28 
May 11 
June 3 
Jan. 18 
Feb. 1 
Dec. 21 
Aug. 5 

" . : 

5 

5 

" ."j 
" f> 
" ft 
" 5 
" 5 
" ft 

" 5 

Sept. 11 
17 
March 30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
Jan. 20, 
Mav 11 
April 28 
Jan. Ifi 
May 18 


1* 

1 

1M 

18 
Iti 


4 

3 

M 

>,"> 


Resigned July 11, 1S53. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant May 6, 1862. 
Resigned January 8, 1862. 
Resigned March ft. 1862. 
it. -signed April 18, 1862. 
Resigned September 3, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned July 1, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned January 17, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned August 14, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 

Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 






Jacob A. Prit/ 


.Jan. 27, " 


John Buxton 


Dec. 21, 1864 
Aug. y, l.-r.l 
Sept. , " 
Nov. 5, " 
Sept. 3, " 


J 8 McClintock 


John W. Wallace 
J. 8. Delavie 
A. G. Dinsmore 
Wm S-uid-i 


W. (J. Miller 
Alvis Fisher 
John Craighan 
John Birch 
E. Kesner 
Martin Beim 


Oct. 31, 
12, 
1. 
Sept. G, 
Jan. s, 
Mav 1, 
Oct. 20, 
Jan. 2ij, 
Feb. 10, 
March 16, 1862 
Feb. 1, " 
April 18, " 

LS " 

Oct. 3, 1861 
Mav C>, 18i ,2 
F.-b. 11, " 
March 16, " 
Oct. ti, " 
June 2:>, " 
Sept, 11, " 
Iti, 1SC.2 
16, " 
March 12, 1863 
Jan. 7, 1864 
May 18, 18<w 


Thomas J. Roads 
Hubert McGregor 
J T Campbell 


James Whitchead 
L. Moreland 
Edwanl W. Thomas 


Wm. E. Lockwood 


Eugene Armour 
John Christie 


John Bnxton 


John It. Browuell 
Joseph D. Emory 


Alexander C. Barr 


Moses H. White ,.. 
Thomas A. Pollock 
Jacob Day 


Henry Digby 







TWENTY-SECOND OHIO INFANTRY. 155 



TWENTY-SECOND OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE TWENTY-SECOND OHIO VOLUNTEEE INFANTKY was one of 
the offshoots of the appointment of Major-General John C. Fremont to the command 
of the Western Department. Its place of organization was Benton Barracks, near St. 
Louis, Missouri. Although officered by Ohio men, and its ranks filled mainly from the coun 
ties of the " Buckeye State," it was organized originally under the name of the Thirteenth 
Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and mustered into the service November 5th, 1861. It started to 
the field as a Missouri regiment, on the 26th of January, 1862, with the Colonel, three of the 
other field-officers, and eight of the Captains from Ohio. 

On the 26th of January, 1862, the regiment received orders to proceed by rail and transports 
to Cairo, Illinois, and there report to Brigadier-General Grant, then commanding that district. 
On its arrival at Cairo it was met by orders to proceed to Smithland, Kentucky, reporting to 
Colonel Lanman, commanding that post. On its arrival at Smithland, the men had barely 
time to get camp and garrison equipage to the place selected for their camp, when orders came 
to prepare three days rations and march in light order to support a cavalry reconnoissance then 
in progress toward Fort Henry. This movement was made on the 31st of January. After 
marching nearly two days the cavalry force was met on its return, and the next morning the 
regiment started back to Smithland, having carried out the intent of their instructions. This 
march was the first experience of the regiment in field-service ; and, owing to a sudden change 
of weather from summer to winter, its initiation was quite severe. 

Orders were found awaiting the regiment at Smithland, to proceed by transports up the 
Tennessee River, as a part of the investing force against Fort Henry. It was found, however, 
on its arrival at Fort Henry that General Grant was already in possession of that fort, and was 
busily engaged in organizing the army for an attack on Fort Donelson. In the organization of 
this force the Thirteenth Missouri was brigaded in General C. F. Smith s Division. In the first 
attack the position of the regiment was near the left of the line, and as the heavy fighting took 
place on the right they were not exposed to much danger. On the 15th, when General Smith 
assaulted the enemy s works on the right, the regiment was in position near the center, two miles 
from the point of assault, Receiving orders to report at once to the left the men dropped their 
knapsacks, blankets, overcoats, in fact everything but their arms and ammunition, and reported 
on the " double-quick " to the General. Lanman s brigade had charged, and were now holding 
the outer works under a storm of grape and canister from the enemy s heavy batteries. 

Night found the regiment in a position to support Lanman. During the night orders came 
directing the regiment to prepare for storming the batteries at day-break of the ensuing 
morning. The dawn found the regiment in front of Lanman s advanced position. Everything 
was in readiness, and all ears anxiously waiting to hear the signal to charge given. But the 
Rebel batteries were silent, eliciting many surmises as to the reason. Presently a sound from 
the interior of the fort attracted all eyes in that direction the white flag of surrender was dip- 
covered floating from the principal work. 

After occupying the fort for a few days orders were received to proceed to Clarksville, thenc* 
to Nashville, thence back to Clarksville. From Clarksville the next move was to Pittsburg 



156 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

Landing, where the regiment arrived on the 20th of March. It lay in camp until the morning 
of the 6th of April, the day of the commencement of the battle of Shiloh, when it was ordered 
into line of battle. The numerical force of the regiment at this time was four hundred and fifty 
officers and men. During the two days of that well-contested battle the regiment was warmly 
engaged, and lost in killed and wounded eighty-nine officers and men. Early in the first day s 
fight the gallant Lieutenant-Colonel St. James fell mortally wounded. (About this time several 
changes occurred in the staff. Major C. W. Anderson resigned, and Captains Wright and Wood 
were promoted, the first to the position of Lieutenant-Colonel, the latter to that of Major. Sur 
geon Bell had resigned, and his place filled by Doctor Henry E. Foote, of Cincinnati.) 

In the slow and tedious advance on Corinth, succeeding the battle of Shiloh, the regiment 
was continually in the front, and on the evacuation of Corinth by the enemy marched with the 
army to Booneville, Mississippi, in pursuit, and then returned to Corinth. 

On the 7th of July, 1862, the Secretary of War, recognizing the absurdity of designating the 
regiment by an erroneous title, issued an order transferring the Thirteenth Missouri Volunteers 
to the State of Ohio, to be named the Twenty-Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

The long sojourn of our troops at Corinth was terminated about the 17th of September, 1862. 
At that time the Twenty-Second Ohio moved with the army upon luka, Mississippi, where the 
Rebel General Price was in force. Nothing of interest, however, occurred on this expedition, 
that is, so far as the regiment was concerned. 

On the 16th of September, 1862, Colonel Crafts J. Wright and Lieutenant-Colonel Wright 
tendered their resignations, which were accepted. This left the regiment under the command of 
Major Wood. 

October 3d came before the calm was broken at Corinth. On that memorable day the Rebel 
Generals Price and Van Dorn appeared before the place, eager to secure the post of Corinth and 
the vast supplies collected there. The Rebels were confident of an easy victory and the capture 
of the place. Major-General Rosecrans, commanding the National forces, was perfect master of 
the situation. He allowed the overconfident Rebels to precipitate themselves completely within 
the trap he had so ingeniously prepared for them, and although the enemy at one time threatened 
to " carry off the trap," they were soundly thrashed, and sent reeling into the swamps and bayous 
of Mississippi. The Twenty-Second did not participate in this sanguinary struggle, having been 
detailed for post duty. The regimeat joined in the pursuit of the Rebels, but, like the whole 
army engaged in that fruitless race, gained no laurels. 

Two months passed away without action. In December, 1862, the. Rebel General Forrest 
made a raid upon the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, one of the channels of communications of luka 
with the outer world. By mistake the Twenty-Second was sent to look after Forrest, supposing 
the regiment belonged to the Ohio brigade. The error was not rectified before reaching Trenton, 
at whic"h place it was left as garrison and railroad guard. Again occurred a quiet of two or 
three months, nothing more exciting occurring than an occasional scout for guerrillas, from 
which the detachments sent out generally returned successful. Whilst at Trenton a detachment 
of the Twenty-Second captured the notorious guerrilla chief Colonel Dawson, who afterward died 
in the Alton (Illinois) penitentiary. 

March llth, 1863, brought orders for the regiment to evacuate the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, 
and report at Jackson, Tennessee. It was ordered back to Corinth April 29th, and returned to 
Jackson, Tennessee, May 3d, 1863. May 29th it was ordered to move by rail to Memphis, and 
on arrival there found preparations being made to move to the vicinity of Vicksburg. On the 
1st of June the regiment embarked on transports for Haincs s Bluff, on the Yazoo River. It 
arrived there on the 3d of June, and was engaged in throwing up earthworks until July 16th, 
when orders were received to report at Helena, Arkansas. General Steele was engaged at this 
point in organizing the Army of the Arkansas. The Twenty-Second Ohio was made part of this 
organization, and on the 13th of August, 1863, left Helena with the army for Little Rock. 
After marching twenty-nine days the National forces entered the Capital of Arkansas with but 
slight difficulty, tne cavalry arm of the expedition bearing the brunt of all opposition. 



TWENTY-SECOND OHIO INFANTRY.* 157 

The occupation of Little Eock occurred on September 10th, 1863, and from that time to 
October 28th the Twenty-Second remained there, when orders were issued for the regiment to 
proceed to Brownsville, Arkansas, to aid in guarding the railroad connecting Little Rock and 
Duvall s Bluff. Nearly one year was consumed in this duty, remaining at Brownsville from 
October 30th, 1863, until October 26th, 1864. During the whole of this time nothing of impor 
tance occurred, with the exception of a few dashes after guerrillas. These outlaws were peculiarly 
brutal in Arkansas veritable murderers real Cain-marked scoundrels, who scrupled at nothing 
in the way of cruelty and outrage. The Twe nty-Second, as a general thing, did not bring in 
any prisoners when returning from such expeditions. A portion of the time the regiment was 
on this duty one hundred and Sixty of the men were mounted. 

In February, 1864, one hundred and five officers and men re-enlisted as veterans. Captains 
Craighan and Miner, with Lieutenants Whitehead, Pollock, and Buxton, making up the list of 
officers remaining with the detachment. Beside the veterans there were eighty-nine recruits. 
On the 26th of October, 1864, the regiment received orders to report at Camp Dennison, Ohio, to 
complete their record, and be mustered out of the service. The same locomotive which drew the 
regiment from its first camp of rendezvous at St. Louis, also drew it from Little Rock to DuvalPa 
Bluff, and when the regiment reached the mouth of White River they embarked on the steamer 
Continental, the same boat that carried them into service. 

The regiment arrived in Cincinnati November 7th, 1864, and proceeded at once to Camp 
Dennison, where, on the 18th of November, it was mustered out of service, completing its term 
of three years and a few days over. 



158 



OHIO IN THE WAE. 



23d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



HANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 
Do 


W. 8. ROSECRANS 
E. PARKER SCAMMON.j 
I B HAYES 


June 7, 1861 
14, " 
Oct. 15, 1862 
" 19, 1864 
June 7, 1861 
Oct.. 23, " 
15, " 
March 8, 18f5 
June 7, 4861 
Oct. 28, " 
15, " 
March s, 1865 
Inly 2, 1861 

4 1862 
\pril 22, 1864 
March 22, 1865 
lulv 20, isfil 
April 30, 1862 
June 16, 1865 
1, 1861 
1, " 
1, " 


June 7, 1861 
14, " 
)ct. 24, 1862 
19, 184 
June 7, 1861 
Oct. 24, " 
24, 1862 
March 8, 1865 
1 nne 7, 1861 
Oct. 28, " 
Nov. 3, 1862 
March 8, 1865 
Inly 2, 1861 
2, " 
" 23, 1862 
April 22, 1864 
March 22, 1865 
July 29, 1861 
Tune 24, 1862 
" 16, I8C-5 
July 12, 1861 
12, " 
12, " 


Appointed Brigadier-General. 
Appointed Brigadier-General October 15, 186?, 
Appointed Brigadier-General October 29, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment, 
i lomoted to Colonel of Fifty-First regiment, 
^ronioted to Colonel October 15, 1862. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out October 26, 1862. 
Promoted to new regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
K. -signed April 30, 1862. 
Discharged August 31, 1863. 

Promoted to Major. 
Appointed Major U. S. A, [July 29, 1&3. 
Appointed Major 88th O. V. I. by War Dept., 
llesigned February 14, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned July 17. 1861. 
Resigned September 24, 1862. 
Resigned March 23, 1862. 
Resigned February 11, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Died November 6, 1861. 
Resigned November 30, 1862. 
Killed May 9, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Honorably discharged April 19, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Revoked. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Honorably discharged December 31, 1864. 
Honorably discharged November 30, 1864. 
Killed in action Sptember3, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Killed in action Septembers, 1864. 
On detached duty at muster out of regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Discharged March 13, I,s65. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out. 
.Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned July 19, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Appointed Major Fifty-Fourth 0. V. I. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned July 17, 1.-61. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned December 26, 1862. 
Appointed Captain and A. Q. M. 
Resigned September 19, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Appointed Captain Fifty-Fourth regiment. 
Honorably Discharged December 12, 1862. 
Resigned. [staff, Oct. 27, 1862. 
Prom, to Capt. A.A.G. Brig. Gen. Scauimoif H 
Resigned April 18, 1862. [Oct. 7, l.vil!. 
Prom, to Capt. A. A. G. on Gen. Cook n etat". 


Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Do 
Do 
Captain 
Do 
Do 


IAMESM. COMLY 
STANLEY MATHKWS 
1 B HAYES 1 


JAMES M. COMLY 
IUSSKLL HASTINGS 
R. B. HAYES 
JAMKS M. (. OMLY 
JAMES P. MC!LRATII 
JARKY THOMPSON 


OIIN McCUKDY 

JOSEPH E. BAERKT 


KLMORK Y. KING 


UOSWELL G. FRENCH..... 
VNSON P. JONES 
J. P. Mellrath 

G R Giddin ir v 


John W. SkiU-s 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


W. H. Zimmerman 
:srael Can by 
W. Slocum 
j L ih-ike 


1, " 
" 1, " 

1, " 

!! ]> !! 

July 23l " 
23, " 

Dec. 10, " 
Feb. 11, 1862 
March 23, " 
Sept.. 24, " 


12! " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
23, " 
23, 
Dec. 10, 
March 20, 1862 
April 14, 
NOT. 3, 


Do 


R B Moore 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


D. C. Howard 
Carlos A. Spvrry 
W. J. Woodward 


Do 




Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

Do 


Selleck B. Warren 
Henry G. Hood 




Oct. 15, " 
Nov 30, " 
Feb. 14, 1863 
Au <r 8 " 


Dec. 3l , " 
March 30, 1863 
Ail" 8 " 




K: ::::::::: 

Do 


Russell llastinss 


DcHaven K. Smith 


June 14, 1864 


June 14, 1864 


Do 
Do 


John U. Hi it/. 


July 1, " 
1, " 
1, " 
1, " 
1, " 
1, 
4 1, 
25, 
Sept. 17, 
17, 
Jan. 11,186; 
11, 
April 20, 
20, 
20, 
May 11, 
June 1, 1861 
1, | 

ll 
1, 
1, 
1. 
1, 

July 17*, 
23l 


July 1, " 
1, " 
1, " 
1, " 
" 1, " 
1, " 
1, " 
" 25 " 
Sept. 17, " 
17, " 
Jan. 11, 186; 
11, " 
April 20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
March 11, 
July 12, 18i 1 
12, 
|| 12, | 

|| 12 , | 

12l 
12, 

17, * 


Do 
Do 


Jonathan H. McMullen.... 
John S Ellen 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Andrew Y. Austin 
Edward A. Abbott 
Amos F. Gillis 
Win. McKinleyJr 
Charles W. Atkinson 
Win. E. Sweet 
Francis M. Keiley 
Leanedr H. Lane 
Maurice Watkins 
Win C I./ von 


Do 




Do 

Int Lieutenant 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Charles H. Morgan 
W. J. Woodward 


C A Sperry 


J Ross McMnliin 


Abraham A. Hunter 
W. S. Rice 
Cyrus N. Fisher 


Henry G. Hood 
J. P. Cunningham 
S. B. Warren.. 
Fred II Bacon 


Charles E. Reichenback.... 
John F. Walls 


Henry Richardson 
James Na ugh ton 
John E. Jewett 
James L. Bottslbrd 
W. W. Sheppard 
R. P. Kennedy 


23, 
23, 
23, 
Jan. 17, 1862 
Feb. S, " 
9, " 


:: | : 

23l 
Jan. 17, 1862 
Feb. 8, " 
March 14, " 


Russell Hastings 
Dellaven K Smith 


March 231 " 
April 18, " 
Sept. 24, " 
Oct. 15, 
Nov. 1, " 
Dec. 26, " 
26. " 


April H! " 
June 24, " 
Nov. 3, " 
" 8, " 
1, " 
Dec. 31, " 
31. " 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain and A. A. 0. 
Resigned December 26, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned February 7, 1863. 


Harry Thompson 
Archie C Fisk 


Adam W. Dnrkct- 
Andrew Y. Austin 
Benj. F. Cooper 



"TWENTY-THIRD OlIIO INFANTRY. 



159 



RANK. 


1 

NAME. 


DATK OF RANK 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


lt Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

K: 

2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

si; 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

K: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


George W. Hicks 
John S. Ellen 
Benj. W. Jaekson 
Wm. McKinlev, jr 
Milton B. Deshong 
Wm. P. Chambcrlin 
Edward A. Abbott 
Thomas A. Stephens 


Nov. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Feb. 

Aug. 


20, 1862 
7, " 
1, 1863 
7, " 
14, " 
8, " 
8, " 
8, " 


Dec. 

Jan. 
March 

Aug. 


31, 1862 
24, " 

30, 1863 
30, 
30, " 
8, " 
8, " 
8, " 


Promoted to Colonel 186th N. Y. Volunteers. 
Promoted to Captain 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain, 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 


Amos F Gillis 


J u no 
July 


14, 1864 
11, " 
1, " 


Jun 
July 


14, 1864 
14, " 

1, " 


Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 





John W. Cracrat t 
Maurice Watkin* 


Andrew Ma ban 







" 


1, " 


Mustered out with regiment. 


B ?nj. Killiam 


Sept. 
Jan. 
April 

May 
J nno 


], " 

1, || 

i! " 
i, " 
i, " 
i, || 

n! " 

17, " 

ll, 186: 

11, " 

20, " 
20, 
20 " 
11, " 
1, 1861 
1, " 
1, || 


Sept. 
Jan. 
April 

Mav 
July 


, " 
1, " 
1, " 

1, " 
25, " 
17, " 
17, " 
11, 1865 
11, " 
20. " 
20, 
"M, " 
11, " 
12, 1S61 

12| " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 


Mustered out with regiment, 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Appointed regimental Q. M. May 27, 1866 
Resigned Jnly 5, 1865. 
.Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Charl-s W. Atkinson 
Wm. C. Lyon 
Francis M. Kelley 
( has. 11. Morgan 


Engeri" Clarke 


Wm E Sweet 


Cyrus M. Hubbard 
Lyman II. McBride 
Bri. Hill 


Lewis E. Vance 
Albert B. Logan. 
b rederick Thompson 
Charles P. Conant. 


lohn N. Bay less 
James T. Ogden 
John F Walls 


W. W. Sheppard 




Henry Richardson 
James L. Bottsford 
R. P. Kennedv 


Dellaven K. Smith 


" 




" 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Declined promotion. 


\. C. Fisk 


July 


23) " 


" 12, " 


Lafayette Iloge 


Adam W Durkee.... 


Sept. 
Ian. 


7, " 
17, 1862 


Sept. 
Jan. 


23, |; 
17, 1862 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Assistant Quartermaster United State* Army. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned December 20, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
lies! fined February 14, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed May 9, 1S64. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out. 
Declined. 
Commission returned. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
ilonorably discharged January 13, 1S65. 
ivesigned September 23, 1864. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 




Uohert S idles Gardner 
lohn S Fllen 


Benj. F. Cooper 


\ndrew Y. Austin 
^ orge C. Warren 
B-nj. W. Jackson 
Martin V. Hitter 
Wm. McKinlev, jr 
Milton B. Deshong 
Kd ward A Abbott 


March 
\pril 

Sept. 

>ct. 

D C. 

N ov. 
Dec. 

Ian. 
Feb. 


9, 
11, | 

is , " 

24, 

26, 
26, 
26, 
30, 
26, " 
26, " 
11, 186. ! 

7* " 
14, " 
8, " 
8, " 
8, " 
8, " 
14, 1861 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
1, " 
1, " 


March 

April 
I une 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Ian. 
March 

June 
Inly 


14, " 
1:0 " 
11, " 

1: :: 

31, " 
31, " 
31, " 
21, " 
31, " 
24, 18-.3 
.10, 
30, 
30, 
30, | 

8* 

8, " 
14, 1864 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
1, " 

l! " 
1, " 
1, " 


ieorge Seaman 


W. P. Chamberlin 


1 hos. A. Stephens 
\monF. Gillis 
Wm. C. Lvon 


Jhasi. A. Townslee. 
lohn W. Cracraft 
Henry M Deer 




Jh-ville W Richards 


Ian. 
July 


, harles W. Atkinson 
has 11 Moi"an 


vVm E Sweet 


L -ander 11 Lane 


Eugene Clarke 
brands M Kelley 
Jen.i. Killiam 
>wis E. Vance 
Lyman If. McBride 


Ihas. II. Moore 
5ri. Hill 


" 


1, " 
1, " 


M 


.Jyrus M. llubbavd 


" 


1, " 


" 


1, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


# t- 




1," " 


1, " 


"Mortally wounded. 


Do. 

!: 
fc 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

8S: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Ubert B. Lt.iran 


Sept. 17! " 


Jan. 


11, 1865 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


M-ederiek Thompson 
Charles Edward Brigden... 
"harles P. Conant 
lohn N. Bavless 


Vpril 
In no 


17, " 
17, " 
20, " 

24), " 

20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
22, " 
22, | 

22! | 

22] 


\pril 
uno 


11, " 
11, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
22, " 
22, " 
22, " 
22, " 
22, " 
22, " 
22, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
tcsitnied March 10, 1865. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out witli regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned Jnly 11, 1865. 


lames T. O"den 


lames M. Craig 


"jeonidas II. Inscho 
Pereival Haves 


Win. II. McConnell 
Georzc W. II,.letoii 
Charles A. Willard 
)ewitt C. Speirv 
lohn B. Gnstin 
lohn Martin 
Wm. A. Stoner 



160 OHIO IN THE WAS. 



TWENTY-THIRD OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THIS was one of the first regiments organized at the commencement of the war for the 
Union, and had for its commander one who, shortly after his entrance into the service, 
became one of the most distinguished leaders of the National forces. The Twenty-Third 
was organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, in the month of June, 1861, under Colonel William 
S. Rosecrans, and was mustered into the United States service for three years on the llth day 
i/f -June, 1861. Before leaving for the field Colonel Rosecrans received a commission as Briga 
dier-General in the regular army of the United States, and Colonel E. P. Scammon succeeded to 
the command of the Twenty-Third. On the 25th of July, 1861, the regiment was ordered to 
Clarksburg, West Virginia, where it arrived on the 27th. 

It was at once launched into the arena of war, receiving orders on the 28th to proceed to 
Weston. From this point it operated against the numerous guerrillas infesting the country in 
that quarter, performing many days and nights of excessively hard duty, marching and counter 
marching over the rugged spurs of Rich Mountain range, and drenched by the almost continual 
rains of that season. 

For the purpose of operating with greater facility against the scattered bands of the enemy, 
the regiment had been divided five companies being placed under command of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Stanley Mathews as a movable force, to be used exclusively against the guerrillas, and 
constituting the right wing. The left wing remained at Weston, sending out occasional foraging 
and scouting expeditions against guerrillas and other disaffected inhabitants of that wild region. 

On the 1st of September the two wings of the regiment united at Bulltown, whence, with the 
main body of General Kosecrans s army, the Twenty-Third marched on Carnifex Ferry, where 
the Rebels, under General Floyd, were posted in a strong position. The evening of the 10th 
found the Twenty-Third in line of battle, engaged in sharp skirmishing with the enemy. In the 
night Floyd abandoned his position and retreated across the Gauley River. Heavy rains ren 
dered the pursuit of the Rebels almost impossible, but it was attempted, and with much success in 
capturing prisoners. The chase was continued to the enemy s intrench ments at the foot of Big 
Sewell Mountain. Remaining here but a few days, the Twenty-Third fell back to Camp Ewing, 
on New River. This camp proved a very unhealthy one, and the ranks of the regiment were 
rapidly thinned diarrheas, fevers, etc., proving fatal in many cases. 

The winter of 1861 was devoted to recruiting, drill, and discipline. Two companies (F and 
G) joined a detachment under Major Cornly, which, on December 31, 1861, occupied Raleigh 
C. II. without opposition. Over three hundred stand of arms, twenty-seven prisoners, and a 
quantity of supplies were captured. Companies A and B were added to this detachment ; and, on 
the 10th of February, Major Comly marched his command from Raleigh C. H. to the mouth of 
Blue Stone River, a distance of twenty-eight miles, through a snow-storm, driving a regiment of 
the enemy s infantry and a small force of cavalry, with considerable loss, across the river. The 
camps, tents, and forage of this force were captured. The detachment received the thanks of 
General Rosecrans, commanding department, in general orders, for its bravery and efficiency. 

On the 17th of April, 1862, orders were received to quit winter-quarters and go into camp. 



TWENTY-THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. 161 

The command, on the 22d, moved in the direction of Princeton, the Twenty-Third, under com 
mand of Lieutenant-Colonel Hayes, being in the advance all the way through. Princeton was 
reached on the 1st of May, the enemy leaving the town on the approach of our forces, after hav 
ing doomed it to the flames. From this date until the 8th of May nothing but foraging and 
skirmishing occurred. 

On the morning of the 8th the regiment was attacked by four regiments of the enemy s infantry 
and six pieces of artillery, under command of the Rebel General Heth. Only nine companies of 
the Twenty-Third were present and three small companies of cavalry. All of the cavalry except 
Gillmore s dragoons disappeared after the first fire. The regiment, however, made a determined 
stand, and, when overwhelmed and forced to retire, did so in good order, fighting as it went. It 
fell back to East River, being pursued by the enemy to the narrows of New River. Meeting 
re-enforcements at Adair s farm, after destroying tents, camp, and garrison equipage, on the 18th 
of May, the command left Princeton and returned to Flat Top Mountain, after having endured 
excessive hardships and almost starvation, the enemy having cut off all supplies. 

The regiment remained at Flat Top Mountain until the 13th of July, when it was ordered to 
Green Meadows, seven miles from Pack s Ferry, on New River. Orders were received on the 
15th of August to march, with all possible dispatch, to Camp Piatt, on the Great Kanawha, 
where the regiment arrived on the morning of the 18th, and embarked on board transports, 
having marched one hundred and four miles in a little more than three days. Its officers claim 
this to be the fastest march on record, as made by any considerable force. Here the Twenty- 
Third went on board transports to Parkersburg, where it took the cars for Washington City, 
arriving on the 24th of August. From Washington the regiment marched with General McClel- 
lan s army toward Frederick City, from which place the Rebels were driven, with slight loss on 
both sides. Middletown was reached on the 13th. Here was commenced the battle of South 
Mountain, culminating in the great battle of Antietam, on the 17th of September, in both of 
which the Twenty-Third participated. 

At South Mountain the regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hayes (General J. D. Cox com 
manding division), was the first infantry engaged, being the advance of the column on that day. 
It was ordered at an early hour to advance by an unfrequented road leading up the mountain, and 
to attack the enemy. Posted behind stone walls, the enemy, in greatly superior force, poured a 
destructive fire of musketry, grape, and canister into our ranks at very short range and in a very 
short space of time. Lieutenant-Colonel Hayes, Captain Skiles, and Lieutenants Hood, Ritter, 
and Smith were each badly wounded (Colonel Hayes s arm broken ; Captain Skiles shot through 
the elbow, arm amputated ; Ritter, leg amputated) ; and over one hundred dead and wounded lay 
upon the field, out of the three hundred and fifty who went into the action. The command now 
devolved upon Major Comly, and remained with him from that time forward. The enemy sud 
denly opened fire from the left, and the regiment changed front on first company. Lieutenant- 
Colonel Hayes soon after again made his appearance on the field, with his wound half dressed, 
and fought, against the remonstrances of the whole command, until carried off. Soon after, the 
remainder of the brigade came up, a gallant charge was made up the hill, and the enemy was 
dislodged and driven into the woods beyond. In this charge a large number of the enemy were 
killed with the bayonet. During the remainder of the day the regiment fought with its division. 
Three bayonet charges were made by the regiment during the day, in each of which the enemy 
were driven with heavy loss. 

During the day the Twenty-Third lost nearly two hundred, of whom almost one-fourth were 
killed on the field or afterward died of their wounds. Only seven men were unaccounted for at 
the roll-call after the action. The colors of the regiment were riddled, and the blue field almost 
completely carried away by shells and bullets. 

At Antietam the regiment fought with the Kanawha Division. Near the close of the day a 
disastrous charge was made by the division (the Twenty-Third occupying the right of the First 
Brigade), by which the left of the division was exposed to a large force of the enemy, who sud 
denly emerged from a corn-field in rear of the left. The colors of the regiment were instantly 
VOL. 1111. 



162 OHIO IN THE AVAR*. 

shot down. At the same time a feint was made in the front. A battery in the rear opened fire 
on the advancing column of the enemy, by which also the National forces sustained more loss 
than the enemy. After a moment s delay the colors were planted by Major Comly on a new line 
at right angles with the former front, and, without waiting for any further order, the regiment, at 
a run, formed a line in the new direction, and opened fire on the enemy, who, for some cause, 
retired. Little damage was done by the enemy except a few captures from the left. The divis 
ion soon after withdrew ; but, through some inadvertency, no order reached the Twenty-Third, 
and it remained on the field until Colonel Scammon (commanding the division) came back and 
ordered it to the rear. 

Almost exhausted by several days hard fighting, the regiment was ordered to support a bat 
tery of General Sturgis s division during the night, and was not relieved until the afternoon of 
the next day. 

On the 8th of October the Twenty-Third received orders to return, with the Kanawha Divis 
ion, to West Virginia, It marched via Hagerstown, and arrived there on the 10th. Before 
embarking, however, on the cars for Clarksburg, information was received of Stuart s raid into 
Pennsylvania, and, of course, a " double-quick " into that quarter was the result. The report was 
premature. No enemy was discovered. The regiment returned to Hancock on the 13th of Octo 
ber, having eaten breakfast in Pennsylvania, dinner in Maryland, and supper in Virginia. It 
arrived at Clarksburg on the 15th of October. Here a change was made in the command of the 
regiment. Colonel Scammon was appointed Brigadier-General, and Lieutenant-Colonel Hayes 
appointed Colonel ; Major Comly promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, and Captain Mcllrath to 
Major. The division was ordered to the Kanawha Valley, where it arrived on the 10th of 
November, having marched the entire distance over nearly the same route as in 1861. On the 
18th of November the Twenty-Third went into winter-quarters at the Falls of the Great Kanawha. 
During the campaign of 1862 it marched about six hundred miles; but now, with the exception 
of occasional scouting, its duties were light. 

On the 15th of March, 1863, the regiment was ordered to Charleston, Virginia, where it lay 
in camp during March, April, May, June, and part of July, performing little or no duty, with 
the exception of a few scouts, and an advance as far as Raleigh, Virginia, and its participation in 
the movements against the Morgan raid in July. In the last-named affair the Twenty-Third 
performed good service in heading off Morgan s band on the line of the Ohio River, at Buffing- 
ton Bar, and near Hockingport, picking up a number of the guerrillas as they attempted to cross 
the Ohio River. 

The regiment then returned to Charleston, Virginia, and lay there in camp during the 
remainder of 1863, and up to April 29, 1864, when a movement was made to a point two 
miles above Brownstown, on the Kanawha, preparatory to joining the forces gathering under 
General Crook for a raid on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. This expedition was some 
thing worthy of their mettle. Their long inaction had not hardened their sinews or made them 
impervious to fatigue; but, as was their custom, the rank and file of the Twenty-Third entered 
into the expedition with cheerfulness, and a determination, if possible, to make it signally suc 
cessful. Without detailing their daily marches, it is sufficient to say that the regiment toiled on 
over the rugged mountains, up ravines, and through the dense woods, meeting with snows and 
rains in sufficient volumes to appal the stoutest hearts; but they toiled patiently, occasionally 
brushing the enemy out of their way, until, on the 9th of May, 1864, the battle of Cloyd Mount 
ain was fought. 

In tliis engagement the Twenty-Third was on the right of the First Brigade. About noon 
they were ordei-ed to charge the enemy, who occupied the first crest of the mountain, with artil 
lery and infantry, behind rudely-constructed breastworks. The hill itself was thickly wooded, 
steep and difficult of ascent, and was skirted by a stream of water from two to three feet deep. 
The approach was through a beautiful meadow five or six hundred yards in width. At the word 
of command the regiment advanced at double-quick across the meadow, under a very heavy fire 
of musketry and artillery, to the foot of the mountain, across the stream. The regiment advanced 



TWENTY-THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. 163 

steadily to thjis point, without returning the fire of the enemy; and, after a short pause, a furious 
assault was made upon the enemy s works, carrying them, and capturing two pieces of artillery, 
which were brought off the field by Lieutenant Austin. The enemy fell back to the second crest 
or ridge of the mountain, where a determined attempt was made to form a line, but, after a short 
struggle, lie was driven from there in full retreat. Re-enforcements arriving on the field, a third 
attempt was made to make a stand, but unsuccessfully. The struggle at the guns was of the 
fiercest description. The Rebel artillerymen attempted to reload their pieces when our line was 
not more than ten paces distant. Private Kosht, company G, a recruit, eighteen years of age, 
was the first to reach the guns. With a boyish shout he sprang from the ranks, and hung his 
hat over the muzzle of one of the guns. 

In this charge Captain Hunter, company K, and Lieutenant Seaman, commanding company 
D, were both killed. Captain Rice, company A, was slightly wounded, but rejoined his com 
pany before the action was over. Lieutenant Abbott, company I, a valuable officer, was severely 
wounded, and left in hospital at Dublin Depot. 

On the 10th of May there was another affair at New River Bridge, in which artillery was 
mostly used. The enemy were driven, and the bridge destroyed. The forces marched to Pep 
per s Ferry, and crossed without opposition a tediously-slow process, however, as the whole 
army was crossed in one small ferry-boat, of verv limited capacity, with the rain pouring down 
and dashing in the men s faces all night. The trains crossed at Rocky Ford a short distance 
above, at the expense of some men and a number of horses drowned. 

On May llth the march was continued to Blacksbnrg, skirmishing by the way, with two 
Rebels killed, two of our men wounded, and four of company F captured. On May 12th Salt 
Pond Mountain was crossed, the Twenty-Third acting as train-guard. The constant rains for 
several days had put the road in wretched condition. Most of the way it was wide enough for 
only one team to pass at a time. The animals were much fagged by heavy work and insufficient 
forage, and many of them dropped dead in the harness, so that loads had to be shifted and a 
number of wagons abandoned and burned. To add to the confusion a large number of "contra 
bands," who had joined the column with all sorts of conveyances, and a great many with no 
conveyance at all, began to lose horses and wagons, which clogged the road, and many of the 
poor wretches had to walk through the mud and rain, carrying children and supplies, and what 
ever household goods they were unwilling to leave. 

On the morning of the 13th camp was reached at twenty minutes past five, greatly exhausted 
by the fatigues of the crossing. After nn hour s rest the march was resumed, and prosecuted day 
by day, the troops almost constantly ha missed by the enemy, encountering great obstacles in 
swollen streams, rocky, muddy roads, and semi-starvation. 

, At Staunton, June 8th, the Twenty-Third joined General Hunter s command. The first 
terms of service of the regiment expiring on the llth, those not re-enlisting as veterans were 
sent home, also the old colors, which were no longer in condition for service. The depot, rail 
road, bridges, and some of the public buildings and machine-shops of Staunton were destroyed 
by fire, and a beautiful stone arch spanning one of the streets where the railway passed, was 
blown up. Private property was respected. 

On June 10th the regiment marched to Brownsburg, twenty-three miles from Staunton, 
skirmishing nearly all the way. The enemy was driven with ease. Lexington was reached 
about noon of the llth, the Rebels burning a bridge at the approach of the National forces, and 
a pretty sharp artillery duel being kept up, while White s brigade effected a crossing about two 
miles, above the town, compelling the enemy to retire. General Hunter s column came up in 
great haste just as the town was captured. Bv General Hunter s orders, the Military Academy, 
Washington College, and Governor Letcher s residence were burned. Good discipline only 
secured the execution of this order, which was protested against, formally, by Generals Crook 
and Averill, and, tacitly, by nearly every officer and man of the command. 

On the 14th the Twenty-Third marched- twenty-five miles to Buckhannon, thence to within 
two miles of Lynchburg ; and, while moving up the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, met the 



164 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

enemy and drove them pell-mell for two miles, capturing four pieces of their artillery. It was 
supposed our forces would immediately push on into Lynchburg after this success, but, after mov 
ing about until a short time after dark, they were ordered into camp. One brigade camped so 
near the enemy in the dark that the men commenced taking rails from the same fence. Some 
men of Gordon s (Rebel) brigade having exposed themselves, a lively little skirmish sprang up 
about midnight, but was quelled by withdrawing a short distance from each other. 

On the 18th, at two A. M., Crook s command set off on a flanking expedition to the right to 
cross James River and attack Lynchburg in the rear. The cavalry, at the same time, were sent 
to the left to make a diversion. The Twenty-Third had not commenced crossing, however, when 
a messenger came from General Hunter with information that the enemy had received heavy 
re-enforcements, and was preparing to attack the lines in the center. It, with other forces, 
marched back rapidly,, and soon after received information that the enemy was about to attack 
in overwhelming force, and that the artillery was in danger. It then moved double-quick to the 
exposed point, in the advance, led by General Crook in person. The roar of artillery and the 
crash of shell prevented any orders from being heard, but the command always followed such 
lead. The attack was soon repulsed, with trifling loss. The troops lay in line of battle at this 
point until some time after dark, when, finding the enemy heavily re-enforced from Richmond, 
a skirmish-line was left on the front, while the rest quietly withdrew and commenced the retreat 
from Lynchburg, marching rapidly toward the town of Liberty. The fighting was all done in a 
dense thicket wlfere the light of the sun could not be seen. The men had had no sleep for two 
days and nights, and scarcely anything to eat. In this condition they marched, falling down 
frequently asleep in the road, it being with the utmost difficulty that they could be kept on 
their feet. About ten A. M. the regiment rested an hour and twenty minutes, and then pushed 
on without any more halts. Of the subsequent march, the following extracts from the diary of 
an officer of the regiment form a fitting record : 

"June 19. Marched all day, dragging along very slowly. The men had nothing to eat, the 
trains having been sent in advance. It is almost incredible that men should have been able to 
endure so much, but they never faltered, and not a murmur escaped them. Often men would 
drop out silently, exhausted, but not a word of complaint was spoken. Shortly after dark, at 
Liberty, had a brisk little fight with the enemy s advance; reached Bu ford s Gap about ten A. M. 
of the 20th. General Crook remained here with Hayes s brigade, holding the gap until dark, 
inviting an attack. The army was, however, too cautious to do more than skirmish. After dark 
we withdrew, and marched all night to overtake the command in the advance. Reached Salern 
about nine A. M. Hunter had passed through Salem, and a body of the enemy s cavalry fell 
upon his train and captured the greater part of his artillery. About the same time Crook was 
attacked in front and rear, and, after a sharp fight, pushed through, losing nothing. Heavy skir 
mishing all day, and nothing to eat, and no sleep. Continued the march until about ten P. M., 
when we reached the foot of North Mountain, and slept. 

" At four A. M. next morning (22d) left in the advance, the first time since the retreat com 
menced. By a mistake a march of eight miles was made for nothing. Thus we toiled on, suf 
fering intensely with exhaustion, want of food, clothing, etc. On the 27th a supply-train was 
met on Big Sewell Mountain. Men all crazy. Stopped and ate; marched and ate ; camped about 
dark, and ate all night. Marched one hundred and eighty miles in the last nine days, fighting 
nearly all the time, and with very little to eat." 

The column reached Charleston July 1st, and remained there refitting and resting until July 
10th, when the Twenty-Third embarked for Parkersburg, en route for Martinsburg, General 
Crook s command having been ordered East to meet Early, who had invaded Maryland and Penn 
sylvania, It reached Martinsburg on the 14th, lay in camp there until the 18th, and then 
marched to Cabletown, ten miles beyond Harper s Ferry, driving in the enemy s pickets. Still 
under the immediate command of General Hunter, General Crook being at Snicker s Gap, 
Hayes s brigade (including the Twenty-Third) was sent, without cavalry and with two sections 
of a howitzer battery of the oldest and clumsiest pattern, to attack Early s army of twenty 



TWENTY-THIKD OHIO INFANTRY. 165 

thousand or more, in flank, with no other force on this side of the Shenandoah and no possibility 
of communicating. The enemy had already whipped the First Division, with the whole Sixth 
Corps to back them, and they lay on the opposite bank of the river at Snicker s Ferry. After 
pretty heavy skirmishing the Twenty-Third, with the Thirty-Sixth Ohio, were entirely sur 
rounded by two divisions of the enemy s cavalry, but fought their way out and returned to camp. 
Marching toward Harper s Ferry, on the 22d of July, they joined General Crook at Winchester. 
. On the 24th a battle was fought at Winchester, in which the National forces were defeated 
after a well-contested fight from early in the morning until nine o clock at night. The Twenty- 
Third Ohio lost in this engagement one hundred and fifty-three men, ten of whom were commis 
sioned officers. General Mulligan and his brother-in-law were killed, and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Comly and many others wounded. 

The forces moved toward Martinsburg early next morning, the enemy following closely. At 
Martinsburg the enemy s cavalry charged into the town, when General Crook made a sudden 
advance with his whole force, drove them badly and captured a number of prisoners. He then 
withdrew, and under cover of the feint of numerous camp-fires, moved off quietly toward the 
ford at Williamsport, and camped on the south bank of the Potomac. 

On the 2Gth of July a series of marches and countermarches were inaugurated which was 
kept up until the evening of the 14th of August, when Duvall s brigade had quite a battle with a 
considerable force of Rebel infantry and artillery. The enemy s artillery gave them such an 
advantage that they drove our forces back five or six hundred yards, but a charge was made and 
in turn they were driven back, with the loss of some prisoners and a fine lot of beef cattle. Then 
followed another dance up and down the Valley, fighting and retreating. At Front Royal Sheri 
dan s cavalry made a saber charge and captured two hundred and sixty of the enerny. 

At Halltown, on the 23d of August, the enemy attacked at daylight but did not follow it up. 
At six P. M. Hayes s brigade, the Twenty-Third and Thirty-Sixth Ohio, with part of the Fifth 
West Virginia, sallied out and drove in the enemy s skirmish-line, capturing a lot of prisoners 
from Kershaw s Rebel division. This charge was brilliantly executed, and excited astonishment 

among the Rebel prisoners. The universal inquiry was: "Who the h 1 are uns?" On the 

23d another sortie was made, and six officers and one hundred prisoners taken, all from Ker 
shaw s (South Carolina) division. 

Nothing of importance transpired until the 3d of September at Berryville, where the 
Twenty-Third was sent out on picket. A general engagement was brought on just before dark, in 
which was desperate fighting the most of it after dark. As the Twenty-Third formed line and 
went into battle, the boys were received with loud cheers. Colonel Hayes, commanding brigade, 
went out of the line to meet and lead his old regiment. The cannonade was very rapid and con 
tinuous, and the exploding shells and the blaze of the discharge from guns and small arms made 
a diabolic display. At ten o clock both parties withdrew, apparently satisfied, and the Twenty- 
Third returned to picket-duty. It lost in this affair Captains Austin and Gillis, both brave and 
accomplished officers. 

After the usual amount of marching and countermarching, from the 4th to the 18th of Sep 
tember, the battle of Opequan was fought on the 19th. General Crook s command was in 
reserve, but was very soon brought into action and sent to the extreme right of the line to make 
a flank attack. Hayes s brigade had the extreme right of the infantry. The position was reached 
under cover of an almost impenetrable growth of cedar, crossing a swampy stream. Here the 
division was halted a-nd formed First Brigade (Hayes s) in front, and the Second (Johnson s) 
in rear. Throwing out a light line of skirmishers the brigade advanced rapidly to the front, 
driving the enemy s cavalry. The National cavalry at the same time advanced out of the woods 
on the right. After advancing in this way across two or three open fields, under a scattering fire, 
the crest of a slight elevation was reached, when the enemy s infantry line came into view, off 
diagonally to the left front, and he opened a brisk artillery fire. 

Moving forward double-quick under this fire, the brigade reached a thick fringe of under 
brush, dashing through which it came upon a deep slough, forty or fifty yards wide and nearly 



166 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

waist deep, with s >ft mud at the bottom, overgrown with a thick bed of moss, nearly strong 
enough to bear the weight of a man. It seemed impossible to get through it, and the whole 
line was staggered for a moment. Just then Colonel Hayes plunged in with his horse, and 
under a shower of bullets and shells, with his horse sometimes down, he rode, waded, and 
dragged his way through the first man over. The Twenty-Third was immediately ordered by 
the right flank and over the slough at the same place. In floundering through this morass men 
were suffocated and drowned, still the regiment plunged through, and, after a pause long enough 
to partially re-form the line, charged forward again, yelling and driving the enemy. Sheridan s 
old cavalry kept close up on the right, having passed around the slough, and every time the 
enemy was driven from cover charged and captured a large number of prisoners. This plan was 
followed throughout the battle, by which the cavalry was rendered very effective. In one of 
these charges Colonel Duvall, the division commander, was wounded and carried from the field, 
leaving Colonel Hayes in command. He was everywhere exposing himself recklessly as usual. 
He was the first over the slough; he was in advance of the line half the time afterward; his 
Adjutant-General was severely wounded; men were dropping all around him, but he rode 
through it all as if he had a charmed life. 

No re-enforcements no demonstration as promised. Something must be done to stop the 
murderous concentrated fire that is cutting the force so dreadfully. Selecting some Saxony rifles 
in the Twenty-Third, pieces of seventy-one caliber with a range of twelve hundred yards, Lieu 
tenant McBride was ordered forward with them to kill the enemy s artillery horses, in plain 
sight. Thev moved forward rapidly under cover as much as possible. At the first shot a horse 
drops; almost immediately another is killed; a panic seems to seize the artillery and they com 
mence limbering up. The infantry take the alarm, and a few commence running from the 
intrenchments. The whole line rises, and with a tremendous yell the men rush frantically for 
the breastworks; and thus, without stopping to fire another shot, the enemy ran in utter confu 
sion that terrible cavalry, which had been hovering like a cloud on the flanks, sweeping down 
on the Rebels and capturing them by regiments. Eight battle-flags Avere captured and a large 
number of prisoners. The " graybacks " soon looked as numerous as the " blue coats." The 
enemy s artillery in the Star fort was obliged to stop firing and fall back, and the battle was at 
an end. 

About this time the Sixth Corps emerged from the woods in the rear and started forward in 
magnificent style, lines all well dressed, and everything in striking contrast with the shattered 
condition of the troops just engaged. Thus ended the battle of Opequan (pronounced O-pee-can). 
The result was a complete and decisive victory. Lieutenant McBride with his party, sent to kill 
artillery horses, brought in one hundred and two prisoners, of whom he captured Colonel Edgar 
and forty-two others himself. The regiment captured about two hundred men. The artillery was 
captured by the combined force, and therefore the credit does not belong to either in particular. 

The battle of North Mountain occurred September 20, 1864. It was more of an impetuous 
charge than a regular battle. The Twenty-Third, with its companions of the brigade, charged 
with perfect fury up the whole line of intrenchments, the enemy scarcely making a stand at all, 
flying in utter rout and terror as Crook s command gained their rear, abandoning gun after gun 
to their hands. The loss of the regiment was only one killed and one mortally wounded. 

From this time forward until October 19th no regular battle was fought. The usual amount 
of hnrd marching from point to point in the Valley was gone through with, with occasional 
skirmishes and one or two "artillery duels" to vary the monotony of camp-life. 

On the 19th, however, the battle of Cedar Creek was inaugurated. The Nineteenth and 
Sixth Corps and the cavalry occupied positions on a parallel line with the enemy s front as he 
lay in camp, or nearly so. General Crook s First Division (Thoburn s) occupied works about a 
mile further to the front and on the left of the main line, and the works from their left flank 
rearward were entirely empty, except that the Ninth Virginia, from the Second Division, occu 
pied a small portion of them about half a mile back, where they had been at work the day before. 
Crook s Second Division (Duvall s, commanded by Hayes), or as much of it as was left from 



TWENTY-THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. * 167 

details for cattle-guards, pickets, etc., occupied a camp about one mile and a quarter in rear of 
the First Division, and in rear of the Manchester Pike. An independent brigade (Kitching s) 
occupied a camp to the left and rear of that. The Rebel attacking column crossed the North 
Fork of the Shenandoah from the left of Fisher s Hill, passed down near the base of the Massa- 
nutten Mountain, beyond the picket-line, and recrossed the river at Buxton Ford, well to the rear 
of Crook s command. From there they passed again toward the front, just outside the National 
lines, through the darkness and fog, forming a line of battle extending from Thoburn s right to a 
point about opposite Middletown, beyond the extreme left. (Prisoners reported that this move 
ment was commenced at dark the preceding night.) The night was very dark, and even after 
daylight a thick fog obscured everything and added to the effect of the enemy s attack. The 
nearest force of National cavalry on the left was at Front Royal, eight miles distant. The reader 
will please note this fact particularly. It may be well to state that a feint was made in Custar s 
front on the extreme right, before the attack, and that a small column of the enemy accompa 
nied by General Early in person, crossed Cedar Creek, on the "Winchester Pike, after the 
left was turned. 

General Sheridan was absent in Washington, and, by seniority, the command devolved upon 
Major-General Wright, commanding Sixth Corps. As soon as the lines were settled into position 
General Crook discovered the weak point on the left, a ford across the North Fork of the Shen 
andoah, accessible from the Massanutten Mountain, and which could not be covered by his infan 
try. He applied immediately for a division of cavalry to cover this ford and picket the front of 
the mountain. This request was immediately granted. For some unexplained reason the cav 
alry had not yet been placed there on the nights of the 18th and 19th. It was generally supposed 
that it was there, and the division officer of the day for the Second Division was instructed that 
it was there, as was also the corps officer of the day Colonel Brown, of the Thirteenth West Vir 
ginia. When the division officer of the day for the Second Division (Colonel Furney, of the 
Thirty-Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry), made the grand rounds, it was reported to him it was 
suspected that troops were moving through the woods in that direction ; and while he was on the 
picket-line he discovered cavalry there, and supposing it to be National cavalry patrolling, rode 
out to see what news they had, and wfis quietly "gobbled up." (He afterward escaped at Mount 
Jackson and arrived safely in camp.) 

Nearly the whole flanking force of the enemy crossed at this ford. With the cavalry in 
position this would have been simply impossible ; and sufficient notice of any such event would 
have been given to have placed not only the Army of West Virginia, but the whole of SheridanV 
army, in the works at the left, to oppose the enemy after he had crossed. The enemy s line, 
when the attack opened, extended from the front of Crook s First Division all the way round to 
a point about opposite Middletown, they having gained their position under cover of the fog and 
darkness, as above stated. To meet this force lying quietly there under cover, waiting for the 
feint on the right of the line (which was the signal for the attack), General Crook had about 
four thousand men. If placed in skirmish-line they would not more than cover the front of 
the enemy s attacking force. The Second Division (Hayes) had but fourteen hundred and fortv- 
five men in camp for di^ty. This was the situation when, at about half-past four A. M., the 
enemy advanced in heavy force against the works of the First Division, pushing in rapidly what 
ever of the picket-line they failed to capture. Although the forces were promptly in line, the 
enemy had it all their own way, and overwhelmed and overlapped the lines so as to push them 
back rapidly. 

The situation in a few minutes after the attack was about this: Crook s command, overpow 
ered and driven from their advanced position, were forming on the left of the Nineteenth Corps, 
which corps was just getting into action, the left being hotly engaged, but not so much so as 
Crook s command yet. The right of the line had not been engaged at all, and was not for some 
time after. While the line was in this situation the trains were all slowly moving off. A des 
perate stand was made by the shattered lines of Crook s comnurnd to save the head-quarters 
train of the army, which came last from the right, and it succeeded. Many brave men lost their 



168 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

lives in this Colonel Thoburn, commanding First Division; Captain Bier, General Crook s 
Adjutant-General, and others. Colonel Hayes, commanding the First Division, had his horse 
shot under him, and narrowly escaped with his life. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall, of the Thirteenth 
Virginia, was killed, but the train was saved. 

From this time the whole line fell slowly back, fighting stubbornly, to a new position which 
hud been selected. There they halted, and the enemy seemed content with shelling us 

General Crook lay a couple of rods away from the line, in a place which seemed to be more 
particularly exposed than any other part of the line. Colonel Hayes lay close by, badly bruised 
from his fall, and grumbling because the troops did not charge the enemy s line, instead of wait 
ing to be charged. Suddenly there is a dust in the rear, on the Winchester Pike ; and, almost 
before they are aware, a young man, in full Major-General s uniform, and riding furiously a mag 
nificent black horse, literally " flecked with foam," reins up and springs off by General Crook s 
side. There is a perfect roar as everybody recognized SHERIDAN! He talks with Crook a 
little while, cutting away at the tops of the weeds with his riding-whip. General Crook speaks a 
half-dozen sentences that sound a great deal like the crack -of the whip; and by that time some 
of the staff are up. They are sent flying in different directions. Sheridan and Crook lie down 
and seem to be talking, and all is quiet again, except the vicious shells of the different batteries 
and the roar of artillery along the line. After awhile Colonel Forsyth comes down in front and 
shouts to the General: "The Nineteenth Corps is closed up, sir." Sheridan jumps up, gives 
one more cut with his whip, whirls himself around once, jumps on his horse, and starts up the 
line. Just as he starts he says to the men : " We are going to have a good thing on them noiv, boys!" 
And so he rode off, and a long wave of yells rolling up to the right with him. The men took 
their posts, the line moved forward, and the balance of the day is a household word over a whole 
nation. 

On October 7th the regiment was detailed as train-guard to Martinsburg, and marched to 
Winchester, where a brigade of the enemy s cavalry was reported to be. On the march the men 
voted at the Presidential election. It was impossible to take all the votes, as the train required 
vigilant watching. The votes were collected by the judges of election as the column was in 
inarch, from among the wagons, etc. There were seven anti-war votes, the first ever cast in the 
regiment, principally from among the teamsters. The regiment reached Martinsburg about 
nine P. M., with the weather very cold, raining, and no wood. 

On the 13th of November it returned to Winchester with a supply-train of seven hundred 
wagons. On the 14th it marched to camp at Kernstown, where the Army of the Shenandoah 
was lying, and went into camp in a dense thicket. The next day the regiment re-commenced drill 
and ordinary camp routine, and kept it up until the middle of December, when it was transferred 
from the extreme left to the extreme right of the line. About the 20th of December Hayes s 
brigade was ordered to Stephenson s Depot, where it remained on duty until the 29th, when it 
marched to Martinsburg and went into camp. 

On January 1, 1865, it embarked for Cumberland at ten A. M., and arrived at six P. M. 
Colonel Hayes was promoted to a Brigadier-Generalship, and Lieu&nant-Colonel Comly to 
Colonel, both to date from October 19, 1864. 

The regiment reached Grafton on the 12th of January. The post at Beverly had been cap 
tured, and the regiment was to operate against the enemy and protect the railroad. From the 
13th to the 18th it lay at Grafto*n, without tents and with insufficient bedding. The weather Avas 
very cold. Returning to Cumberland on the 19th, the regiment was there occupied down to 
March 1st with drill and discipline, and the ordinary camp routine. 

Thereafter followed the collapse of the Southern Confederacy and the surrender of their 
armies. The boys became anxious to get home. The rest of April, May, June, and most of July 
were spent in restive, inglorious ease. The wished-for order came at last, and the Twenty-Third 
was mustered out on the 26th of July, 1865, at Cumberland, and took the cars for Camp Taylor, 
near Cleveland, where the men, were paid and discharged. 



TWENTY-FOURTH OHIO INFANTKY. 



109 



24th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



KAXK. 


NAME. 


DATE 


OK HANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 




IACOB \MMF\ 


I-in 




1S6I 






1861 
1861 

1862 
1861 

1862 

1861 

S63 

861 

862 
Sf 1 

1862 


Appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers. 
Killed December 31, 1862. 
Resigned October 23, 1863. 
Mustered out Jun 24, 1&64. 
Declined. 
Appointed Colonel 44th *regiment. 
Resigned November 2S, 1861. 
Promoted to Colonel May 14, 1862. 
Appointed Colonel 105th regiment Aug. 11, 62. 
Killed December 31, 1862. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned November 28, 1861. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel May 14, 1862. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Aug. 11, 18G2. 
Killed December 31, 1862. 
Dismissed October 3, 1863. 
Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Resigned July 26, 1861. 
Mustered out, with regiment. 
Mustered out June 24, 1864. 
Declined. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Resigned June 23, 1863. 
Mustered out June 24, 1864. 
Resigned August 17, 1861. 
Cancelled; commission returned. 
Resigned August 2, 1862. 
Resigned July 4, 1861. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major. 
Died September 2, 1861. 
Resinned Januarv23, 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major May 14, 1862. 
Res d Oct. 9, tll; re-inst. Jan.20, 62; must dout 
Resigned Jan. 22, Y.2. [for promo. Aug. 26/62. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel 18th regt. 
Died November 29, 1861. 

Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned July 18, 1862. 
Resigned. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned August 15, 1862. 

Resigned June 3, 1862. 
Died January 14, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Killed December 31, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out Juno 21, 1864. 
Killed September 20, 1863. 


Do 
Do 


FREDERICK C. JONES... 
D \ VI D I 11 Hit; I \S 


May 


1-1, 
1 




May 


H, 
1 , 

H! 

IS, 
30, 

in , 

20, 
6, 
3d, 
24, 
31, 
2, 

2ti 
19, 

7 , 
23, 

iz, 

12, 

i . 
i , 
.1 , 

i , 
i , 

12! 

23, 
28, 
23, 

2o , 
20, 
28, 


Do 


A. T. M.COCKERILL 


Oct. 


S 

14, 

14, 

11, 
31, 
10, 

22, 
H, 
20, 
It, 
11, 
31, 
3, 

2t>! 

24, 
19, 
21. 
1">, 


1S6I 
1S62 

1861 

861 

8tl2 
Sti l 


Oct. 
.Iune 

Oct. 
Dec. 
Juno 
Dec. 
Jan. 
June 

Oct. 
Dec. 
.Iune 
Dec, 
Jan. 
Oct. 
July- 
June 
July 

Aug. 
July 
Aug. 


Do 




Oet 
Dec. 
May 
Aug. 

1 lee. 

J line 

Oct. 
Dec. 
May 
Aug. 
Dec. 
Oct. 
July 

April 
July 

Ang, 
July 


Do 




Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Major 
Do 


FREDERICK C. .(ONES 
ALIIKUT S. HALF 
UENUY TKKUV 


A. T. M. COCKEKILL 
SAMUEL A. GILBERT 
LUCIAN BUTTLES 
-HELTON STURGESS 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do . . .. 


\ LIJEKT S. 11 ALL . 


UENUY TKUUY 
ENOCH W EL LEU 
THOMAS M. McCi.URE 
S\ M. B. STUIIGESS 
DAVID WELSH 




Do 
Do 


(i. R. WEEKS 
) M COOK 


Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 


ENOCH PEAUCE 

) M COOK 


HENRY G. SMITH 

E. M. IIOROLAND 

WM. G. LEWIS 


D 
Do 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


EDWARD JONES 
WM. 11. KNOWI.DKN 
Lymnn M. Kellogg 
Shelton Sturgess 
David J. lliggins 
Moses J. Patterson 
samuel B. Jackson 
\lbei t S Hall 


Dec. 
April 

June 


23^ 

s , 
3, 

3 
3 

3 
3 


1862 
ISill 

1862 


Dec. 

July 

April 
June 

July 

.Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 

Jan. 


Do 
Do 
)o 


Henry Terry 
George Arnold 
/. B. Hill 
iaaiiili Given 


Do 
Do 


L homas 31. McClure 
Enoch Well"!- 


July 

Oct. 

Nov. 
Dec. 

Jan. 


1 5 

2o! 
20, 

2S, 


)o 
)o 

)<> . .. ..... .. 


A.T. .M. Cockeriil 
\Varri nyton S. Weston 
iivman N. Easton 
Win. B. Stnrgcss 


)o 
)o 

DO ;; 


G.-oige M. Bacon 
Lafayette Foster 


Feb. 
June 


: 


;; 


Feb. 
June 


8, 


;; 


Do 

Do 
Do 


! /./.hi Stevens 

lacob Diehl 
John W. Brooks 
Do Witt C. Wadsworth 


Aug. 
A tig. 
Dec. 


i"), 

26, 
11, 

31, 


; 


D-c. 
Jan. 


U: 

30, 
21, 


1863 


Do 
Do 


Do 
Do 

DO! . ". ";:; 

Do 
Do 
Do 


Isaac N. Drvden 
B. J. Hoi-ton 
David A. Merrill 


Jan. 

April 


i! 

10, 

21, 
21, 


1863 
1864 


Feb. 
Inne 
April 


K 
10, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 


4 


Killed September 20, 1863. 
Resigned as 1st Lieutenant August 14, 1S64. 
Mustered out June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out October 13, 1864. 
Resigned October 13, 1864. 
Mustered out June 22, 1864. 
Mustered out. 


Burch Fouraker 
Win. C. Beck 
David Thomas 


Nt Lieutenant 
Do. 
!)>. 
Do. 
Do. 


Mo<es T. Wooster 
Win B St;ir""ss 


Inly 
lu lie 


23, 
(i, 
3, 
3, 


1861 


Inly 


2. 5, 
li, 
12, 
12, 


1861 


romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 
romoted to Captain, 
lesigned October 28, 1S61. 
iesisned Septomlier 14, 1861. 
romoted to Captain. 
lesi^ned October 14, 1861. 
)ec!iml. 
{esigned June 3, 1S63. 
Jesign-vl December MO, 1861. 
vesiirned January 1>, IS62. 
romoted to Captain June 3, 1862. 
tesigned January 17, 1M12. 
romoted to Captain December 31, IR62. 
lomnted to Captain January 1, 1863. 
romoted to Captain December 31, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain August 15, 1862. 


vunuel H. Wheeler 
Enoch Weller 
A. T. M. Cockeriil 


D,,. 
Do! 
Do. 
D,. 

D ,. 

i>o! 

Do. 
D,. 

Do! 

Do! 

D,,. 
Do. 


Warrington S Weston 
1. Samu-l Clock. 


Inly 


3, 
3, 
3, 

i ! 

23, 


1862 


Oct. 
Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 


12, 
12, 

12! 
12 
1 
23 

30 

y 


;; 


Baptist Benkier 


Uvniiin N. Easton 
lames R. Jnske-p 
Wm. M Vo-jleson 


Ijalavett .: Foster 


Uenrv S. Harding 
Merrit Em-rson 


Nov. 
Dec. 
Ian. 


IS 

20 
20 

30 

u 


Robert G. Clark 
D, ; Witt C. Wadsworth 
B-.-nj. J. Horlo:i 


Henry Y. Graham 



170 



Omo ix THE WAR. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. I 

Jan. 

Feb. 
Mav 
Juno 

" 

Doc. 

Jan. 
June 

April 


SSXJ 

9, 
2jj 
28, 

22 

24] 
30, 
30, 
3tl, 
30, 
- L 
24, 
24, 
LO. 
1". 
LO, 
In. 
21, 

2l! 
21, 


ED. 


REMAHK8. 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Du! 
Do. 
Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


John Archer 
Robert F. Wheeler 
Charles R. Harmon 
David O. Williams 
I aul Spohn 
Jacob Di.-hl 
John \V. Brooks 
lames ( . Williams 
Isal\c N. Drvilen 
Samuel ! Rebcr 


Jan. 

Feb. 
May 
Juno 

Inlv 


9, 

2g 
28, 

6, 
3, 
3, 
18, 
U, 
15, 
26, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
1, 
1. 
1, 
1, 

21 1 
21, 


1862 

1 6 1 


lSi 2 Honorahlv discharged May 10 1S63 
" Di.-d at Xanesville, Ohio. 
" Promoted to Captain July IS, 1862. 


" Resigned April :iu, is.u. 
" Promoted to Captain August 2*5, 1^2. 
! Promoted to Captain August 11, 1362. 

" Promoted to Captain December 31, 1802. 
" [Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
" Itevoked : resigned as 2d Lieut. March 20, 62. 
lsc,. 5 Promoted to Captain. 
" Promoted to Captain. 
" Resisrned March ! .. 1S64. 
" Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned June L L ; , IN ..>, as 2d Liout >nant. 


David \ "Vli-rrill 


Dec. 
May 

April 


Do. 

Do. 
Do 


Bnrch Fouraker 
Aiiirustu-i Draegcr 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2(1 Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
. Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


David Thomas 




Daniel W. McCov 
John Sparrow.... 


Andrew J. Garrison 


f 


3Iustered out at expiration of ser ice. 
."Mustered out at expiration of S-T ice. 
.Mustered out at expiration of ser ice. 


Win. Jeffries 
Thomas J. Delong 
K. Mollyne;iux 
George Collings 


Transf -rred to 18th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 


Lewis J. Kies 


Fune 

July 

Sept. 

>ct. 
Nov. 


L l. 
21, 
23, 
3, 
3, 
3, 
3, 
3, 

1 

fi 
2S1 
2 

2A\ 

1, 
15, 
15, 
15. 
15, 


1861 
|| 


July 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 


-"., 
21, 
23, 

1 , 
1 . 
1 , 
1 , 
I , 
1 , 
i . 
12, 
6, 
23, 
23, 

L - , 

4, 
15, 
15, 
15, 
L5, 


[8rt] 

ii 


Mustered out. 
Transferred to ISth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Transferred to company D. 
1 romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
1 romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
I nunoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
1 romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
1 romoted to 1st Lieut. [enlisted Mav 7, 62. 
1 romoted to 1st Lieut.; resi d Sept. 20, 61; re- 
Resigned October 22, 1861. 
Resigned. 
Resigned October 28, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned January 3, 18.12. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 6, 1SR2. 


George W. Brown 
Win B St urges 


llenrv S. Harding 
D" Witt C. Wadswortii 
Lafavette Foster 
John U. Elbeit 
Merrit Kmerson 
Robert G Clark 


Jacob Dielil 


Wm. C. Heddleton 
Gabriel B. Still 
lvl ir ar U Kellogg. . 


Thomas M. McClure 


H -nrv S H irdin" 


FarleV D. Bissett" 
John Archer 


Robert F. Wheeler 
Charles K. Harmon 
David 0. Williams 
Paul Spolin 
John W. Brooks 


Hi in v Williams 


Dec. 
Jan. 


I-" , 
20, 
9, 
9, 


1861 


Dec. 
Jan. 


IM! 

9 , 


1S J2 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 3, 1862. 
Resigned April 27, lsf,2. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant December 31, 1802. 


James ( Williams 


James K Jones 


IVrnett L. Cooper 


Daniel Reynolds 
Burch Fouraker 


Feb. 


8, 


" 


Feb. 


8, 





Resigned July 13, is;2. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant August !.">, 1S02. 


Alexaiid-r Jolly 


1 11 ne 

N ov. 
June 
July 
Aug. 

July 
Oct. 
Deo. 

May- 
April 


8, 
6, 
ft, 

18\ 
3, 
18, 
11, 
26, 

I. 1 . . 

31 1 
31, 
1, 

1, 
21, 





June 

Xov. 
Dec. 

Jan. 


6, 
6, 
ft, 
19, 

30, 

:; , 
30, 
" , 
24, 
24, 
24, 


1863 


Declined. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant December 31, 62. 
Promoted: resigned March 20, 1863. 
Promoted August 11, 1862. 
Discharged February 19, 1864. 
Promoted. 
Promoted. 
Promoted Mav 1, 1863. 
Promoted May 1, 1863; resigned Jan. 22, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant May, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned April 6, ls<U. 


\\ m. C. Beck 
Augustus Dnieper 
David A. Merrill 
John Marshall 


Wm. Jelirics 
Thomas J. Del out:. 


John Spi-ncer 


K. Mollvneaux 
Dani"! Me* ov 


G"01 ge Collings. . . 


Wm. A. D,-hass 


Andrew J. Garrison 
Charles G. Morehonse . 


1863 
1864 


June 
April 


10, 
10, 
21, 


1864 




Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Transferred to ISth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 


Samuel W. Thomas 



TWENTY-FOUKTH OHIO INFANTRY. 171 



TWENTY-FOURTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE TWENTY- FOUETH OHIO was organized at Camp Chase, near Columbus, 
in the latter part of June, 1861. Two companies came from Huron County, one from 
Zanesville, one from Sandusky and Columbiana Counties, one from Adams County, one 
from Dayton, one from Trumbull County, one from Highland County, one from Cleveland, and 
one from Coshocton County. 

The regiment left Camp Chase for the field July 26, 1S61, and reached Cheat Mountain Sum 
mit, Virginia, August 14th, there joining the Fourteenth Indiana, which had been on duty at 
this mountain-pass some weeks. The enemy was in superior force fifteen miles in front, and 
almost every day attacked the pickets, giving frequent opportunities for skirmishing, requiring 
the regiment to be formed for battle promptly during the day and at night, and showing the 
necessity for strengthening the position by felling trees, preparing abattis, and throwing out 
heavy pickets to prevent surprise and to be prepared for any emergency. The position being 
considered important, and enemy in front enterprising, the camp was re-enforced by the Twenty- 
Fifth Ohio. 

The night of September llth was stormy, with heavy rain. The raw pickets, not yet taught 
the importance of special vigilance at such times, were careless ; and at break of day on the 12th 
the camp was surrounded by a largely-superior force of Rebel soldiers. Fortunately the abattis 
on the left of the camp of the Twenty-Fourth proved efficient, caused delay in the movements 
of the enemy, and gave time to form the troops for battle, which was done promptly. In this, 
their first engagement, the Twenty-Fourth gave indications of that coolness and discipline for 
which the regiment was at a later period distinguished. After a combat of three hours the Rebels 
abandoned the attack and fled, leaving on the field many blankets, arms, etc., losing some prison 
ers and some killed. The loss of the Twenty-Fourth was only two wounded. 

The next engagement in which the Twenty-Fourth took part was at Grecnbrier, Virginia, 
October 3, 1861. It was here exposed to a heavy fire of shell, grape, and canister, but stood 
firm. Its loss was onlvtwo killed and three wounded. The service in the mountains of Virginia 
was arduous, requiring the greatest vigilance. 

On November 18th the regiment inarched from Cheat Mountain, under orders for Louisville, 
Kentucky; reported at that place on the 28th of the same month, and was assigned to duty in 
the Tenth Brigade, Fourth Division, Army of the Ohio. On February 25th, 1862, it reached 
Nashville, Tennessee, and remained there in camp until March 17th, when the division took up 
the line of march for Savannah and Fittsburg Landing. 

The bridge over Duck River at Columbia, Tennessee, having been burned by the Rebels, 
and the stream being very high, the army was detained some days repairing the bridge. 1 efore 
this was done (the river having fallen) the Fourth Division was ordered to advance. It waded 
tht> river March 29th and hurried on to Savannah, on the Tennessee River, which place it 
reached on Saturday, April 5th, and went into camp. As the swamp on the right bank of the 
Tennessee was deemed impassable, boats were to be sent to transport the troops to Pittsburg 
Landing, twelve miles up the river. 

On Sunday morning, April 6th, the roar of the artillery at Pittsburg Landing was heard at 
Savannah. The troops were immediately put in readiness to move. No boats arriving to trans 
port them, at one o clock P. M. the Tenth Brigade (to which the Twenty-Fourth belonged) started 



172 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

through the swamp, the other brigades of the division following; and, after a hard march 
through mud and water, reached the opposite bank of the river, were ferried across by the 
steamboats, and took part in the battle that evening on the extreme left. On April 7th the 
Twenty-Fourth was engaged all day in the battle, and not only sustained its former reputation, 
but added new laurels. Major Hall was here severely wounded. The loss was small, consider 
ing the desperate nature of the conflict, amounting only to four killed and twenty-eight enlisted 
men wounded. 

The Twenty-Fourth took part in most of the skirmishes between Pittsburg Landing and 
Corinth, and was one of the first regiments that entered the latter place. It was with the army 
in the pursuit of the enemy in North Mississippi and North Alabama, and in July was encamped 
at McMinnvillle, Tennessee. 

It left that place September 3d and returned to Louisville, Kentucky, with the army din-ing 
General Bragg s invasion, having a long, dusty, and greatly-dispiriting march. In October, 
1862, it was assigned to the Fourth Division, Twenty-First Army Corps. 

It was at the battle of Perryville, but, being on the extreme right, did not take part in the 
general engagement. It then moved in the pursuit of the retreating army ; and, on the aban 
donment of the chase in the mountains of south-eastern Kentucky, it marched to Nashville. 

When, in December, 1862, General Rosecrans advanced from Nashville, the Twenty-Fourth 
was reduced, by sickness, desertion, and other losses, to thirteen officers and three hundred and 
forty men. Company A, however, was on detached duty. With this strength it went into the 
battle of Stone River. Its loss was heavy, the regiment having been assigned an important 
position, and having held it faithfully. Colonel F. C. Jones, Major H. Terry, and Lieutenant 
Harmon were killed the first day, and Lieutenant Horton was severely wounded. The command 
of the regiment devolved on Major Weller, who was killed the second day, Captain A. T. M. 
Cockerill commanding the remainder of the day. Lieutenants Archer, Diehl, and Draeger were 
wounded. The loss was commissioned officers, four killed, four wounded; men, ten killed, 
sixty-nine wounded (ten of these mortally). In other words, the regiment lost in this battle one- 
fourth of the entire strength with which it went into it. 

Numerous promotions now occurred to fill the sad vacancies thus caused. The Twenty- 
Fourth was next in the affair at Woodbury, Tennessee, January 24, 1863, but its loss here was 
small. After a long rest through the spring and summer, it advanced with the army on Tulla- 
homa, and was on duty at Manchester, Tennessee, until the advance on Chattanooga. It was in 
the engagement at Lookout Mountain ; also in the battle of Chickamauga, with a loss of Captains 
Wadsworth and Dryden killed, together with a large number of men. Colonel D. J. Higgins 
and Major T. M. McClure were dismissed the service for bad conduct in this action. The 
regiment was next in the battle of Mission Ridge, and in pursuit of the enemy in the affair at 
Taylor s Ridge, near Ringgold. 

It was now assigned to the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, and was in an engagement 
near Dalton, with a loss of two killed and eight wounded. In April, 1864, the Twenty-Fourth 
was sent to Chattanooga to await orders for mustering out. On the 15th of June it received 
orders to proceed to Columbus for that purpose ; and on the 24th of June it was mustered out 
and discharged. 

Company D, of the Twenty -Fourth, re-enlisted as veteran volunteers, to serve during the war. 

The colors of the regiment were presented to the State, to be placed in the archives for pres 
ervation, Colonel A. T. M. Cockerill turning them over with a few pertinent remarks. In 
response Governor Brough said : 

" Colonel, Officers, and Soldiers of the Twenty-Fourth : I thank you in behalf of the people of the 
State of Ohio, not only for the colors, but for having borne them so nobly and gallantly as you 
have throughout the three years service. They come worn and tattered ; but there is not a rent 
in them that is not honorable, and an emblem of your bravery and gallantry. No regiment that 
haa gone from Ohio has endured hardships with greater cheerfulness or more nobly discharged 
its duty. Yes, Sir (turning to the Colonel), no matter what the future may bring forth, no regi- 



TWENTY-FOURTH OHIO INFANTRY. 173 

merit can occupy a better position than the one you have had the honor to command, I shall 
place these banners in the archives of the State as historic mementoes worthy of any people. 
Again, soldiers, I thank you." 

These flags were presented to the regiment the regimental flag by General Jacob A mm en, 
then its Colonel, and the National colors by the Sixth Ohio, better known as the "Guthrie 
Grays," of Cincinnati. The flag from the Sixth Ohio bears this inscription: "The Sixth Ohio 
to the Twenty-Fourth Ohio: Sluloh, April 7, 1862," and was presented to the regiment during 
the siege of Corinth by the late lamented General Wm. Nelson, then commander of the Fourth 
Division, Army of the Ohio (to which both the regiments at that time belonged), in behalf of 
the officers and men of the Sixth. 

These flags have passed through the bloody fields of Pittsburg Landing and Stone River, 
where Colonel Fred. Jones, Lieutenant-Colonel Terry, Major Weller and Captain Harmon sealed 
their devotion to their country with their heart s blood. They were at the brilliant dash at 
Woodbury; in the terrible strife at Chickamauga, whgere Wadsworth and Dryden fell in their 
Nation s cause. They waved through the fierce struggle for the possession of Lookout Mountain, 
and the gallant charge on Mission Ridge. They were borne in the murderous assault on Taylor s 
Ridge at Ringgold; and last, but not least, in the bold reconnoissance of the gallant Palmer, 
so stubbornly resisted by the enemy at Buzzard s Roost Gap and Rocky Face Ridge. At Stone 
River the battle-ax was shot from the staff, and two balls passed through the staff. The holes 
made by twenty-three distinct bullets at Stone River may be seen in the flag itself, together with 
many more received on other memorable occasions. Three Color-Sergeants of the regiment were 
killed and seven severely wounded while bravely carrying their standards in the front line of 
battle. Two of them were killed at Stone River within five minutes of each other, and one at 
Chickamauga. 



174 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



25th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE 


r i: 


\NK. COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS 


Colonel 
Do 


.JAMES A. JONES 
W31. P. R1CIIAKDSOX... 
N ATHAN L HAUGllTON 
JAMES A. JOXES 

WM. P. KiCHAKDSON 


June 
May 

June 

SK 

May 
Juiy 
May 
June 


12, 

- . , 
10, 
22, 
Hi, 
30 
13, 
13, 
2f>, 
1". 


1861 

IS6- ; 
ls.,6 
18til 

1S62 

1863 
18H4 
ISM 
18(jl 


June 

May 
June 

Aug. 
M ay- 
July 
31 ay 
June 


l "i! 

25, 
10, 
22, 
24, 
16, 
25 
13, 
25, 
10, 


1861 

1 M*/* 

lNi6 

18C.1 

1 s(>2 
IM;., 

1SI>4 
1861 


Resigned 3Iav \t\, 1862. 
3Iustered out 31ay 9, 1866. 
31ustereil out as Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Colonel. 


Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
D.. 


JAS. F. CHARLKSWOUTH .... 

JEREMIAH WIM.IAMS 


iesiuned Julv 30. is. ,2. 
Itesiuned Mav 1.",, 18iv!. 
Resigned June 20, 1-64. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
3Iustered out as Major. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Declined 


Do 


E C < n.p 


Major 
l>. 
Do 
Do 


\\"M. P. Ricii.uuisoN 


GKOKGE WEBSTER 


May 


|,- 


] ^tV> 


Ausr. 
June 


28, 
24, 
I*S 


IS .: 1 

l^l i 


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Mav 16, 1S62. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel July 30, 1862. 
1 romoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned August 4, I8hp>. 


Do 
Do. . 


JEREMIAH WILLIAMS 
JOHN W. Bowi.rs 


iig 


30 
13 


ISt i, , 


Do 
Do. . 


NATHANIEL HAUGHTON 
C. It. RANDALI 


Aug. 

Jan. 
31 ay 
July 


4 

11 
6 

26; 


18rt4 

1-tiii 
ISIil 


Sept. 

ix 

May 

;-[;: 


.>. 
16, 

111 


18f t 
1865 

l,si . 

1862 


Promoted t<> Lieutenant-( 1 olotiel. 
Died of wounds Xovemher M, 1864. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out as Captain. 
Transferred to Twenty-Fourth Regiment. 
Mustered out. 


Do. . 


K C Ci LP 


Po 


LUTHEK B. MESXARD 
D\VID WELSH 




Jj c , 
Do. 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Captain 


L. G. 3lYEi: 


G. It. WEEKS 
LAWRENCE G. AXHUKWS.... 
WM [ DF\N 


July 

Sept. 

July 
Oct. 
Aug. 

J une 


13 , 

f 

1 


18l>l 
I8fi2 
1864 

lM ,1 


July 
Feb. 

July 

( let. 

A ut:. 
July 


111 

23, 

]- 


1NU 

I M; 


Promoted Surgeon T\\ en tv- Fourth Regiment. 
Resigned 31 a v 22, 1N>. ,. 
Deceased September 17, 1862. 
Proninted to Surtreon. 
.Mustered nut with regiment. 
Promoted to Maior May 16, 1862. 


WM. WALTON 
E. 31. \\ ILSON 
James F. Charleeworth 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Ho 
[>o 
Do 
Do! 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Jeremiah Williams 
Viron C Jii 11*011 


Sept. 


4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 







12, 

1- . 
12, 

l 


Resi-ned Julv 7, 1M.2. 

Promoted to 3Iajor Julv ?,0, 1862. 
Transferred to Twelfth" Battery 0. V. A. 
Resigned June 2, 1863. 
Resigned May 10, 18f,;>,. 
Resigned October 20, 18fi2. 
Deceased September 5, 1862. 


Mosos It. Clowe!! 
Jolin F. Oliver 
Asa Wav 
Lewis 11. Green 
John 31. Mosl.-.v 
lonatlian Brown 

Will. Afkew 


" 


Oct. 


i V 


ii 


Resigned 31areh 20, 1862. 
Kesimied 31 ay 13, 1863. 


Do 


has. B. Junes 
Niithani.-l llau-htoit 
John D Merrvniaii 


July 

o ( ;f 

Sept. 

31 arch 

Oct. 
March 


; , 

2C 

5 
2< 
24 

2i 
1 
15 

U 


1863 
1864 


Dee. 

Jan. 
May 

June 
Oct. 
March 


L6, 
16, 
30, 
30, 
l-\ 
25, 
2-">, 
15, 
2, 
15, 
15, 
15, 


18t>3 

18(-.| 


Resigned 31areh 24, 1863. 
Promoted to 3lajor. 
tevoked. 
Pit-signed Mav 17, 1803. 
{evoked ; resigned as 2d Lieut. April 1, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned September 1, 1864. 
Mustered out April 13. 1865. 
Commission returned, 
on detached dutv at muster out of regiment. 
Mustered out. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
I) 
Do 
D.. 




\lfred G Corii"liu< 


Nuthiuiid J. Manning 
C. R. Randall 
John T. Wood 
James 3Iailis..n Barr 
Ilenrv 11. Moslev 
David It. Hunt 
John 11. Millman 


Do! 

D.. 
Do 
D.. 


Luther 15. McMiiir.l 
Israel Whits . 
Ge.,rge N. llolc.iiiili 
P.. 3lcCoiinaugh 


May 
Aug. 


11 
11 

1! 


- 


May 

Aug. 


I"! . 
11. 
11. 


;; 


Pr.iinoted to 31a.|or. 
3lu>tere.i out wivh regiment. 


3Iu.teivd "lit with regiment. 
Clustered out with regiment. 
Mu<teivd nut with regiment. 
Honorably discharged April 25, 1865. 


Do 
Do 


Michael 31nrrav ... 
Win. 31. Kin-... 


Jan. 


i~ 




Jan. 


]-, 


1 -(v> 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


John 0. Archibald 
Wm. P.Scott 

\],.\ MattNi U 


Feb. 

Sept. 

March 

June 


II 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


Idfifi 
1861 


Feb. 

Sept. 
March 

July 


10. 

4, 

2; , 
12*, 

12, 
12, 

12, 
12, 


1866 
1861 


Killed. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain July 7, 1862. 
Resigned Octob-r 31. 18i-;2. 
Transferred to Twelfth Battery. 
Promoted to Captain May 16, 1862. 
Resigned April 27, 1-62. 


Elisha BiguMstatV 


Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do! 
Do. 
Do. 

!!::: 

D . 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

ft: 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 


( lias. U. Jones 
Win. P. Reichner 
Darius Dili-lain 
John W. P.owlu* 
John W. Itos- 


F ram-is A. Davis 
James 11. Pettay 
NathunierMlaughlon 
Win. 1,. Hoyt 

Art liiir Iliggin- 
John D. Merryman 
I- ra Hi-is D. Sinclair 
Nathaniel J. 31anning 


4 
-1 " 


1-J. " 
11 , " 


Honorably discharged September 11, 1S62. 
Resigned Deer-mber 21, 1-el. 


July 
net. 
Jan. 

March 

April 
\ \ a v 
April 
May 

July 


1 
lt> 

i ! 

i \ 

3(, 
30, 


LS)L 


July 
Oct. 

April 

July 
Aug. 


1. 
16, 
9, 
t) t 
10, 
3, 
v3, 

ft 

16, 
16, 


1862 


Resimied January 23, lsf.3. 
romoted to Captain October 20, 1862. 
rom. Sept. 15, 1N.2: lion, disch d Dec. 30, 62. 
Resigned March I: , lM ,2. 
J romoted to Captain, 
leelined to accept. 
RiSiylled September I .t. 181)2. 

Itesigned February 1. 18(3. 
Revoke 1. 
Il.murablv discharged October 26, 1863. 
Killed May (i, Ifiii.". 


B-iij. W. Blandy 

Jalll-5 Tempi. -I, .11 

John T. \\,-.,..| 
George W. 3Iartin 
Alex. Sinclair 



TWENTY-FIFTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



175 



RANK. 


NAME. 


D.VTi: OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 






11, 1862 
19, " 
30, || 


Dec. IS, lSf.2 
30, " 
30, " 

" 30, " 


Revoked. 

tesii, n<>d July 2S, 1863. 
Mustered out 3Iarch 20, ISM. 
lied June, 18C.3. 
Promoted to Captain. 


1 llOIUHS ,) JalllleV 


June 

Sept. 


1 It in v 11 M.le\ 


Wm. A. White-raft 


Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

>0. 

>o. 

>o. 

Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

DO: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

>o. 

>0. 

2d Li uU iiant 
)o. 
. Hi. 
)o 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

So 1 : 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
]><>. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

1)0. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Andrew j! Halt- 
David R. Hunt 

Edward ( Cnlp 


Jan. 

Feb. 

.March 


23, 1863 
23, " 

!;iS 

20, " 
, " 


Feb. 20, isi;:; 

March 30, " 
April 8, " 
24, " 
Jan. 15, " 

15, " 


tevoked : resigned as 2d Lieutenant, 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 
Hscharged M^arch 25, 1864. 
romoted to Captain. 


lolui 11 Millinan 


Isaac N. Kirk 
Israel White 


Lewis !]. Wils,.n 

i, .soph 11. ii. .iiis 

J-uiics \ l>-i""s 


July 

March 


1, " 

15, 1864 

!;>, " 
15, " 

15, " 

15, " 

15, " 


\tf. 1, " 
March 15, lS(i| 

is :: 

15, " 
15, " 
15, " 
15, " 


\ill> d at Gettysburg July 1, 1863. 
villeil at Gettysburg J uly 1, 1863. 
lonorably discharged April 12, 1864. 
romoted to Captain, 
tesi.mied April 20, 1864. 
romoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 


George X. Hob-mill. 
Charl. s 11. Kinu 
H. McCoimangh 
Win. F IMiton 


Win. Mub.ny 


Michad .Murray 
John 0. Archibald 
Win. I . Scott 
loliu 11 K -hn 
Alex. Mattisoii 
1- lisha, M.""-erxtalf 


April 
May 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Fan. 

Feb. 

May 

Sept. 

June 

" 

July 


13, " 

25, 
25, " 
25, 

11, " 
11, " 

11, " 
11, " 
11. |] 

ti JSt) r "> 

10 " 

10, " 
l.s, " 

is, " 

18, " 
4, " 
!> " 
29, " 
2 J, " 
21), 
2 J, " 

15, 186(1 
4, KMil 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 


\pril 13, " 
.May 25, " 

|| 25, || 

vug. 11! " 
n, " 
11, " 
n " 
" H " 

Oct. 12, " 

18, " 

Fan. 6, 18(15 

Feb. 10, " 

10, " 
3Iay !>, " 
18, " 
18, " 
Sept. 4, " 
, " 
29, 
29, 
29, " 
29, 
29, " 
June 15, l.%i; 
July 12, 1861 
" 12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
" 12, " 
" 22, " 
" 22, " 
12, " 
12, " 


romoted to Captain, 
romoted to (Jap tn i n. 

lesigned July 8, 1865. 
;romoted to Captain. 

lon!!rVldy discVi aru ed April 2f>, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment, 
tesigned January 18, 1--65. 
)eceased. 
Honorably discharged March 27, 18G5. 
Mustered out. 
)eceased. 
)ied April 8, 1865. 
Mustered out willi regiment, 
tesigned July 25, 1865. 
Resigned Julv 18, 1865. 
Resigned 31arch 2 i. ISM. 
Captain One Hundr.id and Fourth U. S. C. T. 
Mustered out as Regimental ljuartermaster. 
Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 
Mustered our with regiment. 
Mustered out as I d Lieutenant. 
Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 
Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 
Vbsent at date of muster out. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant October 16, 1861. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 9, 1862. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant January 9, 1862. 
transferred to Twelfth Battery. 
Resigned December 21, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant April 27, 1S62. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant May 6, 1862. 
Promoted ; resigned June 30, 1862. 
Resigned October 6, 1862. 
IxeHigned October 28, 1861. 


Oliver W. Williams 
l.ihn ( . Livensparger 
Ilezekiah Thomas 
Phineas Gano 


SolonuMi Ehersole 
S T Ilutchinson 


Maurice S. Hell 
Au.-tin Ilaughton 
Ethan W. Guthrie 
Win. L. Fonts 


^aniuel K. Stewart 
Hiver P. H-rsliev 
Thomas II. Ferrall 
Win. J. Kyh- 
Samuel .1. Hrooks 
Jc.hu Walton 
George W Jdcn 




D ivid Mc(inckiii 


H. Volney Howard 
Arthur Higuins 
lolin D. Merrymau 
Francis 1). Sinclair 
Archihald McClellan 
Andrew J . Hale 
lames Templ -toii 
Henj W Hlandy 




1 -lines 1, Hall 


Harlan Millikin 
Henj. F. I law kes 


Nathaniel .J. .Manning 
Henry 11. Mosley 
Thomas J. .launey 
Carrinsrton 10. Randall 
Win. A. Whitcralr 
\k-\ Sinclair. ... 


Jan. 
March 

May 

ky 

July 
Se^t. 

Oct. 

June 
Sept. 


9, 1SC.2 
9, 
8, || 

1 2, 

\7\ " 
HI, " 
30, " 
11, " 
11, " 
20, " 
3o. " 
! ., " 


Ian. 9, 1802 
" 9, " 

March V, " 
April 8, " 
10, " 
June 3. " 
Au^. 16, " 
lt>, " 
l(i, " 
Sept. 2o, " 


I romoted to 1st, Lieutenant March 12, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 30, 1862. 
I romoted to 1st Lieutenant September 19, 62. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant October 20, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant July 30, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant September 11, 62. 
Resigned March 6 186, 


Edward (, . illp* 
Samuel P. Houston 
Edward II. Severance 
John 11 Millman 


I romoted ; discharge.! March 20, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Discharged April 2, 1863. 


Win. 11. Davis 


Win M-tlonv 


30, " 

30, " 

" :-}( , " 

" 3< , " 
Feb. 20, 18C.3 
March 30, " 
April 8, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


ISTIC \ K i rk 






I M Perrv 


Resigned April 18, 1863. 
Resigned November 7, 1863. 
I romoted to 1st Lieutenant 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Alfred A. Lanipkin 
Israel White 
Joseph 11. lloilis 


Jan. 
March 

?i- 
" 

April 


23, 1863 
6, " 
11, 1862 


James A. Driggs 
George N. Ilolcoml. 
Chas. H. King 
H. McComiMiu h 
Win. F. Ulooii 


1, " 
24, " 
18, " 
1, " 


May 2 ; || 

June 1 , " 
1 , " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


John O Archil. aid 


July 

March 


30 " 
Iti, 1-64 


July 3 , " 
March 1 , 1864 


Win. P. Sci.1t 


Alex. Mattison 
Elisha Hi""er<taff 


Feb. 
April 
May 

Oct. 


l.V, " 

25*, " 

U5, 
11 , " 


March 1 , " 
April 1 , " 
May 2 \ || 

Oct. 1 i " 
1 , " 
1 , " 
1 , " 
1 , " 
1 , " 
1 , " 
Nov. l,s, " 
" l.s " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
I romote.rto 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
I romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned Julv 15, 1865. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Pr.mmteil t.. 1st. Lieutenant. 


Oliver W. Williams 
John S Snvd-T 


John/ , Livensparger 


Et hail W Gulhrie 


Nov. 


12, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17, " 
17 " 
IS,. " 
18, *" 
I.-. " 


Win. L. Fonts 


Peter Triiiuait 
Simiuel K. Stewart 


Win. Me Fee 


Thomas II. Fer.all 
Wm. J. Kvle 



176 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK 


. COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Samuel J. Brooks 


F< 

M 

Se 

,\ 


b. 10, ISf 
10, 

Pt. 4] 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
ril 2, k 
no L>, 

IS, 


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.M 
St 

"> A 
,h 


3b. 10, IS 
10, 
ay IS, 
pt. 

pril 2] It 
ne l. r >, 


55 

6 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


John Wai too 
George W. Iden 


Dan. J. Crooks 
D. Volnev Howard 
David McGuckin 


John S. Dunn 


James 11. Smith 
John 31. Rhodes 


John WVyer : 
James B. Hentliorn 
Sainii"! G. Shirk 


John H. Saunders 


Garwood P Lacy 


" 15, " 


15; " 





TWENTY-FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE TWENTY-FIFTH was composed of men from almost every section of the 
State, and was organized at Camp Chase on the 28th of June, 1861. On the 29th of 
July it proceeded to Western Virginia, and was stationed along the Baltimore and Ohio 
Kailroad from Oakland to the Ohio Kiver. Scouting parties were sent out from the different 
posts, and several gangs of bushwhackers were broken up. The regiment was relieved on the 
21st of August, and, after a fatiguing march, reported to Gene^vl Reynolds at Beverly. After a 
short halt it marched up Cheat Mountain and encamped on the summit. During the fall and 
winter the troops at this point suffered severely. They were continually on duty, either in the 
fort or on the picket-line. Sleet or snow fell almost daily ; the men of the Twenty-Fifth were 
totally unprovided with overcoats, and many of them were without shoes or blankets. 

The camp at Cheat Mountain remained comparatively quiet until the morning of the 12th of 
September, when a wagon-train on its way to the valley for rations was surprised and captured. 
Companies H and D, of the Twenty-Fifth, were sent immediately in pursuit of the Eebels. Com 
pany H soon met them, and, being re-enforced, it drove them to their main supports, when it was 
discovered that the enemy was present in force, under the command of General Robert E. Lee. 
Preparations were made for a strenuous defense. Every available man was placed on picket- 
duty, and for eight days the skirmishing was continuous. At the end of this time troops from 
the valley succeeded in breaking through the Rebel lines, bringing with them to the summit 
supplies of provisions, and the Rebel commander, seeing the futility of his efforts, withdrew. 

On the 3d of October General Reynolds marched with several Regiments from the summit 
against the Rebel works at Greenbrier. After several hours fighting the expedition returned to 
the summit without having accomplished anything of importance. The Twenty-Fifth was 
engaged, and was the last regiment to leave the field. On the 25th of November it marched into the 
valley, and went into winter-quarters at Huttonsville. Several companies, under Captain Wash- 
burn, were sent to Elkwater. The duty in the valley was light, and an opportunity was afforded for 
the men to recover from the exposure on the mountain. On the llth of December a detachment 
from the regiment, numbering four hundred and sixty men, under Colonel Jones, participated in 
an expedition against the enemy at Camp Baldwin. At one o clock on the morning of the 13th 
the force was distributed for the attack. Colonel Jones, with his detachment, and with detach 
ments from the Thirty-Second Ohio and Thirteenth Indiana, was to advance to the right and rear 




GIIAVF.S OF OHIO SOLDI KKS. LIBIJY PRISON, RICHMOND, VA. 



TWENTY-FIFTH OHIO INFANTRY. 177 

of the enemy s camp, and there await the attack in front. Owing to a succession of blunders the 
attack was not made in front at the proper time ; and the Rebels having discovered the position of 
Colonel Jones, he was forced to make an immediate attack or to retire. He chose the former 
course, and at daylight he advanced his line and at once became engaged. The Rebels were driven 
in, but being re-enforced, they made a stand, and for three hours the fight raged. Three times the 
Rebels were driven into their cabins, and were compelled to fire from the windows ; but at last the 
troops under Colonel Jones exhausted their ammunition and were compelled to retire, which 
they did in perfect order, and without molestation from the enemy. In this engagement the 
regiment lost nine killed and seventy-five severely wounded. On the return march it traveled 
sixty miles in twenty-six hours. On the 31st the regiment moved on a raid to Huntersville. It 
marched one hundred and six miles in five days, penetrated far into the enemy s country, met 
and dispersed considerable numbers of Rebels, and destroyed large quantities of Confederate 
stores. At the time this expedition was regarded as one of the greatest feats of the war. While 
at Huttonsville company D was detached permanently as a battery of artillery, and was armed 
with Wiard s steel guns. It was afterward known as the Twelfth Ohio Battery. 

On the 27th of February, 1862, the Twenty-Fifth marched to Beverly. Here the "smooth 
bores " were turned over to the ordnance officer, and the regiment was armed with Vincennes 
rifles. They were very effective pieces, but proved too heavy, and were gradually exchanged for 
Springfield rifles. On the 1st of April the regiment moved on the Seneca scout. It crossed 
Cheat and Alleghany Mountains, passed through Circleville, and arrived at Monterey, having 
marched one hundred and twenty-five miles through a country entirely new to National troops. 
At Monterey the regiment was joined by a similar expedition, sent by way of Camp Alleghany. 
On the 12th General Johnston, who had retired from Monterey upon the advance of the National 
troops, made an attack on that point, but, after a sharp engagement, he was repulsed ; and on the 
arrival of General Milroy with the remainder of the division, he fell back to McDowell. On 
the 18th Milroy moved forward to McDowell, and the Rebels retreated to Staunton. The .troops 
remained quietly in camp at McDowell until the 7th of May, when a large Rebel force, under 
Johnston and Jackson, made its appearance. Heavy forces of skirmishers were thrown out, and 
a general engagement was delayed until the 8th, when General Schenck, with his brigade, 
arrived, and the battle of Bull-Pasture Mountain was fought. The Twenty-Fifth opened the 
battle by a charge, in which the enemy was driven from his position. Re-enforcements were 
sent forward rapidly on both sides, and the battle assumed a serious character. It continued till 
after nightfall, and, as darkness settled down upon the mountain, a blazing circle of light from 
ten thousand muskets still revealed the position of the opposing armies. It was deemed expe 
dient to fall back to Franklin, and the troops were withdrawn gradually. The Twenty-Fifth 
remained until the last regiment had retired, and then it covered the retreat. Its loss in this 
engagement was nine killed and fifty-six wounded. 

On the 26th of May the regiment accompanied General Fremont on his march from Frank 
lin to Strasburg, and thence up the Shenandoah Valley in pursuit of Jackson,, and participated 
in the battle of Cross Keys, with a loss of eight killed, fifty-four wounded, and two missing. 
After a short rest at Strasburg the regiment, in July, passed with Sigel s corps into Eastern Vir 
ginia, and participated in General Pope s campaign along the lines of the Rappahannock, and 
from the Rapidan to the plains of Manassas, where, on the 29th and 30th of August, it engaged 
in the second battle of Bull Run, with a loss of ten killed, seventy-eight wounded, and twenty- 
two missing. On the evening of the 30th the regiment fell back to Centerville, and on the 3d 
of September it moved, by way of Fairfax C. H., to Upton Hill, having marched, since the 8th 
of August, two hundred and twenty miles, having been under fire fourteen successive days on 
the Rappahannock, and having participated in the second battle of Bull Run. From this time 
until the spring of 1863 the Twenty-Fifth was engaged in marches and counter-marches, and in 
building numerous sets of winter-quarters, until at last it settled down quietly near Brooke s 
Station. Battalion drill was practiced daily, and every effort was made to prepare the troops 
for the spring campaign. 

VOL. 1112. 



178 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

On the 27th of April, 1863, the army broke camp and started on the Chancellorsville cam 
paign, and on the 30th it encamped around Chancellorsville. Never was a march better con 
ducted, and it is worthy of note that the Twenty-Fifth left Brooke s Station with four hundred and 
forty-three men and took four hundred and forty-four men into camp at Chancellorsville, one man 
having joined from hospital, and not one having straggled from the ranks during the march. 
The regiment was in the Second Brigade of the First Division of the Eleventh Corps. The First 
Brigade of the division occupied the extreme right, and the Second Brigade was on the imme 
diate left of the first. The picket-line extended along the front, but did not cover the right of 
the division. Only two or three sentinels were posted on the right, and these but a short distance 
from the outer regiments. Thus lay on the afternoon of May 2d the right wing of an army of 
one hundred thousand men. Colonels Richardson and Lee, of the Twenty-Fifth and Fifty-Fifth 
Ohio, felt the impending danger and quietly sent some tried scouts into the wilderness to the 
right of the division. They soon returned with the intelligence that the Rebels were massing 
heavily on the right and rear of the corps, and that there were no pickets between the two armies. 
The two Ohio Colonels hurried with this intelligence to division head-quarters, but the General 
commanding told them that their men "were probably scared," and sent them back to their 
regiments. 

An hour afterward and Stonewall Jackson with his veteran troops came down upon the 
unprepared division. Several regiments in the First Brigade had their guns in stack, and many 
of the men were eating their supper. The surprise was complete. No solitary picket-shot told 
of the approaching danger, no rattling skirmish heralded the coming storm ; but one solid shot, 
crashing through the Second Brigade and post division head-quarters, was followed by the 
thunder of twenty thousand muskets and the deafening roar of artillery. The First Brigade gave 
way in confusion, the men not stopping to unbuckle their knapsacks, but cutting the straps with 
their knives. The Twenty-Fifth deployed, changed front, and moved forward some one hundred 
yards, exposed to a merciless fire, under the disadvantage of having men from other regiments 
breaking through its ranks. The Fifty-Fifth and Seventy-Fifth Ohio joined the ranks of the 
Twenty-Fifth, and these three regiments held their position until the broken fragments of the 
First Brigade had passed to their rear and the enemy had encircled them on three sides, and then 
they, too, fell back. The next morning the corps was reorganized, and it remained in the 
trenches until the 5th, when, with the army, it recrossed the river and went into its old camp at 
Brooke s Station. In this engagement the regiment lost seventeen killed, one hundred and 
twenty wounded, and thirty-seven missing. 

On the 27th of June the regiment started on the Gettysburg campaign, with General Barlow 1 
in command of the division and General Ames in command of the brigade. The Eleventh Corps 
passed over the Bull Run battle-field, crossed the Potomac at Edwards s Ferry, marched through 
Maryland, and arrived at Emmettsburg on the 29th. On the 1st of July the corps moved toward 
Gettysburg, with Barlow s division in advance. Upon reaching the town the division was placed 
in position and became engaged almost immediately, and for a short time drove the enemy before 
it. The Twenty-Fifth was ordered to support Battery G, of the Fourth United States Artillery, 
and it took position under a most trying cannonade. Soon a general advance was ordered, and 
the entire division moved forward, but after fighting obstinately for an hour it fell back to Ceme 
tery Hill. Here the Twenty-Fifth, numbering forty-five men and commanded by a Second- 
Lieutenant, was deployed as skirmishers on the outskirts of the town, while the remainder of the 
division was placed behind stone fences. On the 2d and 3d the regiment still occupied the 
advanced lines and suffered severely from sharp-shooters, and on the morning of the 4th it led 
the advance into Gettysburg. The majority of the officers had been killed or wounded, and the 
regiment was commanded by a First-Lieutenant, who had been wounded in the first day s battle. 
The Twenty-Fifth went into action with two hundred and twenty men, and lost twenty killed, one 
hundred and thirteen wounded, and fifty missing. 

On the afternoon of the 5th the regiment moved in pursuit of the Rebels, marching through 
Emmettsburg, Frederick City, Middletown, Boonsboro , and Hagerstown. At the latter city the 



TWENTY-FIFTH Oino INFANTRY. 179 

division supported Kilpatrick s cavalry in a lively skirmish, driving the Rebel cavalry and 
infantry through Hagerstown to their main supports. On .the 25th Warrcnton Junction was 
reached, where the regiment remained in camp until the Gth of August, when, with its division, 
it moved for the Department of the South, and took up quarters on Folly Island. The regiment 
at this time numbered seventy-two men and was commanded by a Lieutenant. It subsequently 
removed to Morris Island and took part in the siege of Fort Wagner. After the capture of the 
fort it went into camp on Folly Island beach and an opportunity was afforded for rest and 
recuperation. 

On the 1st of January, 18G4, the regiment re-enlisted, and on the 15th it started for Ohio on 
veteran furlough. It was furloughed from Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, on the 3d of February, 
and on the 5th of March it rendezvoused at Camp Chase. Many recruits were added to the regi 
ment and one entirely new company, company L>, was consolidated with company C, and the new 
company was designated company B. On the IGth the regimental flags, which had passed through 
twenty battles, and under which eighteen color-bearers had been killed or wounded, were pre 
sented to Governor Brough for the State archives, and the regiment received a beautiful stand of 
new colors. The regiment left Camp Chase on the same day and was transported by way of 
Cleveland, Buffalo, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, to Camp Grant, Virginia, where 
it remained a month preparing for the field, and on the 23d of April it embarked at Alexandria 
on the "Admiral Dupont," and arrived at Hilton Head, South Carolina, on the 26th. 

On the 28th it went on duty on the picket-line which formed the inside defenses of the Sea 
Islands. The posts were reduced to the least possible number, and yet the men were frequently 
on duty several days in succession. This, together with the malaria from the swamps, produced 
much sickness, and before cold weather came nearly every member of the regiment had been pros 
trated. On the 25th of September companies A, K, and G, were ordered to Fort Pulaski, Geor 
gia, where they remained until the 23d of October, when they rejoined the regiment, and the 
next day it was relieved from the picket-line and was ordered into camp a short distance from 
Hilton Head for rest. On the 2d of November nearly three hundred recruits joined the regiment, 
including one entire company, which was designated company D. The Twenty-Fifth now pre 
sented a good line; a regular course of drill was inaugurated and sustained until the 26th, when 
orders were received to prepare for immediate service. 

On the 28th of November the regiment left Hilton Head in the Coast Division on an expedi 
tion, with the Charleston and Savannah Railroad as the objective point. Several steamers ran 
aground and it was not until the afternoon of the next day that the troops were landed at Boyd s 
Neck, on the main land. On the same evening the column moved forward toward Grahamsville, 
but it became bewildered in the darkness and about midnight encamped near a church. Early 
the next morning the enemy was discovered. Companies A and B were deployed as skirmishers 
and the regiment was placed in line. The right wing was ordered to silence the enemy s artillery 
by a flank movement. This it did and then returned to its place in line. The regiment moved 
forward steadily in support of its skirmishers. The enemy retreated to his works, and the 
brigade moved forward to charge the position. The Twenty-Fifth was placed on the extreme 
right of the second line, the formation being " column by division, right in front." The regiment 
overtook the first line and deployed in support of a New York regiment. A charge was ordered, 
but the first line was broken up considerably in crossing a swamp, and could not take the benefit 
of the advantage gained. The Twenty-Fifth crossed in perfect order, and the sight of a solid 
front, backed by a well-directed volley, caused the Rebels to give way. The regiment changed 
front forward on the tenth company, and continued to advance through an almost impenetrable 
thicket, and under a terrible fire, until within two hundred yards of the enemy s works. A New 
York regiment was to support the Twenty-Fifth, but instead it moved to the rear, and for several 
hours the Twenty-Fifth sustained its position, being altogether out of ammunition a portion of 
the time. At last two regiments came up, and Colonel Haughton, of the Twenty-Fifth, proposed 
to charge if the Colonel on the right would support him. But that officer declined to advance 
without orders, and so the troops were compelled to retire to the first line of battle. The Twenty- 



180 OHIO IN THE WAR 

Fifth was again almost out of ammunition, but it received a supply in time to check an attempted 
flank attack. After dark the troops withdrew from the field to the cover of the gunboats. In 
this engagement the regiment s loss in killed and wounded was one hundred and fifty, and of 
these sixteen were commissioned officers. 

On the morning of the 4th of December the regiment embarked on some small steamers and 
proceeding some distance up the Coosa River disembarked on the main land, and by a rapid 
march flanked and captured an entire Rebel battery. One gun and caisson were hauled by hand 
to Port Royal Ferry, and the others were destroyed. On the 6th the regiment, with the brigade, 
proceeded on steamers up Broad River and effected a landing on Devereaux Neck. The troops 
pushed forward rapidly and soon encountered the enemy posted advantageously on the opposite 
flide of a marsh, which extended the whole length of ITis line. The Twenty-Fifth moved for 
ward and by the aid of the other regiments the works were carried in good style. The enemy 
retreated in some disorder, but made a gallant stand on the west side of the Charleston and 
Savannah Pike, but the terrific fire of the Twenty-Fifth again compelled him to fall back, leav 
ing the killed and wounded on the field. 

On the 8th a reconnoissance was made and the enemy was found intrenched strongly on the 
Charleston and Savannah Railroad, with artillery of considerable caliber. The Twenty-Fifth 
was ordered to cut a road through dense woods to the railroad, in order that the artillery might 
destroy the trains. A skirmish-line was thrown forward, supported by several regiments, and 
the Twenty-Fifth followed immediately after, felling the trees in regular backwoodsman style. 
After clearing the road for about a mile, the troops became actively engaged. Fighting con 
tinued, at intervals, during the day, and at night the troops withdrew to a well-fortified camp 
about two miles east of the railroad. During the day the regiment lost fifty-four men killed and 
wounded. The approach of the Fifteenth and Seventeenth Corps, of Sherman s army, compelled 
the Rebels to evacuate their position on the railroad, and a few days after the regiment, with its 
division, moved up the coast. Skirmishing was frequent and the march was a very severe one. 
On the 26th of February, 1865, the regiment crossed the Ashley River, and marched into 
Charleston, quartering in the South Carolina Depot. 

On the last day of February the regiment moved by railroad to Goose Creek, twenty miles 
from Charleston, with the One Hundred and Seventh Ohio and Fifty-Sixth New York, and marched 
without interruption nearly to the Santee River. Returning, it joined the main portion of the 
division at Briggin s Church, and the whole column marched down the north side of Cooper 
River, and crossed the bay into Charleston on the evening of the 10th. The regiment went into 
quarters in the depot and remained until the 12th, when it crossed the bay and went into camp 
at Mount Pleasant. On the 2d of April the regiment was placed on a steamer and the next day 
it disembarked at Georgetown, South Carolina. Several regiments had already arrived, and 
orders were issued to march on the 5th. The force was commanded by General E. E. Potter, 
and the expedition was ordered by General Sherman for the purpose of destroying all railroad 
communication and rolling stock in Central and Eastern South Carolina. The raid was success 
ful, and in addition to the railroads immense quantities of cotton were destroyed. Engagements 
were fought at Dingle s Mills, Statsburg, Rafting Creek, Boykin s Mills, Swift Creek, and Red 
Hill. On the 20th of April sixteen locomotives and two hundred and forty-five cars, loaded 
with ammunition and clothing, were totally destroyed, and the next day the little army marched 
toward the coast, one hundred and twenty-five miles distant. While encamping on Governor 
Manning s plantation for dinner a staff officer from General Beauregard came to the lines with a 
flag of truce, and stated that the war had probably closed, as Lee had surrendered to Grant, and 
Sherman and Johnston had agreed to a cessation of hostilities. Great was the joy in camp, and 
the remaining one hundred miles to the coast was marched in three days, the last two days each 
man having issued to him, as a ration, two ears of corn. The troops reached Georgetown on the 
25th of April, and on the 28th the regiment was placed on the " W. W. Coit" and taken to 
Charleston, and from there it went into its old camp at Mount Pleasant. 

On the 6th of May the regiment again received marching orders and on the same day it 



TWENTY-FIFTH OHIO INFANTRY. 181 

proceeded to Charleston. The next day it moved into the interior, through Summerville, Ridge- 
ville, Branchville, and Orangeburg, to Columbia, where it arrived on the 25th and camped in the 
grounds of the South Carolina College. Here the regiment performed garrison-duty. In Sep 
tember the counties of Fail-field, Newberry, Edgeiield, Lexington, and Richland, were designated 
as a subdistrict, Lieutenant-Colonel Haughton commanding, and were garrisoned by the Twenty- 
Fifth. During the fall and winter the duty was arduous in the extreme. The country became 
infested with bands of outlaws, and several collisions occurred between them and the soldiers. 
On the 27th of December a private of company C was murdered at Newberry. The murderer 
is still at large. Several of the soldiers were wounded at different times and many attempts at 
assassination were made. Bands of outlaws roamed through the country, killing the negroes 
and committing other depredations, yet receiving such protection from a large mass of the citizens 
that their arrest was almost impossible. On the 30th of April, 1866, the regiment removed to 
Summerville and garrisoned the surrounding country ; and in May a portion of the regiment 
was detached for garrison-duty on the Sea Islands. On the 6th of June orders were received for 
the regiment to proceed to Tod Barracks for muster-out. The next day it left Charleston on the 
steamer Flambeau, for New York, and from there it was transferred by way of the New York 
Central Railroad, to Columbus, Ohio, arriving on the 12th. On the 16th the regiment held its 
last parade in front of the Capitol, the regimental colors were presented to Governor Cox, and on 
the 18th of June, 1866, after having been in the service over five years, the Twenty-Fifth was 
mustered out and discharged. 



182 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



26th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


EDWARD P. FYFFE 
EPHRAIM R. ECKLEY 
\\M. II. YOUNG 
WM. SQUIRES 
WM CL \RK 


June 

Jan. 
April 

June 
Dec. 

as? 
$ 

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July 

March 


10, 

1- 

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lit. 

2J 
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if, 

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15, 

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186! 

1862 
1864 

1861 
1 86 
1864 
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1864 
1.S65 
1861 
18C-3 


June 

Jan. 
April 
Dec. 
June 
Dec. 
April 

July 
June 
Sept. 
July 

.March 


1", 
10, 
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1861 

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Honorablv discharged December IS, 1863. 
Appointed Colonel of M)th Ohio Vol. Infantry. 
Resigned 31 arch 28, 1864. 
Resigned November 17, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned December 4, 1861. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned October 26, 1864. 
Mustered nut with reuime nt. 
Resigned May 14, 1863: dis bility rem d July 9. 
Resigned September 17, 1864. 
Resigned June 20, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned February 19, 1;63. 
Resigned May 11. 1863. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Declined. 
Promoted to Surgeon 
Declined. 
Absent on sick leave at muster out of regt. 
Resigned March 4, 1862. 
Resigned September 29, 1862. 


Lt. Colonel .... 
Do 
Do 
Ho. 


Major 
D< 
Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
DC 
Do 

1)0 

Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Do 
Captain 

Do! 

Do 


CHRISTO R N. DAGENKELD... 
WM. 11. SQUIRES 
NORRIS T. PEATMAN 
1 \M> s SPFNCK 


M. M. STIMMKL 
WM. B. McGAVUAN 
DAVID RUSH 
LEWIS SLUSSEK 
ANDREW SABINK 
WM. H. CRETCHER 


D C H-VLL 


June 
July 
Sept. 
Oct. 
July 
March 


i.-., 

20, 
26, 

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17, 


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1861 
1861 


June 
July 

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F. W. INMAN 

IAMES G. CARR 
L. H. LONG 
EMMOR KIMBER 


Raymond Alston 
lesse Meredith 
Wm. H. Seaton 




5, 
5, 


!! 


Resigned October in, 1861. 
Resigned Au-ust 11,1862. 
Resigned December 5, 1862. 
Promoted to Major 32d regiment. 
Promoted to Major 30th regiment. 
Resigned March 6, 1863. 
Promoted bv President April 20, 1863. 
Resigned October 30, 1861. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to -Major. 
Resigned December 2, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned February 12, 1863. 
Resigned Jnlv 10, 1862. 
Died September 19, 1863. 
Mustered out. [Hascall s staff. 
Declined promotion ; remained on Brig. Gen, 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned January 24, 1864. 
Mustered out January 28, 1865. 
Discharged June 29, 1864. 
Resigned as 1st Lieutenant January 24, 1864. 
Mustered out January 25, 1865. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Major. 
Declined promotion. 
Discharged as 1st Lieutenant July 5, 1S65. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned March 1, 1865. 
Declined promotion. 
Killed June 4, 1864. 
Mustered out February 18, 1865. 
Mustered out as Quartermaster. 
Resigned June 8, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment, 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned November 29, 1861. 
Resigned December 27, 1861. 
Resigned March 20, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned April 1, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted on Brig. Gen. Hascall s staff. 
Resigned June 23, 1M12. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned June 16, 1862. 
Resigned December 7, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned March 20, 1862. 
Resigned April 26, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned June 16, 1862. 
Resigned June 15, 18*12. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


John Ferguson 
-amuel C". Rook 
Samuel D. Henderson 
Washington C. Appier 
Win. 11. Squires 
Norri-* T Peatman. 


July 

Nov. 
Dec. 

Aug. 
July 
Dec. 

Feb. 
Dec. 
March 
April 
Sept. 
April 


1, 
1, 
11, 

I d, 

- . ! 

lL ! 

12, 

11. 
10, 

2, 

;;, 

12! 
2, 

6, 
fii 
20, 
2, 
2, 


1862 

ISI 3 

1S62 

1864 


Nov. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Dec. 

March 

April" 
Slay 

Dec. 
April 


DC 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
IV 
Do 


J,un : S K Ewart 


Samu-. l 11. Ewing 
John H James jr 


E A Hicks 


Wm. H.Ross 


Lewis 1). Adair 
lame* 11. Hume 


Wm. Clark 


Alexander Frazi<-r 
Nathaniel Potter 
lames R. Warren 
Wm. Baldwin 
^unuel H Hamilton 


Do 


James R. Hume 
lani"s A. Barr 
Asahel R. Franklin 


DC 
Do 

Do 


8;;- :::: 


LymanB. Foster 


Feb. 

June 
July 

June 
Nov. 

Dec. 

March 

April 

" 


X 
.I, 

9, 

1", 
10, 
1", 
10, 
10, 
10, 
28, 
28, 
f>, 
% 
" , 
5, 
5, 
1, 
-1, 
11, 
20, 
22, 

8, 
12, 
12, 
23, 
23, 
20, 
20, 

r 


1865 
1861 

1862 


Feb. 
June 

Nov. 

Dec. 

April 


Do 


Philip M. Ogan 
E Guy 


Do. 


Do 
Do 


Cyrus Hill 
Samuel Plaft 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
1st Lieuten nit 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 




J MTV E Coomer 


Benj. Crane 
John Sharp 
Walden Kellv 
Charles D. Brusman 
Norris T. Peatman 


Samuel II. Ewing 
E. E. Hicks 
Charles H. Bean 


Henry C. Brumback.^ 
Peter Dennis 


Wm. H. Ross 


Ilenrv Ilickborn 


Lewis D. Adair 


James R. Hume 
Francis M. Leffler 
John H. J ime-i. jr 
John L. Watson 


Andrew.!. Kendall 
Win. Clark 
Andrew J. Fletter 
James E. Godman 
Alexander Frazier 
David McClelland 
Charles K. Smith 
Nathaniel Potter 



TWENTY-SIXTH OHIO INFANTRY 



183 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF BANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


EKMARKS. 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do! 


James R. Warren 
David McClelland 


April 
June 

July 
June 

Aug. 
Dec. 

Feb. 
April 


2C,, 18fi2 
It) , | 

1 il 

7\ " 

2\ " 
7, " 
3, " 
19, isr.3 
12, 

! !! 
2 l ** 

2, " 


June 
Aug. 
Nov. 

Dec. 

March 

April 

Mav 
April 


1 

I / 

19. 

I 1 , 

19, 
19, 
2fi, 
6, 
6, 
6, 

-"X 
i:X 

2, 


isi.3 

18li4 


Promoted to Captain. 
Killed Dec. 31, 1.M12, at Stone River, Tenn. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to </aptaiu. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Udsi Mi -d February 19 1863 




Win Baldwin. 


Asahel R FraiikJiu 


SHinuel 11. Hamilton 
Win M. Este 


Promoted. 
Resigned April 1, I c fi3 
Promoted to Captain. 
Revoked. 
Killed at Chfckamauga September 19, 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned November 6. l,s<>4. 
Honorably discharged January 14, 1864. 
Promoted t-j Captain. 
Killed September 19, lSf,3. 
Mustered out January 23, 1S63. 
Resigned September 13, Ism. 
Honorably discharged November 15, 1805. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Honorably discharged October 19, 1SC4. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out January 23, 1865. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Declined to accept. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Declined promotion. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Honorably discharged October 4, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Retained in service per Special Order No. W. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant ; Quartermaster. 




James W. Burbriilg . 1 
Francis M. Williams 


Be.nj. F. Grafton 


James G. Morrow 


James W. Burbrid-je 
Luther Timberlake..... 


Benj. W. Shotwell.... 


Win. M. Y.uing 


Philip M. Osran 
\Vm. H. Johnson 


E. Guy 
Cyrus Hill 
Samuel Platt 


Dec. 


2, | 
2, | 

9, 
9, 

y, 

9, 


Dec. 
Feb. 


- , 
2, 
2, 
9, 
9 f 

9, 
9, 

10, 

10! 

10, 


lSf,-> 


Justin A. Goodhut- 
August Spetnagle 


] r rv F ( oomer 






John Sharp 


John H Ostl.-r 


Feb. 


9, 
9, " 
9, " 

10, ISfiS 
ll), " 
10, " 
10, " 

10, " 


Ed C Miller 


Jiarles I). Brusman 
Samuel Chestnut 
E F Wilkins 


Win 11 Bevan- 


(ohn D. Shotlstall 
John M. Stntsmau 


John F. Raper 
rant-is M. LHller 
John L. Watson 


lime 

July 


\] " 


July 


9, 
2.i, 
25, 
25, 

"! 


i.sr.i 


Win. Clark 


\ndre\v J . Flutter 


James Godmaii 




Charles K. Smith 
David McClellan 1 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


lames R. Warren 
Marcus P. Bestow 
\sahel It. Franklin 
Win. M. Este 
Win. B.iMwin 
^amuel II. Hamilton 
fames W. Bnrbridgo 
SVm. M. Young 
Morris Ki-uick 


Nov. 
Dec. 

March 

Vpril 

June 


22 
17, 

2:;, 

20, - " 
20, " 

1, " 

2i>, || 

2.3 , " 


Xov. 

Dec. 

March 
May 

June 

Dec. 


n* 

17 , 

23] 

28, 
1, 
1, 
1, 
3, 
19, 
19, 


T 


Resigned March l >, 1S62. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. [13. 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieut. Dec. 62; resigned Dec. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted, to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


rrauci.s 31. Williams 


Lyman B. Foster 


,uther Timbeilake 
V-nj. W. Shotwell 
Miilip M. Oizan 
Wm. B. Johnson 
John W. Uuly 
W. \. Ho-e 

E. Guy 
vrus 11,11 
Samuel Platt 


\ng. 

Dec. 
Fan! 

Dec. 

Feb. 
Vpril 


11, II 

25, IS . 3 
31 !! 

lL% " 
1, " 


Feb. 
March 

May 


I 1 , 
lt>, 
<> 

6J 
6, 
12, 


, 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed September 20, 1,SC,3. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 




fi, " 


12, " 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 





184 OHIO IN THE WAR. 



TWENTY-SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE TWENTY-SIXTH OHIO was organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, in July, 
1861, and was recruited from the counties of Butler, Ross, Delaware, Guernsey, Maho- 
ning, Champaign, Scioto, and Madison. As soon as the organization was complete the 
regiment was ordered to the Upper Kanawha Valley, where it performed its first service. The 
regiment remained in that valley until the January following, most of the time engaged in severe 
scouting-duty. In the movement by General Rosecrans on Sewell Mountain, the Twenty-Sixth 
claims to have led the advance, and to have brought up the rear on the retreat from that point. 
Although no great battle occurred in which it might have shown its powers, yet, by hardy endur 
ance of fatigue and exposure, and patient forbearance under great privations, its fidelity when 
duty called, and bearing when danger threatened, established for it a superior reputation. 

In January, 1862, Lieutenant-Colonel Eckley was mustered out, to take command of the 
Eightieth Ohio, and William H. Young, of the Seventy-Ninth, previously Professor of Mathe 
matics and Civil Engineering in the Ohio University, was transferred to fill the vacancy. About 
the same time the regiment was transferred from the Department of West Virginia to the Depart 
ment of the Ohio, soon after named the Department of the Cumberland. It was brigaded with 
the Fifteenth, Seventeenth, and Fiftieth Indiana Regiments, under command of Colonel M. S. 
Hascall (soon after made Brigadier), and placed in Brigadier-General Thomas J. Wood s divis 
ion, of which it constituted a part until October, 1863. On the organization of the Army of the 
Cumberland into corps, at Louisville, in September, 1862, the division was assigned to the 
Twenty-First Corps, and so remained until October, 1863, when the Twentieth and Twenty- First 
Corps were consolidated with the Fourth Corps, and the Twenty-Sixth Regiment became a part 
of the Second Brigade (Wagner s), Second Division (then Sheridan s), of the Fourth Corps. 

The regiment formed a part of the column of advance on Nashville, after the capture of 
Fort Donelson, and shared the forced marches, hardships, and privations of General Buell 3 
army in its advance to Pittsburg Landing to relieve General Grant. While at Nashville Gen 
eral Wood, in the particulars of discipline, drill, and police arrangements, as well as personal 
cleanliness, commended, in general orders, the Twenty-Sixth Ohio as a model for the other regi 
ments in his division. In the advance from Shiloh, through the swamps of Northern Mississippi, 
upon Corinth, the Twenty-Sixth occupied the front line, and was among the first to enter the place. 
During the summer of 1862, while the little and ill-supplied army of General Buell was, by forced 
inarches and counter-marches, holding its line of three hundred miles, the Twenty-Sixth bore its 
full share of the burdens and hardships of that fruitless campaign. During much of this time 
Colonel Fyfle was commanding the brigade, leaving the regiment to the command of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Young. About the last of August, 1862, the Twenty-Sixth, under Lieutenant-Colonel 
Young, together with the Seventeenth and Fifty-Eighth Indiana, about fourteen hundred strong, 
all under Colonel Fyfie, had a slight engagement, near McMinnville, Tennessee, with Forrest s 
brigade of cavalry, numbering about fifteen hundred. Colonel Young led the attack, before 
which the Rebels soon gave Avay, leaving in his hands, among other prisoners, General Forrest s 
body-servant, battle-horse, and private carriage. This horse, a splendid blooded gray, was sub 
sequently ridden by Colonel Young at the battle of Perryville, in command of the Fifty-Sixth 
Ohio, and was lost at the battle of Stone River. In the memorable forced marches of Buell and 
Bragg, from the Tennessee to the Ohio, and thence toward Cumberland Gap, in the fall of 1862, 
the Twenty-Sixth Ohio performed its whole duty. For the greater part of this time the regiment 



TWENTY-SIXTH OlilO INFANTRY. 185 

was under the command of Major C. M. Dagcnfeld, Colonel Fyffe commanding the brigade, and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Young the Sixty-Fifth Ohio. 

On the 26th of December, 1802, General Rosecrans commenced his advance from Nashville 
against Murfreesboro . During this engagement the Twenty-Sixth Ohio, under Major Squires, 
supported in part by the Fifty-Eighth Indiana, made a gallant and successful charge, storming 
and driving from a strong position in the village of Lavergne a far larger force of the enemy, 
that for many hours had held the left wing of the army at buy, and seriously impeded the exe 
cution of the movements in progress. Later in the day, Captain Ewing, of this command, with 
his two companies of skirmishers, charged the enemy s retreating rear-guard, drove them from 
and extinguished the fire of a burning bridge, to the great advantage of our advancing columns. 
This gallant deed was thought of sufficient importance to entitle the regiment to especial men 
tion in reports, but the name of a Kentucky regiment "was mentioned by mistake as the one that 
performed this important and gallant service. 

At the battle of Stone River the Twenty-Sixth, under Major Squires, was one of several 
regiments which stood firm against the charge of the Rebels on the 26th, when three-fourths of 
the National forces on the right had given way and were in full flight ; and thougk for many 
hours the heavily-massed columns of the enemy were hurled against it, they still stood their 
ground; and the Twenty-Sixth Ohio formed the apex of that little convex line of battle that all 
Bragg s victorious army could not break or bend. At this time the command lost one-third of 
its strength in killed and wounded. Major Squires was presented with an elegant sword from 
the command, in appreciation of his services in this battle. 

About the 1st of January, 1862, Colonel Young returned to duty, and again took command 
of the regiment, which lie retained until his resignation, in March, 1863. Colonel Fyffe, during 
this time, was in command of the brigade, or " on leave," until December, 1863, when he waa 
honorably discharged on account of disability. He was afterward attached to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps. 

In the advance on Bragg s lines at Tullahoma and Shelbyville the regiment bore a conspic 
uous and honorable part. In the advance on Chattanooga, in December, 1863, the Twenty-Sixth 
led the advance of Crittenden s corps (which first entered the place), Colonel Young leading the 
regiment in skirmish-line over the northern bluff of Lookout Mountain, the subsequent scene of 
Hooker s memorable battle. At Chickamauga the Twenty-Sixth was in the thickest and bloodiest 
of the fight, where it acquitted itself with honor. Its loss in killed and wounded was very severe, 
being nearly three-fifths of the number engaged. Colonel Young s horse and equipments were 
badly cut up by bullets. Captain Ewing (Acting Major) had his horse killed under him, him 
self wounded, and was captured. Captain Ross, Lieutenants Williams, Burbridge and Ruly 
were killed, and Captains Hamilton and Potter, and Lieutenants Platt, Hoge, Morrow, and Shot- 
well wounded. Company H lost all its officers, and twenty-one out of twenty-four men. There 
was no surrender by sound men. 

At the storming of Mission Ridge by the Army of the Cumberland, the Twenty-Sixth Ohio 
maintained its good reputation. It occupied nearly the center of the front line of assault (Wag 
ner s brigade, Sheridan s division), and Avas there called upon to sustain the concentated fire of 
the Rebel circular line of forty cannon and thousands of muskets. The assault was made in the 
face of this terrible fire, and the column worked its way slowly and painfully, yet steadily and 
unfalteringly, up the long and rugged slope of that blazing, smoking, jarring, blood-drenched, 
and death-laden mountain, fighting its way, step by step ; every minute becoming weaker by the 
exhaustive outlay of strength in so prolonged a struggle, and thinner by the murderous fire of 
the foe from above, until, with less than half the command, with the entire color-guard disabled, 
the Colonel, bearing his own colors, spurred his foaming and bleeding horse over the enemy s 
works, and they threw down their arms, abandoned their guns, and gave themselves to precip 
itate flight. In this action the Twenty-Sixth captured about fifty prisoners and two cannon. 
Later in the day the Twenty-Sixth Ohio and Fifteenth Indiana, under command of Colonel 
Young, captured a six-gun battery the enemy were endeavoring to carry off in their retreat, and 



186 OHIO IN THE WAE. 

fljinkcd and dislodged a strong body of the enemy, who, with two heavy guns, were attempting 
to hold in check the National forces until their train could be withdrawn. These guns, also, 
were captured. In token of their appreciation of Colonel Young s gallantry on Lookout Mount 
ain, his command subsequently presented him a magnificent sword and belt. The Twenty-Sixth 
suffered at this time a loss of about one-fourth of its strength in killed and wounded. Ere its 
dead were buried on the mountain side of Mission Ridge, the Twenty-Sixth, now reduced, by 
two years and a half of arduous service, from one thousand to less than two hundred rifles, was 
on its way with the Fourth Corps to raise the siege of Knoxville. This campaign proved to be 
the most severe of any yet experienced. They marched barefoot over frozen ground, and bivou 
acked without shelter, in mid-winter, clad in summer dress, with half rations, on the desolate 
and dreary hillsides of East Tennessee. Yet even then, with elbows out, pants worn half way 
to the knees, socks and shirts gone to threads, hungry, and shivering in the bitter cold of Jan 
uary 1, 1864, the Twenty-Sixth, almost to a man, re-enlisted for three years more. The 
Twenty-Sixth Ohio was the first regiment in the Fourth Corps to re-enlist, and the first to arrive 
home on veteran furlough. 

Returning to the field at the expiration of its furlough, the regiment rejoined the Fourth 
Corps at Bridgeport, Tennessee. 

On the completion of arrangements by General Sherman for his movement on Atlanta, it 
marched Avith its corps and participated in that arduous campaign. It was at Resaca, Kenesaw, 
Peachtree Creek, Jonesboro , and in all the minor engagements of that march, and in each main 
tained its splendid fighting reputation. 

After resting with the army for three weeks at Atlanta, the regiment Avas again called upon 
to seek the enemy. The Rebel General Hood, thinking to circumvent and defeat the plans of 
General Sherman, made his dash at the rear of Atlanta, and marched on Nashville. In the 
well-contested race that ensued the Twenty-Sixth Ohio bore a part, and again had the honor of 
contending, under the gallant Thomas, with the Rebel foe. 

The battle of Franklin was fought, the enemy checked in his swift march, and the National 
forces won the race into Nashville, closely followed, however, by the still sanguine Rebel 
army. A few days of preparation and of rest, varied by sharp skirmishing along the front of 
the works protecting Nashville, and again the two armies contended with each other in a pitched 
battle. It was won by the National forces, the Rebels completely demoralized and put to flight. 
The National army, including the Fourth Corps, pursued the enemy across the Tennessee River, 
and then, glutted with prisoners and with abandoned Rebel stores, fell back on Huntsville and 
Nashville. 

The Texas campaign was resolved upon. Transports were provided, on which a large force 
was embarked and taken down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans, and from thence 
to Texas. The Twenty-Sixth Ohio formed part of that force, and participated in the severe 
march across the country from Port Lavaca to San Antonio, a march which will long be remem 
bered by those who participated in it, from its disagreeable associations of intense heat, burning 
thirst, and the almost unbearable annoyances of mosquitoes, centipedes, and other "inhabitants" 
of that region. 

On the 21st of October, 1865, the regiment was mustered out of the service at Victoria. 
Immediately thereafter it was sent home to Camp Chase, paid off, and discharged. 



TWENTY-SEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



187 



27th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OK RANK 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 




JOHN W FULLEIl 


Aug. 1, ISO 
III no 27, 18(14 
Mav 31, isii. 
Julv 2.), 186 
Nov. 2, 1*,:. 
March 19, 18i,4 
June 27, " 
Nov. 3, " 
.Mav 29, 18(15 
31, " 
July 2", 186 
Nov. 2, 1S6L 
.March 19, 186 
\ov. 3, " 
Jan. 28, 186; 
.May 21 : 


Aug. .1, 1861 
June 27, 1864 
.May 31, 186; 


Promoted May 22, 1864, to Brig. Gen. Vols. 
Resigned September i;>, 1S64. 
On leave of absence at muster out of reg t. 


Do 
Do 
Lt. Ooljnel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 

ft: :::: 

Do 


MKNDALL CHURCHILL 
ISAAC N. G1LKUTH 
HK.NKY G. KKNNKTT 
/. SWIFT SpAUi.niNt; 
MI-:NL>ALI, CHUKCHI LI 
KDWIN NICHOLS 
KUANK LYNCH 
ISAAC N. GIMIUTII 


Nov. 2 18*V 
.March 19, Isil- 
June 27, " 
Nov. 3 " 
.May 29 1*6; 
31 " 
July 2(1 1S61 
Dec. 22 186. 
.March 19 1>H4 
Nov. 3 " 

.May 29 " 


Resigned February 19, 1864. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Resigned September 24, 1864. 
Mustered out as Captain May 15, 1865. 
Promoted to Colonel. 

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
.Mustered out December 31. Is64, as Captain. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Resigned March 12, 1863. 

Resigned. 

Promoted to Surgeon. 
Resinned April 3;). 1864. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 

Appointed Colonel of a colored regiment. 
Resinned .March 4, 1864. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resinned March 14. 1861. 
Resigned .March 26, 1862. 
Promoted to Major November 2, 1862. 
Honoral.lv discharged October 1, IStJl. 
Resinned June 16, 1862. 






Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Do 


M K\i> A 1,1, CHUKUHII.L 
KHWIN NICHOLS 
JAMKS Mono AN 
ISAAC N. GIJ.RUTH 
JAMKS P. SIMPSON 
(. HAS. H. SMITH 
WM. 11. THKAI.I 
JACOB C. DK.NISK 


Aug. 1 18*11 
March 12 l.s(13 
Nov. 1 18-.-I 
Aug. 19 istil 
July 24 186:. 
.Mav 11 ISC,: 
April 1* is;; 


Aug. 9 186! 
-March 30 1863 
Nov. 1 is.il 
Aug. 19 I8.il 
Julv 29 18 :v 
Mav 11 IM ,3 
Am-il 10 1st!.. 
Dec. 6 1861 
Aug. 12 || 

" 9 " 
" 9 " 

lii " 


Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 








JOHN L. CHAPKI 




Nelson L Lnt/ 


July l.s " 
11 " 
Aug. 1 " 

10 " 
14 " 
14 " 

lii " 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


K lwin Nichols 
Win. W. Cnlb.-rt.son 
Milto:i Wells 
Mi-nd.ill Churchill 




Do 


Norman Tucker 


Do. , 
Do 


Frank Lynch 
Wm. >avers 
Win. Feenv 


16 " 
19 " 


Resinned March 31, 1862. 
Mustered out August 1:0, 1864. 


Do 
Do 


J. W. M. BrocK 


March 2.1, 1862 


April 10 1862 


Resigned September 5, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Maior. 
Resigned October 23, 1562. 
Resigned .September 1. 1864. 
Mortally wounded at Kenesavr Mountain. 
Killed at Dallas May 27, IS6I. 
Mustered out December, 1864. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major. 
Died of wounds received at battle of Atlanta. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant. 
Resinned September 30, 1864. 


Do 






21 " 
Dec. 22 " 
1 22 " 
April .x, 1 63 
March 19, 1 \4 
April 13, 
May 9, 
June 27, 
Ang. 1!, 
Sept. 26, 


Do. 


Win. 11. Winters 


M, " 
Nov. 2, " 
)ct. 23, " 
March 5, LSC.3 
19, 1-rt-i 
\pril 13, " 
May 9, " 
Juno 27, " 
Vug. 11, " 
Sept. 26, " 
26, " 


Do. 


Klisha G. Hamilton 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


James H. Bonais 
Isaac N. Gilrnth 
Jani -s P. Simpson 
Zeph. C. Bryan 
Lucius M. Miely 
Wm. L. Watt 
Jonathan Reese 


John M. Weaver 
Ch;is 11 Smith 


Nov. 3\ " 
3, " 
3, " 
3, " 
Jan. 28, 1S*V> 
" 28, " 
" 28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
Nov. 2, 1.8114 
Mav 11, 18*15 
11, " 
31, " 
31, " 


Nov. 3, 
3, 
" 3, 
3, 
Jan. 28, 186.-) 
28, " 
| 28, || 

28 1 " 
My 11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
31, " 
31, " 
Hine 6, " 


Honorably discharged November 27, 1S54. 
Promoted to Major. 
Absent with leave at muster out of regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Declined promotion. 

llesicncd ns Lieutenant April 3, 1SG5. 
designed June 16, 1865. 
Resigned June 3, l.*6.">. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
designed June 20, 186;. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


Do 


Do. 
Do 
Do 
Do !." 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


John 11 Cooper 


Wm 1) Phillips . 


rank B. ILr/.lcton 
l-invs Skelton 


K lwird \ Webb 


I nomas M. Willis 
li. II. Worth 
Demetrius Me. Fan n 
Jhas. Chadwick 
Stephen Allison 
John A. Kvans 
Francis M. \Vashburn 
Daiii-1 W. Jones 


Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


tobert C. Beggadike 
James II. Hedges 


July IS, 18(11 


Vug. 12, 1861 


Promoted to Captain. 


Wm. 31. Vonl son 
Philip B ( loon 


24, " 
" 27 " 


Inly 21, || 


romoted by President to Capt. and A. A. 8. 
lesignod September 3(1, 1861. 
romoted to Captain Juno 6, 1352. 
romoted to Captain. 


Wm H. Winters 


Vug. 1, " 
2, " 


J. W. 31. Brock 




" 7, " 
10, " 
11, " 
| l 14, || 

Dec. 1\ " 
13, " 

Feb. 6, 1862 

M arch 2ti, " 
27, " 
Feb. C, " 


12, " 
16, || 

" 19* " 
Dec. 7, " 
13, " 
\pril 10, 1862 

10, - 

10, " 
May 1 " 


romoted to Cap.tain. 
^romoted to Captain. 
\ilh-d October 4, 1862. 
{e>inned Mav 17, 18*12. 
1 sinned March 27, 18*12. 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 
Resigned April 27, 1862. 
levoked. 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 


Elisha G. Hamilton 
Henrv A. Webb 
Wm. K. Johnson 
G -orge McDonough 
Theodore Sawver 
James H. Boggia 
Albert R. Austin 
Matthew Brown 
Olias. W. Greene 
Isaac N. Gilruth 



188 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



1st Lieutenant 

Eo. 
o. 
Do. 



o. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

2d Lieutenan 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



8S: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do- 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Edward Gibson 

James P. Simpson 

Zeph. C. Bryan 

Jonathan Reese 

Lucius M. Mit-ly 

George. VV". Young 

Win. L. Watt 

David H. Moore 

Orrin B. Gould 

Henry W. Diebolt 

Thomas A. Walker 

Wm. K. Eils 

John M. Weaver 

James F. Day 

Chas. II. Smith 

John II. Cooper 

Marcus I). L. Faverty 

Demetrius Mo Faun 

Elwood B. Temple 

Wm. D. Phillips 

Frank B. Hazleton 

James Skelton 

Edward A. Webb 

L homas M.Willis 

R. 11. Worth 

Uhas. Chadwick 

Stephen Allison 

John A. Evans 

Francis M. Washbnrn 

John F. Woodruff. 

Newton II. Erviu 

John A. Graham 

Jonas S. Stukey 

Daniel W. Jones 

Robert G. Beggadike 

Wm. II. Hamilton 

Orlin J. Baldwin 

Samuel N. Weeks 

Matthew F. Ma-digan 

James Dixon 

Daniel Blai/e 

Albert It. A us ton 

Isaac N. Gilruth 

Matthew Brown 

Uhas. W. Greene 

Theodore! Sawyer 

Lucius M. iHioly 

Edward Gibson 

lames P. Simpson 

Jolin Srol e 

Wm. Wilson 

Zeph. C. Ryan 

Jonathan lleese 

Jlia.-. F. Moore 

Henry W. Diebolt 

lacob C. Cohen 

Gi-o. W. Young 

David H. Moore . 

Win. L. Watt 

Finley C. McGrew 

Thomas A. Walker 

Wm. E. Ells 

John M. Weaver 

Tgc S. Spaulding 

James F. Day 

Ohas. II . Smith 

John II. Cooper 

Marcus D. L. Faverty 

Demetrius Me Faun 

31 wood B. Temple 

\Vm. D. Phillips 

Frank B. Hazleton 

James Sk?lton 

Cdward A. Webb 

i homa.v M. Willis 

R. H. Worth 

Jhas. Chadwick 



DATE OF RANK. 



March 31, 1862 



May 
June 

Oct. 

Nov. 

March 

Jan. 

March 

April 



A us;. 
Sept! 



N T ov. 
Jan. 



May 

June 
July 

AUK. 

Sejat. 

Nov. 



May 

June 
July 



Nov. 

Doc. 

Feb. 

.March 

I Vb. 

March 

May 
June 

July 



6, LSr.2 



Aug. 

Dct. 

Nov. 
March 
Jan. 
April 



1863 



COM. ISSUKD. 



May 



I, 
24, 
24, 
II, 
21, 
--, 
22, 
22, 

2fi 

March 19, 
13, 
13, 
13, 



1862 



JUIK 

July 



Dec. 



March 
June 



April 



May 



June 
Aug. 



Nov. 
Dec. 



May 



June 
luly 



Sept. 
D.-c. 



Juno 

April 
May 

June 



Aug. 



Resigned March 14, 1864. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered out February 5, 1864. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered out December 23, 1864. 

Mustered out. 

Died of wounds received at Dallas May 28, 64. 

Appointed Major of colored regiment. 

Mustered out December 22, 1864. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Killed June 1C,, 1664. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Declined promotion. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Resigned as 2d Lieutenant October 14, 1864. 

Promoted to Captain. 



1861 



Resigned June 3, 1865. 
Promoted to Captain. 



Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered out withTegimont. 

Mustered out as Regimental Quartermaster. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Resigned October 15, K>61. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned June 21. IS62. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned June 25, !8"2. 

Resigned July 16, 1.-62. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned March 19, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned July 24, 18C3. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned July 15, lstt. 

Promoted to Major colored regiment. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned April 1, KsU. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Honorably discharged January 5, 1865. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 



TWENTY-SEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY, 189 



TWENTY-SEVENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THIS regiment was organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, in August, 18G1. The enlisted men 
who composed it were from all parts of the State, and were, to a great extent, stran 
gers to themselves and to their officers. On the morning of the 20th of August, 1861, 
the regiment marched out of camp nine hundred and fifty strong, and took the cars for St. Louis, 
Missouri. On its arrival the regiment encamped near the city, and great efforts were made to 
perfect the men in drill and discipline. Early in September the regiment moved by steamer to 
St. Charles, and thence to Mexico, on the St. Joseph Railroad. Soon after this, orders were 
received to march to the relief of Colonel Mulligan at Lexington. The troops moved rapidly 
across the country ; but, before they could reach the city, the enemy had seized all the boats, and 
so rendered it impossible to cross the river. The command moved up the north bank of the 
Missouri and crossed over to Kansas City. While here the regiment was constantly engaged in 
drilling, and soon became able to maneuver with promptness and precision. In October the 
command marched to join General Fremont, then moving on Springfield; but, upon the arrival 
of General Hunter, thfe regiment was ordered to Scdalia. In December, 1861, the regiment 
shared in the capture of thirteen hundred recruits, who were endeavoring to join the Rebel Gen 
eral Price. In February, 1862, the regiment was ordered to proceed to St. Louis, where it 
arrived, after a severe march, on the 20th. The next morning the regiment moved down the 
river, and landed at Commerce. 

In the organization of the Army of the Mississippi, the Twenty-Seventh was assigned to the 
First Brigade, First Division. In March, the army moved upon New Madrid, the Twenty-Sev 
enth being in the advance. The morning the column neared the town, the regiment drove the 
enemy s skirmishers back to the main line, and then advanced upon this line through a perfect 
storm of shells from the forts and gunboats. When the enemy s position had been well ascer 
tained, the regiment moved back out of the range of the Rebel guns and encamped. On the 
night of March 12th, two companies of the Twenty-Seventh, with a detachment from another 
regiment, drove in the Rebel pickets and protected the force detailed to place the siege-guns in 
position. This was effected without loss, and the next day the regiment moved up in support of 
the battery. The regiment was actively engaged during the remainder of the siege, and, after 
the surrender of the town, remained in camp about two weeks, constantly engaged in drilling. 
It then moved to Island No. 10, and assisted in the capture of that place, and a few weeks later 
moved to the vicinity of Fort Pillow. 

The army being ordered to Pittsburg Landing, arrived at Hamburg (near Pittsburg Land 
ing) about the 1st of May, 1862, and moved on Corinth, forming the left of Halleck s army. 
During the advance, the regiment was frequently engaged in skirmishing, and, during the siege, 
was repeatedly under fire, and in every instance behaved well. The regiment shared in the pur 
suit of the Rebels, but soon returned to the vicinity of Corinth, where the summer months were 
spent quietly in camp. Fuller s brigade, or, as it was frequently called, the Ohio Brigade, to 
which the Twenty-Seventh belonged, had occupied luka, but, about the middle of September, was 
again concentrated at Corinth. Hardly had they reached Corinth when General Price attacked 



190 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

the small force left at luka, and occupied the place. The Ohio Brigade was a part of the force 
sent to recapture the town, which it reached on the 19th of September. The fight began at noon, 
near Barnett s Station, eight miles from luka, and it was after four P. M. before the Rebels were 
forced back to the town. The Ohio Brigade acted as rear-guard on the 19th, and the battle was 
raging furiously when it reached the field. It was immediately formed for action, and moved to 
the front on the double-quick, driving the enemy over the crest of a ridge. Darkness put an end 
to the conflict, and in the morning the enemy was gone. They were followed for ten or twelve 
miles, and then the troops returned to Rienzi. 

In a short time the brigade returned to Corinth, and encamped near the town on the Tus- 
cumbia. The next day (October 3d) the brigade formed in line of battle on the north-east side 
of town, but after nine o clock in the evening it moved to the Chewalla Road, and took position 
on both sides of Battery Robinett, which it sustained during the whole of the next day s fight. 
During the night of the 3d the hostile lines were resting within range of each other, and the skir 
mishers were close together. Before daylight the Rebel guns, two hundred yards distant, opened 
fire with great rapidity. As soon as it was light enough to sight a piece, the guns of Robinett 
and Williams drove the Rebels from their position. Skirmishers were very active for several 
hours, those from the Twenty-Seventh using seventy rounds of ammunition, and losing several 
men. When the right of the National line was forced back to Corinth, Van Dorn made a 
vigorous attack on the Ohio Brigade, and, after a desperate struggle, was repulsed. In this en 
gagement the brigade lost three hundred men, and more than sixty of these belonged to the 
Twenty-Seventh. The regiment joined in the pursuit, and after advancing as far as Ripley, with 
nothing of importance occurring, it returned to Corinth. Here the regiment received two hun 
dred recruits, a very timely re-enforcement, as the Twenty-Seventh was much reduced, some of 
the companies mustering mere squads. 

On the 1st of November the Ohio Brigade marched toward Grand Junction to join Grant s 
army, and with that army it marched as far south as Oxford, Mississippi. When Forrest crossed 
the Tennessee River, in December, the brigade was ordered to Jackson, Tennessee, to assist in 
driving the Rebel raider back. After considerable marching, the brigade encountered Forrest at 
Parker s Cross Roads, and took an active part in the engagement at that place, capturing seven 
guns, three hundred and sixty prisoners, and four hundred horses. In this capture the Twenty- 
Seventh bore an honorable share. The Ohio Brigade followed Forrest to the Tennessee River, 
marching in the middle of winter, over ice one day and in fathomless mud the next, without 
tents, without rubber blankets, without proper food, and without ambulances. When the troops 
readied Corinth one-fifth of the men were bare-footed, and the Surgeon of the Twenty-Seventh 
reported officially that the deaths resulting from that march equaled the losses of a severe skir 
mish. When the brigade arrived at Corinth, it was attached to General Dodge s command ; and 
though the garrison was living on half rations, in view of the hardships the Ohio troops had 
sustained, full supplies were issued to them. Comfortable log huts were built, and quite a rivalry 
sprang up among the regiments as to whose camp should be the finest. That of the Twenty- 
Seventh was laid out with great care and taste, and was remarkably neat and clean. 

The brigade moved eastward with General Dodge, through luka and the Tuscurnbia Valley. 
General Dodge drove the Rebel cavalry from Bear Creek, and followed as far east as Town Creek. 
After returning from Town Creek the Ohio Brigade was ordered to Memphis, and remained some 
time, performing garrison duty. During its stay at Memphis the Twenty-Seventh was engaged 
in several reconnoissances, and one hundred men from the regiment, with detachments from the 
other regiments of the brigade, were engaged in guarding prisoners of war from Vicksburg to 
Johnson s Island, Fort Delaware, and other points. In October, 1863, the brigade left Memphis, 
and moved via Corinth to luka. In the march from luka the Twenty-Seventh was in the advance 
brigade, and moved from eighteen to twenty miles per day, and encamped at night from six to 
ten miles in advance of the main column. Communication was held each night by means of 
rockets. General Dodge finally halted with a large portion of his command at Pulaski, but the 
Ohio Brigade marched about fifteen miles south and occupied Prospect. Here the troops were 



TWENTY- SEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY. 191 

employed in building fortifications and bridges. When these works were about completed the 
Twenty-Seventh re-en listed as veterans and were furloughed to their homes. Shortly after their 
return to the field the Ohio Brigade moved against Decatur and captured it. Fortifications were 
laid out, and the town was soon well intrenched. While at Decatur the Ohio Brigade was dis 
continued, and the Twenty-Seventh and Thirty-Ninth Ohio, Sixty-Fourth Illinois, and Eigh 
teenth Missouri, constituted the First Brigade (Colonel Fuller commanding) of the Fourth 
Division, Sixteenth Army Corps. 

On the 1st of May, 1SG4, the Fourth Division moved from Decatur and joined the main 
army at Chattanooga. When the army approached Resaca, the Twenty-Seventh, with other reg 
iments, was ordered to move upon the railroad north of the town, to damage it as much as pos 
sible, and to endeavor to reach the bridge over the Oostenaula. They, were succeeding well in 
their undertaking when they were recalled and fell back to Snake Creek Gap. At Dallas, 
Georgia, early on the morning of the 27th of May, the pickets were sharply attacked by the 
Rebels, and driven back to within easy musket range of the main body. The brigade formed in 
line, and two companies of the Twenty-Seventh advanced on the double-quick to re-enforce the 
guard. The Rebels were driven back, but Captain Sawyer, commanding the skirmish-line, and 
his First-Lieutenant, Henry W. Diebolt, were mortally wounded ; and these two officers, who 
had served in the same company and eaten at the same table, were laid side by side that evening, 
in the little grave-yard just north of Dallas. The regiment was engaged with Hood s corps on 
the 28th of May, skirmished at Big Shanty in June, and fought at Kenesaw, losing heavily, both 
in officers and men. On the 4th of July, 18C4, che regiment participated in the action at Nic- 
ojack Creek, advancing at the head of the division with fixed bayonets, and charging the Rebel 
works with complete success. 

On the 22d of July, before Atlanta, the regiment was engaged in one of its most severe bat 
tles, and sustained its heaviest loss. It charged the enemy again and again, and at one time, 
when threatened on its flanks, changed front to rear, under fire, formed the new line promptly, 
and again advanced to the charge. Under a clump of pines, two miles south-east of Atlanta, 
near where they fell, rest the heroes of the Twenty-Seventh who were killed upon that field. 
The regiment was with the Sixteenth Corps as it moved to the west side of Atlanta, and partici 
pated in the skirmish of July 27th, driving back the enemy s cavalry. In August the regiment 
was sent to Marietta, where it remained till the fall of Atlanta. From the time it left Chatta 
nooga till Atlanta was in our possession, it had lost sixteen officers and two hundred and one 
men, only six of whom (all enlisted men) were reported "missing." This was a loss of more 
than half the men present for duty when the regiment left Chattanooga. 

The regiment pursued Hood northward, and, after returning, marched with Sherman to the 
sea. skirmishing near Savannah, with slight loss. It shared in the campaign of the Carolinas, 
and at the crossing of the Salkehatchie, South Carolina, the Twenty-Seventh literally hewed its 
way through forest and swamp, with water nearly up to the waist, for more than a mile, and was 
among the first to find a way to cross the river. At Cheraw, South Carolina, the Twenty-Seventh 
was the first regiment to enter the town, skirmishing with the Rebel cavalry, driving them 
through the streets of the town and across the Pedee. Here the regiment captured a fine English 
twenty-pound gun, which bore the following inscription: " Presented to the sovereign State of 
South Carolina, by one of her citizens residing abroad, in commemoration of the 20th of Decem 
ber, I860" (the day South Carolina seceded). At Bentonville, North Carolina, Monroe s divis 
ion, to which the Twenty-Seventh belonged, attacked the enemy s left, and pushed forward so 
vigorously that the skirmish-line was at General Joe Johnston s head-quarters before they were 
aware of it. This was the last time the Twenty-Seventh was under fire. 

After the surrender of Johnston it moved via Richmond to Washington, participated in the 
review, and then proceeded to Louisville. In July, 1865, the regiment was ordered to Camp 
Dennison, and there the members of it received their final payment and discharge. 



192 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



28th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 

Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


AUGUST MOOR 


June 10, 1861 

Nov. 27, 1863 
June 10, 1861 
Sept. 24, 1862 
May 14, 1863 
Aug. 5, " 
March 27, " 
Dec. 14, 1864 
June 10, 1661 

Oct. y, " 

Sept. 24, " 
June 10, " 
Feb. 26, 1863 
June 10, 1861 
Inly 4, 1862 
\pril 28, 1863 
June 21), " 


Oct. 30, 1861 

Jan. 10, 1864 
Oct. 30, 1861 

May i4,"l^63 
Aug. 5, " 
Jan. 10, ls64 
Dec. 14, " 
Oct. 30, 1861 

Vet. 3 6r i8< ; i 

Feb. 26, 1863 
Oct. 30, 1861 
Inly 23, 1,-tf j 
April 28, 1863 
June 29, " 
July 24, " 
Oct. 30, 1861 
3", " 
" 30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
March 20, 1S62 


(Breveted Brigadier-General; mustered out 
I July 23, 1864. 

Resigned September 24, 1862. 
Resigned March 17, 1863. 
Declined. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864 
Declined. 
Not mustered out. 
Resigned October 9, 1864. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Sept. 24, 62. 
Killed at battle of Piedmont. 
Resigned January 21, 1863. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 
Resigned April 16, 1863. 
Resigned February 14, 1853. 
Declined. 
Mustered out Julv 23, 1864. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 
Resigned January 1, 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 
1 ransferred to 1st Lieutenancy. 
Resigned March 24, 1863. 
llesigned July 17, 1862. 
Resigned June 8, 1862. 
Mustered out. 

Resigned March, 1862. 
Resigned July 25, 1862. 
Resigned March 17, 1862. 
Resigned October 1, 1862. 
Declined promotion. 
Resigned March 24, 1863. 
Mustered out July 23, 1804. 
Mustered cc.it. 
Reinstated ; mustered out July 23, 18G4. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 


(30TTFRIED BECJvER.... 
GOTTFKIEB BECKER 
ALEX. BOLENDEB 

ALEX. BOLENDF.R 


GOTTFRIED BECKER 


EUN F.ST SCHACHI 


EDWIN FKKY 


Do 


ALFX BOLENDKR 


Do 


ERNEST SCHACHI 


Do 
Ass t Surgt-on 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 


CHAS. E. DENIG 


jKOKGK P. llACKl.MiKRG 


A. E. JENNEII 




Inly 24, 
Juno 10, " 
13, 1861 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
" 13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
July 27, " 
March 1,1862 


KARL BEYSCHLAG 
Ernest Schachi 
Albert Hitter 


Matthias Reichings 


Do 


V 1 1 10 1 ft 


Do 


Henry JSoimncr 


Do. 


Do 


Bernhard Eitb 
Maurice Wesolowski 
Jeorge Sommer 
Win Ewaid 


Do 
Do. 


Do 


Do 


Charles Drach 


Do 
Do 


Augustus Eix 
Ed \viu Frey 


Fune 3, " 
March 1, " 
July 17, " 
25, " 
Sept. 24, " 


June 24, " 

24, " 
Dec. 31, " 

1: ), " 

15, | 


Do 
Do 


Louis Frey 




DO: ::::.:::: 


Charles Drach 


Do 

Do 


Arnold Jleer 


Marcli 24, " 
" 24, " 
19, 1864 
April 22, " 
22, " 
July 7, 1862 
Nov. IS, 1864 
June 13, 1861 
13, " 


April 8, " 

8, " 
March 19, 1861 
April 22, " 
" 22 " 
Dec. 31 i 1802 
Nov. IS, 1864 
Oct. 30, 1861 
30, " 


Mustered out December 17, 1864. 
Mustered out July 2.3, 1864. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant July 23, 1864. 
3n detached service at muster out of reg t. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned August 27, 1861. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
let Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
1>... 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


\lbert Traub 


Samuel Rosentlnil 
Herman Koenigsherger .... 
Leopold Markbreit 


K Birk 




Win. Ewald 


Augustus Fix 
Matthew Louterbach 
Alex Bolt nder 


12, " 
13, " 
" 13, 
" 13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 
July 15, 
27, 
Sept. 13, 
Oct. 23, 
10, 
" 26, 
Nov. 11, 
.Jan. 21,1862 
March 1, " 
Feb. 14, " 
March 17, " 
April 18, " 
June 3, " 
.March 1, " 
April 6, " 
July 25, " 
Oct. 1, " 
Sept. 24, " 
March 17, " 
Dec. 2i>, " 
31, " 
Feb. 25, 1863 
March 17, " 
24, " 
April 22, 1864 
22, 1863 
22, 1864 

Nov. ]>, " 


" 30, " 
30, " 
" 30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
" 30, " 
" 30, " 
30, " 
Nov. 20, " 
20, " 
" 20, " 
" 20, " 
Jan. 21, 1862 
March 20, " 
20, " 
May 1, " 
Jiino 3, || 

24 " 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned October 21, 18,61. 
Resigned October 21, 1861. 
Resigned December 27, 1861. 
Resigned February 14, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned November 10, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Appointed Captain 108th reg t July 30, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned December 26, 1S62. 
Revoked. 
Resigned April 18, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 

Declined promotion ; mustered out July 23, 04. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned December 31, 1362. 
Resigned March 17, 1862. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 
Reigned April 22, 1863. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 
Mustered out July 23, 18o4. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
M ustered out. 

Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant July 23, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


Ernest Zimmerman 
Edwin Frev 
Chas. Drach 
S. G renewal d 
Philip Wich 
Charles A. Lucius 


Frederick Wiesing 
Anton Grodzicki.. 






Frank Schmidt .. . 


Albert Traub 




Herman Koenigsberger 
Gottlieb Hummel 


rfamu -l Rosenthal 




Louis C. Frintz 
Ferdinand lloizer 





Herman Gut hard 
John Lang 




Dec. 15, 1862 
3!, " 
31, " 
April 8, 1863 
8, " 
8, " 
22, 1864 
Juno 11, 1863 
April 22, 1864 
22, " 
Nov. 18, " 


Louis Weit/"l 
Albert Liomin 
Augustus Grieff 
Michsvl Kle : n i 


.John .J. Scuellenbauu) 
Henry Raabe 
.lohn Rnedeil 
Henry Oker 
Rudolph Gut hens t"in 
Frederick ilagenbuch 



TWENTY-EIGHTH OHIO INFANTRY 



193 



BANK. 


NAME. DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


KEMAUKS. 


1st Lieutenani 
2d Lieuteuaul 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

K: 

K: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

& 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Christian Hildebrand 
Albert Traub 


K,,. 
June 

Sept. 
Oct. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

March 


18, 
13, 

is; 

13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 

i:i; 

13, 

11. 

11, 

ll 
11, 
21, 

1, 


1 *64 


Nov. 
Oct. 

Nov. 


IS, 1804 
30, 1801 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
20, 


Mustered out with regiment, 
romoted to Is Lieutenant. 
romoted to is jieutenant. 
romoted to Is Lieutenant, 
romoted to Is Lieutenant, 
romoted to Is Lieutenant, 
{(signed Octol >r 21), 186*. 
romoted to Is Lieutenant, 
romoted to Is jieutenant. 
romoted to Is lieutenant, 
romoted to is jieutenant. 
romoted to Is jieutenant. 


Carlo Peipho 




John Amroin 


Martin ilo.isci 
Emil Wilde 


Frank Schmidt 


Anton Grod/irki 


Herman Koeiiigsberger 
Leopold Markbroit.... 
Samu -l Kosenthal 
Louis C. Frintz 
Charles Miller 
Lucas Sehwank 
John Lang 
Ferdinand llol/.er 
lOttlieb Hummel 
Herman Guthard 
Augustus Grieff 


1862 


Jan. 
May 


20, 

20, 
20, 

20, 
20, 
20, 
21, 
1, 


1862 


romoted to Is jieutenant. 
lesigned April >, LS02. 
it-signed Marc 17, 1862. 
romoted to Is Lieutenant. 
romoted to Is Lieutenant, 
romoted to Is Lieutenant, 
romoted to Is Lieutenant, 
{evoked, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
U-signod September 25, 1805. 
{(signed July 30 1865. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
)ied February 6, 1863. 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant, 
romoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned February 21, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Joseph Ne whacker 
Edward Otte 

Michael Klein 


April 

June 
Aug. 
April 
Job- 
March 
Sept. 


i;. 



2! 

1 i, 

25, 

17, 
?,4 





June 

Sept. 
Dec. 


1, 
1, 
3, 
6, 

10, 
15, 


1862 


James G. Worthington 
John Roedell 
Albert Liomin 


August llerm;;n 
Louis Weitxell 
Henry Raabe 


Dec. 


15, 
15, 


John J. Schellenbaum 


July 
Oct. 
Dec. 
April 
Feb. 
March 

April 
Nov. 


30, 

1, 
26, 
22 
21, 
2, 
24, 
17, 
24, 
-||. 

22! 
22, 
18, 


1864 
1863 

1864 


April 

Nov. 


8l! 

22, 
8, 
8, 
8, 
8, 
8, 
2(i, 

22\ 

22, 
18, 
18, 
15, 


1864 

1 M ,3 

1864 


Resigned March 2, 1803. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out July 23, 1864. 
Resigned March 11, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out April 28, 1864. 
Mustered out April 28, 1864. 
Mustered out J ilv 23, 1804. 
Killed at battle of Piedmont. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 


:ludolph_ Guthenstein 


iVm. Althammer 
lohn Eppinger 
Jacob Mork 


Michael Schmitthemer 


Charles WoHfer 
< redorick Kuhlmau 
Jacob Zeeb 


Frank Birk 


"rederiek Eberhardt 
John 11 user 




Dec. 
June 


! >, 
I-, 


18<33 


Dec. 


ieorgo Benzing 



VOL. 1113. 



194 OHIO IN THE WAR. 



TWENTY-EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



TFIHE TWENTY- EIGHTH OHIO was accepted by the President direct, through 
the exertion of Hon. John A. Gurley, on the 10th of June, 1861. Owing to the 
M absence of the proper officer, the muster-in was delayed until the 6th of July, when 
the regiment went to Carnp Dennison. 

The regiment, thoroughly organized, equipped, and drilled, moved to Point Pleasant, Vir 
ginia, July 31st, and to Parkersburg August 10th. Here Colonel Moor was ordered by General 
Rosecrans to scout the counties of Jackson and Roane, with four hundred picked men, which 
resulted in relieving the town of Spencer, the Rebels having besieged the home-guards, who had 
barricaded and fortified the court-house. The remainder of the regiment marched to Clarksburg, 
and was ordered to Buckhannon on the 16th. Colonel Moor, after accomplishing his mission, 
arrived at Buckhannon August 23d, and the regiment, as a part of General Rosecrans s army, 
marched to Bulltown on the 27th, to Sutton September 1st, and started for Summerville on the 
7th. At noon on the 10th the Rebels, under Floyd, were found intrenched near Carnifex Ferry, 
the attack on which commenced in the afternoon and lasted until night-fall. During the night 
Floyd retreated. The Twenty-Eighth lost three killed and twenty-seven wounded. 

On the 14th the regiment crossed Gauley River and marched to Camp Lookout, and, on 
September 25th, marched to Big Sewell Mountain ; remained opposite the fortified position of 
the Rebels (Lee commanding) until the 6th of October, when, at ten o clock at night, the retreat 
commenced over horrid roads. The troops arrived at Camp Anderson (on New River) on the 
9th, crossed New River to Fayetteville on the 19th, and returned the same night after some skir 
mishing. On the 21st the pickets on New River were attacked. Two companies of the regi 
ment, directed to re-enforce the pickets, soon repulsed the Rebels. Company C had one killed 
and one wounded. On December 6th Camp Anderson was evacuated, and the troops marched to 
Gauley. The regiment was drilled and instructed thoroughly, and May 2, 1862, was marched to 
Fayetteville, where General Cox assumed command, and formed the Kanawha Division into 
four brigades. The Twenty-Eighth, Thirty-Fourth, Thirty-Seventh Regiments, and Simmond s 
Battery, of Ohio troops, constituting the Second Brigade, Colonel Moor commanding, moved on 
the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad May 10th, by way of Raleigh, Flat Top Mountain, and 
F > rinceton, arriving at French Mill May 14th. 

Two companies of the Twenty-Eighth were sent across East River Mountain to reconnoiter, 
and fell in with a Rebel force at Wolf Creek with commissary stores. Killed three and captured 
vight prisoners, a number of arms and horses, and burned the wagons and stores. 

May 15th Colonel Moor sent five companies of the Twenty-Eighth, four companies of the 
Thirty-Seventh, and two companies of the Thirty-Fourth Regiments, under command of Lieu- 
u-nant-Colonel Blessing, up the East River and Wytheville Road, to ascertain the Rebel force 
t Rocky Gap, with orders to return next day. About nine P. M. General Cox and stair 
arrived at French Mill, having been attacked and driven from Princeton that afternoon, his 
force scattering in the woods. Colonel Moor marched with his brigade for Princeton forthwith ; 
the companies under Lieutenant-Colonel Blessing were notified by courier to march direct on 
Princeton by the Wytheville road and join the brigade in the morning. The brigade arrived 
.-it Princeton at six A. M., much fatigued, the enemy having evacuated after burning commissary 



TWENTY-EIGHTH OHIO INFANTRY. 195 

and quartermaster s stores, and leaving a picket for observation, which retired as our skirmishers 
became visible. 

Learning from our wounded that the Rebels, under General Marshal, were in position one 
mile west of town, Colonel Moor, with five companies and one Parrott gun, took possession of the 
cemetery. General Cox, with the rest of the brigade, remained in town, waiting for the First 
Brigade, under Colonel Scammon, which was falling back also from the Narrows of New River. 
An artillery duel and some skirmishing ensued, in which the Rebels wasted much ammunition. 
At ten o clock A. M. heavy musketry firing was heard, distant about one and a half miles, on 
the heights of the Wytheville road, the first sign of the detachment ordered to move to Princeton 
by the Wytheville road. Five companies were ordered to advance to their support, which order, 
however, was not complied with, and Lieutenant-Colonel Blessing was forced back with a loss 
of eighteen dead and fifty-six wounded the Twenty-Eighth having six dead and eleven wounded. 
In the afternoon the First Brigade arrived, and, during the night, General Cox concluded to fall 
back on Flat Top Mountain. 

At three o clock A.M. the retrogade movement commenced. At noon, the ten companies 
under Blessing, driven back the day before, fell in with our column near Blue Stone River, hav 
ing marched all night by a circuitous route through Black Oak Mountains. The division reached 
Flat Top without molestation, May 19th. 

Up to the 14th of August, companies A, C, D, E, and F had skirmishes on divers expedi 
tions, losing but few men. Receiving orders to proceed to Washington City, the division left 
Flat Top Mountain August loth, for the Kanawha and Ohio River via Parkersburg, and arrived 
at Washington August 25th ; marched to Fort Albany the 26th ; to Fort Buffalo on the 28th. 
The regiment skirmished with Stuart s cavalry at Falls Church, September 4th. 

General McClellan assuming command of the army, the division was attached to the Ninth 
Corps, under General Reno. Coming up with the Rebels near Frederick City, Maryland, Sep 
tember 13th, Colonel Moor, with the cavalry attached to his brigade, was ordered to force an 
entrance and drive the Rebels out of the town, which was accomplished after a sharp contest. 

On the 14th the battle of South Mountain was fought, and the Kanawha Division bore the 
brunt of the battle. At Antietam the Twenty-Eighth was the first regiment which forded the 
creek above the stone bridge, and remained in front of the Ninth Corps in skirmish-line all night. 
It lost forty-two killed and wounded. On the 8th of October marched with the division to Clear 
Springs, and, on the 9th, to Hancock, watching Stuart s cavalry, which had recrossed the Potomac. 
The division was ordered to march for the Kanawha on the 14th. The Twenty-Eighth Regi 
ment, after a tedious march, arrived at Brownstown on the 17th of November. During 
December expeditions were sent through Wyoming and Logan Counties, capturing many 
prisoners and horses. 

January 8, 18C3, the regiment was ordered to Buckhannon. April 28th, General Roberts 
having assumed command of the troops in the District of Western Virginia, the regiment fell 
back under him to Clarksburg, before the Rebel General Jones, and advanced on Weston again, 
May 9th. The command marched to Maryland, opposite New Creek, June 16th. Meanwhile 
Western Virginia was threatened with another invasion, and the regiment was ordered to 
march to Beverly, and arrived on the 7th of July. After many marches and skirmishes in 
the mountains, General Averell arrived with a brigade of cavalry, and, on the 1st of November, 
the whole force moved south, across Cheat Mountain, through Pocahontas into Greenbrier. On 
the 5th the. advance came in contact with the enemy at Millpoint, who made a hasty retreat to 
Droop Mountain. On the 6th the infantry forces were ordered to flank and attack the enemy, 
under General Echols, if possible, in the rear, which was done, and the Rebels routed, stating 
their loss in killed, wounded, and captured, at eight hundred. 

On the 7th our forces marched to Lewisburgh, picking up prisoners, cannon, and other aban 
doned property. On the 8th Colonel Moor, in charge of the prisoners, captured some arms and 
four hundred cattle, and was ordered with the infantry and Keeper s battery to return to Beverly; 
General Averill with the cavalry taking another road. The force reached Beverly on the 12th, 



196 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

marching and bivouacking in snow and ice. On the 8th of December the regiment, with a column 
under Colonel Moor, in co-operation with General Averill s great raid to Salem, advanced again 
to threaten Lewisburg, diverting the attention of the Kebels and remaining near Falling Springs 
until General Averill passed the enemy s rear. On the loth the regiment marched to Elk 
Mountain, and found the pass blockaded with rocks and heavy timbers for two miles. At early 
dawn on the loth a detail of men was sent up the mountain to remove the blockade, which 
was accomplished, and at ten o clock the march was resumed and Beverly reached on the 17th, 
with little annoyance from bushwackers. April 25th, 1864, the regiment was ordered to join the 
army of the Shenandoah, collecting under General Sigel at Bunker Hill, where it arrived on the 
29th. May llth Colonel Moor with a force of some two thousand five hundred men, of all arms, 
was sent to Rude s Hill, near New Market, to feel the enemy; the army under General Sigel 
was to follow at four the next morning. Moor s advance was attacked near Rude s Hill at three 
P. M.; a running fight ensued ; at New Market, artillery came into play. Prisoners stated that 
Imboden was there in force. Toward evening Imboden was driven out and New Market was in 
our possession Colonel Moor occupying Imboden s camp. The night being very dark and cloudy 
the enemy made two attacks to regain their first position, but were repulsed handsomely. Early 
next morning, learning from scouts and other sources that Imboden had joined Breckinridge five 
miles south of New Market, Colonel Moor made some alterations in his position and was again 
attacked. After seven A. M., Generals Stahl and Sigel arrived on the field with a cavalry division ; 
other positions were taken, and the battle of New Market was fought amidst heavy thunder 
storms. Our army was forced back to Cedar Creek, which was reached on the 17th of May. 

On the 26th advanced again on Woodstock, New Market, Harrisburg, and Port Republic. 
June 5th came up on the Rebels under General Jones near Piedmont, who occupied a strongly 
intrenched position. Colonel Moor s brigade was ordered to attack, and after a stubborn contest 
drove the Rebels into their works. At about noon it again was ordered to storm the works. The 
assault, made in gallant style, was received with so tremendous a fire that it forced four regiments, 
after losing heavily, to fall back ; the Twenty-Eighth remained on the ground and was ordered 
to lie down and prevent the enemy from making a counter-charge. The regiment kept the Rebels 
at bay for three-quarters of an hour, when it was recalled and resumed its place in the new line 
of battle; being highly complimented by General Hunter. Soon after the third charge was 
made with complete success. One thousand three hundred prisoners were captured and about 
the same number were killed and wounded. Among the killed was General Jones. The Twenty- 
Eighth lost thirty-three killed and one hundred and five wounded out of four hundred and 
eighty-four combatants; two color-bearers were killed and three wounded in quick succession, 
and the regimental flag was perforated by seventy-two balls and pieces of shell. 

On the 6th of June the regiment entered Staunton, and on the 7th made a feint toward 
Lynchburg, destroying miles of railroad and bridges. Subsistence being scarce, and the forces of 
Generals Averill and Crook forming a junction with our army, Colonel Moor was ordered, with 
the Twenty-Eighth Ohio and portions of other regiments, one thousand Rebel prisoners, one hun 
dred and fifty wounded, and hundreds of refugees and contrabands, to march directly across the 
mountains for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, a distance of one hundred and forty-seven miles. 

After a very exhausting march the regiment arrived at "Webster on the 18th, and was ordered 
to Camp Morton, Indiana, with the prisoners, where it arrived safely, and was reviewed on the 
23d of June by Governor Morton and General Carrington. The term of service expiring in 
July, the regiment was ordered to Cincinnati, where it received a cordial welcome, and was 
honorably discharged on the 23d of July, 1864. 

The regiment lost while in the field, two officers killed, seven wounded ; ninety men killed, 
one hundred and sixty-two wounded, and one hundred and seventy-three disabled by disease; 
making a total of four hundred and thirty-four. 



TWENTY-NINTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



197 



29th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATK OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 

is isii;; 
12; l8i).-> 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 

Do 
Lt Colonel 


LOUIS P. BUCKLEY.... 
WM. T. FlTC.il 

JONAS SCHOONOVER.... 
THOMVS CI.\UK 


July 

Nov 


27, 
26, 
12, 


1861 
1 86 1 


jiiiio" 
July 


llesigned January 26, 1863. 
Honorably discharged October 13, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned June 19, 1863. 
Discharged November 4, 1864. 
Deceased from gun-shot wound. 






June 
Jan. 

July 
Dec. 


19, 


1865 


Oct. 
Jan. 


i! 


!si; : ! 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Mnjoi- 

DO! !!"!"""; 

I!!!: :::::::::::: 
g i"> 


MYUON T. WRKJHT 


EVKIISOX J. lIULitUllT 


12, 


1861 


July 


I:-. 





Mustered out as Major. 
Resigned December ! -> 186 


WM. T. FITCH 

10 H WAR i) llAVKS 


Jan. 

April 
July 


12, 
26, 
5, 
18, 

1", 


18tl2 
1 s6 1 


June 
Jan. 

April 
July 


28 

18, 

is] 

10, 
12, 




Promoted to Colonel. 
Promoted to Lientenant-Colonol. 


JONAS SCHOONOVKU 
EVKKSON J. Hui.m UT 
EDWIN B. WOODBURY 


1M15 


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out. with regiment as Captain. 
Resigned \u fr ust 1 18(14 


ii (l 

Ass t Surgeon 


EDWARD P. HAINKS 
THOMAS B. MISI:I: 


July 
Oct 


21 
5, 
3 


1-61 

1861 


Aug. 21), 1862 
J uly f), 186.") 


Mustered out with regiment. 
.Mustered out with regiment. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 


Cvut;s HOSAOK 


Aug. 
Ian. 
A ng. 
Sept.. 


"I 
26, 
24, 

1", 


IS," 

ISil l 
1-61 


Aug. 
Feb. 
Aug. 
Dec. 


12, 


1 sil 
ls- . t 

1861 


Resigned August 7, 1863. 
romoted to Surgeon, 
romoted to Surgeon. 
Designed August 4, 1862. 


THOMAS B. MISI-K 

U. II. IIUUII UT 


Win T Fitch 




iV 










Promoted to Major. 
Discharged September 9, 1864. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned March 1."., 1862. 


Do 


Wilber F. Stevens 

K.lw.,1-,1 Mnvi.u 


Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 


26^ 

10, 

2S\ 

30, 
15, 
12 


18(13 
1864 






Do I Puiaski C. Hard 




Do 
Do 
Do 


John I 1 Morse 




Resigned April 13, 1862. 


John S CleinincT 




1)0 




Marc i 

May 

Dec. 

June 
Feb. 
May 


13 
1 
1 

2* 
18 

23 


1864 


Promoted to Major. 
Promoted ; resigned May 13, 1863. 
Resigned April I."., 1862. 
Honorablv discharged October 1, 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned August 29, 1864. 
Resigned February 3, 1862; re-instated. 
It. -signed. 
Hi-signed May 22, 1863. 
romoted to Major. 
Discharged October 30, 1864. 
Declined promotion. 
Declined promotion. 
Killed June 16, 1864. 
Declined. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mu.-tered out with regiment. 
Declined promotion. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
.Mustered out with regiment. 
. Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Resigned February 6, 1862. 
Resigned February 11, 1803. 
Resigned April 13, Isti2. 
Reigned June 20, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned January 26, 1863. 
Resigned January 24, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Do 
Do 

Do 


Russell B. Smith 


Alden P. Steele 


Dec. 
March 
April 

June 

Oct. 
Dec 


18, 
21, 
13. 
13, 
13, 
9, 
1, 
12 


losiah J Wright 


Do 
1),, 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Mvron T. Wright 
David E. Hulburt 
Elea/.or Burridge 
hbeii y/ r 1>_ Howard 


Do 


Everson J Hulburt 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Rowland 11. Baldwin 
Andrew J. Fulkerson 


Feb. 

May 


3, 


O.-car F. Gibbs 
George W. Dice 


Do 
Do 


Edwin B. Woodbuiv 
Chas. W. Kellogg 


Oct. 


:. , 
1 , 


" 


Oct. 


12 , 


1865 


Do 
Do 
Do 

Do. 


C. H. Russell 
Thomas W. Nasii 
Wilbur F. Chamberlm 
Silas G. Elliott 
L.man 11. Me Adams 
Win. H. Wright 
Rollin L Jones 


Ian. 

\pril 
luly 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Dec. 
Feb. 

March 

April 


1 , 

1 , 

1 , 

e , 

28^ 
28, 
1 , 
12. 
11. 
19, 
19, 
26, 

Ifi 
28, 
28, 
30, 
15, 
21, 
22, 
28, 
13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 


1865 
181 1 

ISt 2 


Jan. 

April 
July 


I-, 
12, 
12, 

o , 

6, 
6, 
2S, 
28, 
10, 
12, 


IK 
Do 
Do 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
M Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
DC. 


Aimer 1$. Paine 
UlvssesS. lloxter 
David W. Thomas 
i ho in as Folger 
Leveret I Grover 
Alfred Bishop 
G. T. ChaHer 
Meujamin F. Perry 
Myron T. Wright 
Theodore C. Winship 


David E. Hnlbutt 


Andrew J. Fulkerson 
< Near F Gibhs 








Discharged August 15, 1864. 
Deeli ned promotion. 
Resigned March 13, 1863. 
Resigned April 13, 1862. 
Rest-tied April 30, 1802. 
Revoked ; discharged October 30, 1,864 
Resigned January 26, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 






A. A. Philbrick 


Feb. " 
April 

May 


28 i 

1", 
10, 

l\ 


I.N12 


Win. S. Crowell 
Si-tli E Wilson 


Andrew Wilson 


William Neil 
Everson J. Hulburt 


Andrew Wilson 


June 

Oct. 

Dec. 

May 
Juue 


30, 
20, 
1, 
12, 
I, 
26, 


1363 


June 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
June 
Fob. 


." . 

28, 

is, 
18, 


1863 


Di.-charged November 1, 1864. 
Honorably discharged December 12, 1864. 
Resigned as 2d Lieutenant March U, IHU 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed May 8, 1864 
Promoted to CapUifl 


Frank P. Stewart 
Benj. N. Smith 
Edwin B. Woodburv 
Winthrop H. Grant 
Chan. W. Kellogg...-, 



198 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATK 


IF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


lut Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do! 
?d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

8S: 
S: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 








1863 

1 MV| 

1863 
1861 


Feb. 
Juno 
May 

June 
July 
Jan. 

May- 
July 


IS, 1863 
10, 
25, 
25, 18(54 
25, 
25, 
25, 
25, 
25, 
25, 
27, 
25, 
6, 1.V55 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
fi ! 

6, 
ti, 
6, 

31 ! 

31, 
12, 


Honorably discharged November 30, 1364. 
Honorably discharged November 30, 1864. 
Killed July 3, 18<53.~ 
Honorably discharged as 2d Lieutenant. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Detached at own request. 
Hon. discharged as 2d Lieut. July 5, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed May 8, 184. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captnin. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out witli regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Honorably discharged June 14, 1864. 


Gary H Ru-s"ll 


Feb. 
May 

June 
July 
Jan. 

May 

July 
Aug. 


24, 
11, 

25*, 

25, 
25, 
25, 
25, 
25, 

2o , 
6, 

fi ! 

C), 
t>, 
6, 
t>, 
(>, 
ti, 
6, 
31, 
31, 
31, 
12, 
14, 
19, 
2(5, 
1(1 




James II. Grinnell 


E T Curtis 


Gurley C. Crane 


Wilbur F. Chamberlm 
Silas G Elliott 


Wintlirop II Grant 


Joel E. Tanner 


Aimer B. Paine 


Ulysses S. Hoxter 


Addi.son J. Andrews 
Stephen Kissinger 
Thadeus E. Hoyt 


Benj. F. Marnier bach 
David W. Thomas 


Giles R. Leonard 
George McNutt 
Marcus F. Roberts 
Jacob Buck 


Wm S Crowell 


Andrew Wilson 


Sept. 


James H. Grinnell 






Ebenezer B. Howard 


Oct. 

Nov. 
Dec. 
Feb. 

May 
April 


16, 

28, 
30, 
3, 
14, 
26, 
21, 
2S, 
28, 
13, 
13, 


1862 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
: Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Josiah J. Wright 

Henry Mack . 






Resigned May 2, 1862. 
Hi-signed February (5, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed March 23, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant April 13, 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned October 25, 18(52. 


1862, 


Wm J Hall 






Wm Veil 




Wm P William-son 




Everson J. Hulburt 
Seth E. Wilson 


Feb. 

April 
May 


28, 1862 
28, 
10. 
1, 


Edwin B Woodbury 


Martin D. Norris 


James B. Storer 
Carv II Ilussell 


July 
June 
Sept. 

May 

Oct. 

Dec. 
Oct. 
Jan. 

May 


13, 
13, 

29, 
30, 
8, 
4, 
1, 
27 
27, 

12^ 
25, 
2(1, 
26, 
24, 
1, 


1863 


Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Tan. 
Feb. 

June 


1, 
1, 

.* 

i, 
i, 

29, 
29, 

IS, 
30, 
28, 18 3 
28, 
18, 
18, 

S 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned October 27, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned October 27, 1862. 
Resigned October 27, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Discharged October 1, 18(53. 
Killed July3, 1863. 
Died September 25, 1S63. 
Honorably discharged July .5, 1864. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Wm B Quirk 


Chas W Kello -" 


JMin J Hovt 


Wm. Nelson 


Benj N Smitli 


Thomas W. Nash 
E. T. Curtis 


Theodore L. Gould 
J. G Marsh 


Henry N. Ryder 
Gurley C. Crane 
Winthrop H. Grant 
Wilbur F. Chamberlin 
Silas G Elliott . 





TWENTY-NINTH OlIIO INFANTRY. 



TWENTY-NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE TWENTY-NINTH OHIO was organized at Camp Giddings, near Jefferson, 
Ashtabula County, August 26, 1861, and was one among the first to answer the call of the 
President for the three years service. Delays and difficulties that could not be surmounted 
kept it in camp until the 25th of December, 1861, when orders were received to march into 
Ashtabula, where cars were ready to transport the regiment to Camp Chase, Columbus. 

In camp the regiment remained until the 17th of January, 1862, when it was ordered to 
Cumberland, Maryland, via the Central Ohio and Baltimore and Ohio Railroads. It remained at 
Cumberland until the fall of 1863. While there it was brigaded with the Fifth, Seventh, and 
Sixty-Sixth Ohio, and the One Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania Regiments, commanded by 
Colonel E. B. Tyler, of the Seventh Ohio. The division was commanded by General Lander until 
his decease, about the 1st of March, 1862, when he was succeeded by General James Shields. 

We have not been successful in procuring, in detail, the facts making up the full history ol 
this regiment, its marches, scouts, privations, and sufferings, but can truthfully say, in general 
terms, that no regiment from Ohio surpassed it in numerous actions and soldierly bearing. 

The regiment participated with the Army of the Potomac, in the battles of Winchester, 
Virginia, March 23, 1862; Port Republic, June 9, 1862; Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862; the 
second Bull Run; Chancellorsville, May 1, 2, and 3, 1863. It was sent to New York City, to 
aid in enforcing the draft, arriving there on the 1st of September, and leaving on the 8th. 1 1 
again joined the Potomac army, on the Rapidan River, Virginia; and, with it, on the 25th of 
September, was transported via Washington to Columbus, Indianapolis, and Louisville, to Chat 
tanooga, Tennessee; and with General Joe Hooker, as its corps commander, engaged in the battle 
of Lookout Mountain, November 24th and 25th, 1863. 

In the spring of 1864, (May 4th), the regiment joined the Atlanta campaign at Bridgeport, 
Alabama, and, under Major-General W. T. Sherman, participated in the battles of Dug Gap. 
Georgia, May 8, 1864; Resaca, May 18th and 19th; Dallas, May 25th; Pine Knob, June loth; 
KenesaAV Mountain, June 27th ; Peach Tree Creek, July 20th, and the siege of Atlanta. 

The Twenty-Ninth left Atlanta on the 15th of November, and, with the army, marched 
through Georgia, and arrived within three miles and a half of Savannah on the evening of 
December 10th. In eleven days thereafter the city of Savannah was occupied by the National 
troops, December 21, 1864. The regiment remained in Savannah until January 27, 1865, when 
it accompanied the army through South and North Carolina to Goldsboro via Columbia, WinB- 
boro , Cheraw, and Fayetteville, arriving at Goldsboro on the 24th of March. It remained in 
Goldsboro until the 10th of April, and then marched to Raleigh, North Carolina, arriving there 
on the 14th. Thence, on the 29th of April, it started for Washington City via Richmond, Vir 
ginia, and arrived near Alexandria, Virginia, May 17th. 

On the 25th the regiment left camp, passed over to Washington, and participated in the 
grand review. Its next camp was near Bladensburg, Maryland. It remained there until the 
10th of June, when it marched into Washington and took the cars for Parkersburg, Virginia; 
and, on its arrival, was met by transports, and conveyed down the Ohio to Louisville, and 
went into camp until the 13th of July, when it started for Cleveland via Cincinnati, Columbus, 
etc. On its arrival at Camp Taylor the men were paid off and discharged, July 22 and 23, 1865. 



200 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



30th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSfED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 
Do 


JOHN GROESBECK.... 

HI;GM EWING 

THEODORE JONES 
THF.ODORF. JONES 
(GEORGE H. HII.DT 
E. W MI-I.-VCTIKK 


July 
\ng. 
Nov. 

Aug. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Feb. 

Nov. 
Sept. 
Nuv. 
May 
Aug. 
Nov. 
Aug. 
July 
Aug. 
July 


24, 
15, 

l".\ 
2, 

2. 
31 

2! 
2( 

9 
31 

4 

21 


1861 

1862 

l-< 1 
18i i2 

1861 
1 <I52 

18 -3 
1861 

1861 

18!>3 


July 

Aug. 
April 
Aug. 
April 
Jan. 

Feb. 
Aug. 
Jan. 
April 

Nov. 
May 

Nov. 
Jnlv 
Aug. 
.Inly 


26, 1861 

"it! lsi 3 
6, 1865 
23, " 
5, 1861 
28, 1862 

2(V. IM ,4 
Si li 
31, 1865 
28, 1861 
8, 1862 
15, 1861 
23, 1862 
12, " 
20, 1863 


Transferred to 39th regiment. 
Appointed Brig. Gen. Nov. 29, 62, by Pres t. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Resigned September 20, 1864. 
Declined to accept ; mustered out as Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Appointed Colonel 54th regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned September 20, 1863. 
Resigned September 22, 1864. 
Resigned. 
Mustered out as Captain. 
Resigned November 12, 1861. [given 
Acting Med. Director 15th A. C.; no discharge 

Declined. 
Resigned April 6, 1S63. 

Never reported ; dropped from roll Feb.28, 62. 
Resigned March 17, 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Major. 
Discharged March 18, 1862. 
Discharged October 2. 1862. 
Promoted to Major 40th regiment. 
Promoted to Major. 


Lt. Colonel .... 
Do 
Do 


Do EMERSON i . BROOKS 
Major JOHN Frr.r.rsov 


Do 




Do 
Do 

Do 


D. CI;XXINGH.Y:M 
CHAS. TOWXSEND 


Do 


CYRUS A. EARNST 
HENRY F. GKII.K 

JOSIAH B. I OTTEK 

C. B. RICHARDS 
D. B. WREN 
PHILANDER F. BKVKRLY .... 
0. FISHI.R 


Surgeon 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


Win. W. Reillv 




10 
K 
11 
21 







28, " 


D. Cunningham 
C. Townseiul 
John W Fowler . 


;; 


" 




Do 
Do. 


Elijah Warner 
C J Gilbbeant 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Win. H. Harlan 
Jacob E. Taylor 
George 11. Ilildt 


|| 


- - , 
24, 


Do. 


John II Groce 


N o v . 
Ian. 
.March 

I nne 
>ct. 
Inlv 
April 
Inly 
May 
\pril 
Feb. 
Inly 

Nov. 


19*, 
28, 
17, 

9, 
22, 
23, 
29, 
25, 

6* 

6, 


1862 
1863 
1864 


Nov. 
Jan. 
May 

Aug. 

Inly 
Mav 
Aug. 

Feb. 
July 

Nov. 
Ian. 


20, " 
28, 1862 
1, || 

12, " 
30, " 
10, 1863 
6, " 

25 , | 
21)1 1864 

25 1 " 
3, " 
3, " 
3, " 
6, 1865 
6, " 
Ij, " 


Killed December 13, 1864. 
Resigned June 28, 1862. 
Killed May 22, 18/13. 
Honorably discharged January 31, 1863. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Appointed A. A. G. April 23, 1863, by Prea t. 
Mustered out. 
Killed. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Lieuteuant-Colonol. 
Des-eited. 
Declined. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant Dec. 20, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Discharged July 2s, 1865. 
Mustered out. with regiment, 
Mustered out with regiment. 
.Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Transferred to 42d regiment. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned September 27, 1862. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


lohn C. Lewis 
Thomas Hayes 


Emory W. Muencher 
Gordan Lotland 


Do 
Do 
Do. 


E. R. Patterson 
Aaron B. Chamberlain 


Do 
Do. 


Cyrus A. Earnst 

Emerson P. Brooks 
George E. O Neal 
E/.ra McConnell 
Win. S. Hatch"r 
Wm.B. Todd 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Do. 
Do 


James I). B.iin 


Ian. 


Do 
Do 
Do 


Isaac N. Thomas 
Joseph Dickerson 


Do. 
Do 
Do 
Do 

1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

ft 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

38: 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 




May 


28, 
111 


I! 


May 


j- ;i <( 


Cyrus W. Delauey 

James W. Mcllruvy 


111 " 


Thomas Hayes 


Aug. 


H, 

1 1, 


I8fi] 


Aug. 


28, 1861 
28, " 


lohn Brown 


Emory W. Muencher 
lames Taylor 


Nov. 
Jan. 

March 

June 
Jan. 

<>;;. 

Jan. 


15, 
20, 

22l 

22 

23! 

24, 

SO*, 
19, 
28, 
28, 
17, 
18, 
13, 
28, 
1", 
17, 
27, 

n 


f 

1863 


Nov. 
Jan. 

May 
Aug. 
D.-C. 

May 


28 1 " 


E. R. Patterson 

George E O Neal 


29, " 
2*, " 
28, " 
30, " 
20, " 
28, 1862 
28, " 
1, " 
1, " 
12, 
12, " 
30, 
30 " 

a :: 

25, 1863 


Promoted to Captain. 
Discharged June 21, 1864; promoted. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Deceased September 17, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned June 13, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Deceased September 17, 1862. 
Revoked. 
Died June 4, 1863. 
Honorably discharged April 25, 1866. 
R,-v,,ked. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed at Kenesaw. 
Killed June 17, 1864. 
Resigned September 21, 1864. 


John H Gro"e 


John C. Lewis 
Reese R. Finley 
Gordan Lolland 
Emerson P. Brooks 
Moses B. Gist 
Joseph Collins 
Jeremiah Hall 
E/.ra McConnell.. 
Win. Massi-- 
Cvrus A. Earnst 
Charles L. Duiueld 
Henry Hens.-!. 
Miram J. Davis 
Einmitt Heading; on 
P S Sudan .. . 


Wm.S. Hat -h.-r 


Win B T idd 


July 
\pril 
May- 
June 


"!, 


: iii 


Aug. 
|1 


25, 1863 


ll"nry Mclutvre . ... 


Israel P. White 
James H. Odcll 



THIRTIETH OHIO INFANTRY. 



201 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutouant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do t 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 




Feb. 

May 

July- 
Sept. 
Nov. 


29, 18>>4 
29, 
29, 
9, 
9, 
25, 
2:"), 
26, 
3, 
18, 


Feb. 

May 
July 

Sept. 
Nov. 


29, 1864 
29, " 
29, " 
9, " 
9, " 
2. r ), " 
2 ), " 
26, " 
3, " 
18, " 
18, " 
IS, " 
18, " 
18, " 
11, 1865 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
14, 1861 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
14, " 
29, " 
28, " 
20, " 
9, 1862 
28, " 
<s, " 
1, " 
1, " 

12, " 


Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to aptain. 
romoted to Captain. 
Killed at Dallas. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned June 14, 1865. 
Mustered out with resiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned November 1, 1861. 
Res i^ned- 
Resigned Mav 15, 1862. 
lies gned January 13, 1863. 
Res gnod June 20, 18i>2. 
Pro noted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Pro noted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Pro noted to 1st Lieutenant September 17, 62. 
Pro noted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Pro noted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Deceased September 17, 1802. 
Resigned April L . 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


James D. Bain 
Diiniel Fornev 
Thomas K. White 
Isaac N. Thomas 
Joseph Dickerson 
Samuel Ho wart h 
Joseph Brooks 


Cvrus W. Delaiiey 
James-: \V. Mcllraw 


James Trotter 
Orris Parrish 
John Mellngli 
Oliver P. Demuth 
Friiukliu Fa watt 


May 
\ug 


IS, 

1*1 

IS, 

11,1 >> 
11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 

14, 1 .I 
H, 
14. 

20, 

2, 
22 


May 
Aug. 

Nov. 
Jan. 

Feb. 
May 

Aug. 


Erasmus J. Alltou 
Hiram Roney 
H(;urv C. Gamble 
John E Edmonds 
Richard L. Albrittaiu 
Jolin A Hank 




Ezra McConnell 


Nov. 
Ian. 

Feb. 

Starch 

I nne 


John C. Kickcv 

Win Magpie 




P S Sodau 




22, 
22, 
24, 
24, 

19, 
9, I >2 

28, 

17! 

IS, 

13, 

28, 


Moses B Gist 




Hi rim J IHvis 


Cyrus A. Esmist 
Win. B. Todd 
Stephen B. Wilson 
Francis E. ttussell - 
Charles L. Dutliehl 
Ennui tt Headington 
Israel P White i 


Aaron Chamberlain 


Win S Hatcher 


Sept. 


17, 
17, 


Nov. 
Dec. 

Aug. 


30 " 
3(1, " 
30, " 
30, " 
25, 1863 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Dead. 


James H. Odell 


Henry Mclntyre 
Beiij Fowler 


Oct. 
April 


27, 
17, 
2, 
2, 1 >3 


James D. Bain 
Samuel 0. Thomas 
Daniel Fornev 


Thomas K White 


Juno 


4, 


Thomas J. Evans 




April 

Juno 
May 


23] 

23! ; 

9 , 1864 


May 


25, " 
2.">, " 

9, IS64 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Isaac N. Thomas 







202 OHIO IN THE WAK. 



THIRTIETH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 



THIS regiment was organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, on the 28th day of August, 1861. 
It was armed and equipped immediately, and on the 30th was ordered to the field. 
1 The next day found the regiment at Benwood, Virginia, and on the 2d of September 
it reached Clarksburg. Here an attack was expected, and company H was sent out to reconnoiter, 
but the enemy was not discovered. Late in the evening the Thirtieth marched out the Weston 
Pike, and on the afternoon of the next day entered Weston, and camped beside the Forty-Seventh 
Ohio, with which the fortunes of the Thirtieth were afterward closely allied. Here the regiment 
received its first outfit of camp and garrison equipage. Two wagons were furnished to each 
company, and even this supply was deemed barely sufficient for transportation. In later years 
the men considered themselves fortunate if there was one wagon in the regiment; and if by any 
means the authorities should furnish two, it was a liberality for which the soldier could not be 
sufficiently grateful. 

On the 6th of September the regiment joined General Roseerans at Sutton Heights. Here 
companies D, F, G, and I were ordered to remain, and the remainder of the regiment marched 
with the army toward Summerville. Two companies (C and E) were left at Big Birch Bottoms, 
and the remainder of the regiment moved on to Carnifex Ferry, where a sharp engagement took 
place. During the night the enemy withdrew to Sewell Mountain. A considerable amount of 
arms and camp equipage, and some huge double-edged knives, with which one of the Rebels was 
to annihilate five of the Yankees, fell into the hands of the National army. A stand of colors, 
on which was inscribed "Floyd s Brigade! The price of liberty is the blood of the brave!" was 
secured by the Thirtieth. After ten days rest the regiment moved to Sewell Mountain, but the con 
dition of the roads rendered further advance impracticable, and the National army fell back to 
the Falls of the Gauley, arriving on the 8th of October. This position was called Camp E\ving. 
The enemy took position on Cotton Hill, overlooking Camp Ewing, and annoyed the National 
troops with artillery. The army advanced upon the Rebels, drove them from their position, and 
pursued them until twelve miles beyond Fayette C. H. On the 14th of November the regiment 
entered Fayetteville and quartered in the deserted houses. 

In the meantime, the detachment at Sutton was frequently engaged in expeditions against 
bushwhackers and horse-thieves. Two men of the Thirtieth were killed, and quite a number 
were wounded from time to time in various skirmishes. On the morning of the 22d of October 
a scouting party was fired upon, and one man was killed instantly. The skulking murderer 
could not be found ; and, enraged by the loss of their comrade, the soldiers killed, in cold blood, 
two men who were captured the same day. The officer in charge of the party was accused of 
complicity in the deed, and for this and other misdemeanors, he was dishonorably dismissed the 
service, by sentence of a general court-martial. 

On the 23d of December the detachment at Sutton joined the regiment at Fayetteville, and 
on the 25th the regiment held its first dress-parade. 

During the winter the regiment worked upon fortifications, which were upon several occa 
sions of signal benefit to the army. Several of the companies were sent to outposts. Company 
H was sent to the White House, on Loup Creek Road ; company A to a church five miles out, 
on the Raleigh Road, and company B to McCoy s, further out on the same road. The winter, 
though not unusually severe, was very wet, and consequently there was much sickness in the 



THIRTIETH OHIO INFANTRY. 203 

Thirtieth. On the 28th of December companies F and K, forming part of a detachment under 
Major Comly, of the Twenty-Third, started for Raleigh C. H., and on arriving were quartered in 
deserted houses. These companies returned to Fayetteville on the 10th of March, 1862, at which 
time the Thirtieth and two sections of McMullen s battery comprised the entire force at that point. 

On the 17th of April the regiment broke up winter-quarters and moved to Raleigh. From 
this point a detachment of one hundred men moved to Richmond s Ferry, on New River. The 
detachment crossed the river, and was engaged for several days in marching and scouting in 
Greenbrier County. It returned to Raleigh on the 26th, with some prisoners and horses. On 
the 5th of May the Thirtieth camped near Princeton, and on the 10th it resumed the inarch to 
Giles s C. II. At noon information was received that the troops at Giles s C. II. had been 
attacked and were falling back. The men unslung knapsacks, pushed forward rapidly, and 
joined the Twenty-Third at the mouth of the Narrows, having marched twenty miles in five 
hours, and having carried knapsacks twelve miles of that distance. But the regiment arrived 
too late. The enemy had closed the gate which led to the country beyond. The next day the 
regiment encamped at the confluence of the East and New Rivers, and company II was pushed 
forward up the Narrows, and succeeded in developing the enemy s position, and in drawing the 
fire of his batteries. This company claims to have been the first in the Thirtieth under artillery 
fire. For eight days the allowance of rations was one cracker, with a small quantity of sugar, 
coffee, beans, and rice, to each man. 

Early on the morning of the 17th of May the First Brigade of Cox s division, consisting of 
the Twelfth, Twenty-Third, and Thirtieth Ohio Regiments, and McMullen s battery, fell back to 
Princeton, where supplies were received. The next day the troops marched out the Raleigh 
Road, and on the 19th camped on the summit of the Great Flat Top Mountain. They were 
without tents, but the men stripped the bark from the large chestnut trees, and with that con 
structed huts which furnished some shelter. This place was called Camp Bark. On the 1st of 
June two companies of the Thirtieth were sent to Green Meadows, which was occupied as an 
outpost. The companies at Green Meadows were relieved from time to time. At Flat Top a site 
was selected for a new camp, and heavy details were made to prepare it. This became one of the 
most complete camps the regiment ever occupied. 

On the 16th of August the Thirtieth started to join the army in Eastern Virginia. At noon 
on the 19th the regiment reached Brownstown, at that time the head of navigation on the Ka- 
nawha, having carried knapsacks and marched ninety-five miles in three days and a half. All 
were delighted to leave the mountains ; and when the band played " Get Out of the Wilderness," 
as it come down Cotton Hill to the river, the deafening cheers that went up from the column 
showed that the hit was duly .appreciated. 

The regiment proceeded on transports to Parkersburg, where it took the cars for the 
East. On the 23d of August it passed through Washington City, and that night went into camp 
at Warrenton Junction, Virginia. Three days later the right wing reported at General Pope s 
head-quarters for guard-duty. The left wing was to follow as soon as it came off picket. Gen 
eral Pope s head-quarters were moved to Centerville, and the left wing of the Thirtieth followed 
in Robertson s brigade. At the battle of Centerville the left wing was at no time completely 
engaged with musketry, but it was compelled to lie under a heavy artillery fire. General Rob 
ertson, in his official report, says: "It moved forward under a heavy fire from the enemy s bat 
teries, in as good order as if on parade." On the 31st of August the left wing joined the right 
at General Pope s head-quarters. 

On the 3d of September the regiment joined the brigade at Upton Hills. On the 7th it 
broke camp, marched through Washington City, and at ten o clock A. M. on the 9th came in 
view of Frederick City, Maryland. The Thirtieth deployed, moved by the flank above the city, 
waded the Monocacy, advanced as skirmishers, and, converging into the line of battle, entered the 
city on the right of the Twentieth and Twenty-Third Ohio. On the 14th of September the regi 
ment arrived at South Mountain, and at nine o clock A. M. engaged the enemy s skirmishers. A 
Rebel battery, placed behind a stone fence, opened fire upon the regiment, killing and wounding 



204 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

several men. For several hours the Thirtieth lay under a terrific artillery fire, and at four 
o clock P. M. it advanced against the Rebel hattery. The enemy s lines advanced at the same 
time, and a severe engagement ensued, lasting forty-five minutes. The regiment stood its ground 
bravely, and lost eighteen men killed and forty-eight wounded. 

On the evening of the 16th of September the Thirtieth lay down within sight of the Antie- 
tam bridge. The next morning the regiment moved to the left and front, crossed the stream, 
and moved up toward the bridge, which had been carried by the National troops. Upon reach 
ing the bridge it was ordered forward on the double-quick to a stone wall five hundred yards in 
advance. It was necessary to pass over a field recently plowed in order to reach the wall. 
When the line had advanced as far as the field the men were almost exhausted, and for want of 
proper support the left flank of the regiment Avas unprotected. General A. P. Hill s division 
came down with crushing weight on the exposed flank. The regiment endeavored to execute a 
movement by the right flank, in order to avoid the blow, but it was thrown into some confusion, 
and was compelled to fall back to the river bank. The regiment lost two commissioned officers 
killed and two wounded, and eight men killed and thirty-seven wounded. The National colors 
were torn in fourteen places by the enemy s balls, and two color-bearers fell dead on the field. 
Sergeant White stood up and waved the flag defiantly in the enemy s face until he fell, never to 
rise again, and Sergeant Carter grasped the flag-staff so firmly in his death agony that it could 
with difficulty be taken from his hands. 

After remaining for a few days near the battle-ground, the regiment moved for West Vir 
ginia, and on the 10th of October crossed the Potomac at Hancock. On the same day General 
Stuart crossed the Potomac on his raid into Pennsylvania. The Thirtieth started in pursuit, but 
returned to Hancock on the 12th, and continued the journey westward. On the 13th of Novem 
ber General Ewing s brigade was directed to erect winter-quarters below the confluence of the 
Gauley and Kanawha. The Thirtieth went into camp opposite to Cannelton. Winter-quarters 
were erected. On the 30th of November the Thirtieth, with another regiment, started on a 
march into Logan County. It moved via Clifton and Brownstown ; thence up Len s Creek, cross 
ing it fifty-two times within three miles; thence down Shot Creek to Coal River; thence over 
Droity and Price Mountains, and through Chapmansville to Logan C. II. The advance charged 
into the town, killed one Rebel and captured another. The regiment returned with seventeen 
prisoners and seventy-five horses. On the 4th of December the Thirtieth marched for Browns- 
town, where it arrived the next day, and was placed on transports. The brigade consisted of the 
Fourth Virginia, and the Thirtieth, Thirty-Seventh, and Forty-Seventh Ohio, under General 
Ewing. The Thirtieth occupied the flag-ship. The fleet steamed down the river, and on the 
3d of January, 1863, it arrived at Louisville, Kentucky. It moved on down the Ohio and 
the Mississippi until it readied Helena, Arkansas, where the brigade was assigned as the Second 
Brigade to the Second Division of the Fifteenth Army Corps. 

On the 21st of January the regiment landed at Young s Point, and worked for a time on the 
canal at that place. In March the Thirtieth moved on an expedition to the relief of some gun 
boats .in Steel s Bayou, and returned to Young s Point March 28th. On the 17th of April a fleet 
was preparing to run the batteries at Vicksburg volunteers were called for, and Lieutenant 
George E. O Neal, of company G, and Quartermaster A. B. Chamberlain, of the Thirtieth, with 
a sufficient crew from the regiment, took charge of the Silver Wave and successfully ran the 
blockade only one shot striking the boat. On the 29th of April the regiment embarked on the 
R. B. Hamilton, and with other troops engaged in a demonstration on Raines s Bluff. It 
returned to Young s Point at one o clock A. M. on the 2d of May, and on the same morning at 
six o clock it embarked and proceeded to Milliken s Bend. After spending a few days at 
this place and in the vicinity, the regiment returned to Young s Point, arriving at twelve M. on 
the 3d of May. At three P. M. on the same day the regiment took up the line of march down 
the river. A short distance below Warrenton it embarked on the Silver Wave, and landed at 
Grand Gulf at four o clock P. M. on the loth of May. That same evening the regiment began 
its march. It moved by way of Rocky Springs, Raymond, and Champion Hills, and on the 19tl 



THIRTIETH OHIO INFANTRY. 205 

of May it was in the rear of Vieksburg, in front of Fort Beauregard, on the Old Grave Yard 
Eoad. 

On the afternoon of the 20th of May the regiment participated in a demonstration in favor 
of an assault made on the left. In three hours the regiment fired forty-five thousand rounds of 
cartridges. On the 22d of May, at ten o clock A. M., the Thirtieth led an assault on the works 
in General Sherman s front. The regiment was preceded by a storming party of one hundred 
men. The flag was placed on the Rebel parapet, and guarded there until night enabled the 
troops to retire. The three leading companies of the Thirtieth suffered severely, losing fortv- 
seven men killed and wounded. From this time until the surrender of Vicksburg the regiment 
was engaged in demonstrations against the enemy s works and in fatigue and picket-duty. The 
casualties of the Thirtieth during the siege were one commissioned officer killed and six 
wounded, and six men killed and forty-eight wounded. After the surrender of Vicksburg the 
regiment marched to Jackson, and upon the evacuation of that place by the Rebels it returned 
as far as Black River and went into camp July 23d. 

The regiment, with the army, left Black River on the 26th of September and the next day 
embarked on transports at Vicksburg and moved up the river, arriving at Memphis on the 2d of 
October. On the 4th of October the regiment left Memphis and on the 20th of November it 
camped at Brown s Ferry, ten miles from Chattanooga. On the 24th it was in position in front 
of Mission Ridge, and on the 25th, in company with a detachment of the Fourth Virginia, it 
assaulted and carried the outer line of the enemy s works. Later in the day the Thirtieth and 
Thirty-Seventh Ohio made two unsuccessful assaults on the works on Tunnel Hill ; the Thirtieth 
losing thirty-nine men killed and wounded. On the 26th of November the Rebels evacuated and 
the regiment joined in the pursuit, returning to Bridgeport, Alabama, on the 19th of December. 
Here the regiment received supplies. On the 29th of November two days rations had been 
issued, and from that time until arriving at Bridgeport the regiment had subsisted off the country; 
and, in addition to this, one-fourth of the men were without shoes. 

On the 26th of December the regiment took up the line of march, and on the 29th went into 
camp at Bellefonte Station. Here the Thirtieth proceeded to erect quarters, at the same time 
sending out foraging parties. The regiment moved to Larkin s Ferry, on the Tennessee River, 
on the 26th of January, 1864, and thence to Cleveland, Tennessee, where a sufficient number of 
men re-enlisted to make it a veteran regiment. It was one of the largest in the division, number 
ing three hundred and fifteen men. The regiment was ordered North, and arrived at Columbus, 
Ohio, on the 8th of April. The next day the men were furloughed. On the 9th of May the 
regiment re-assembled at Columbus, and on the 10th started for the South, proceeding by way of 
Cincinnati, Louisville, Nashville, and Chattanooga, to Kingston, Georgia, where it arrived May 
20th. On the morning of the 23d the regiment was on the march. It moved through Dallas 
and Acworth, and on the 19th of June reached the foot of Kenesaw Mountain. During this 
march the regiment was almost continually under fire. On the 26th of June the Thirtieth, with 
its division, moved three miles to the right of the former position, and the next day made an 
assault on the Rebel works. The regiment advanced for a quarter of a mile on the "double- 
quick" over an open field, then through a low woods, from the farther end of which it drove 
the Rebel skirmishers in gallant style, and still pressed on and formed under a heavy cross-fire 
of artillery and musketry. As the regiment was unable to harm the enemy by its fire it fell back 
to the Rebel skirmish-line, and then to the other edge of the woods, where it was sheltered com 
paratively well. In this attack it lost thirty-five men killed and wounded. 

On the afternoon of the 2d of July the regiment was on the march. On the 13th it passed 
through Marietta, and on the 20th was within two and a half miles of Atlanta. On the 22d of 
July the enemy assaulted that portion of the line in which the Thirtieth was posted. The line 
at first gave way, but soon re-formed and repulsed the enemy. In this engagement the regiment 
lost twenty-seven men killed, wounded, and prisoners. On the 28th of July the enemy attacked 
the Second and Fourth Divisions of the Fifteenth Corps with great dash and determination, but 
was repulsed with heavy loss four successive times. The regiment maintained its ground man- 



206 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

fully and lost thirty men killed and wounded. The enemy abandoned a stand of colors under 
the regiment s fire, and one hundred and five dead Rebels were picked up in its immediate front. 
Private Hay den DeLany, of company B, seized a wagon load of ammunition which was stam 
peding, drove it under fire in rear of the line, and supplied the troops with cartridges. For 
bravery in this instance and general good conduct he was appointed a cadet at West Point, and 
reported there upon the arrival of the regiment at Washington, D. C., in 1865. The regiment 
was transferred to the First Brigade on the 5th of August, and on the 29th those who were not 
veterans were mustered out by reason of the expiration of their term of service. 

On the night of the 30th of August the regiment went on picket within one mile of Jones- 
boro , and the next day the Rebels attacked the line of the First Brigade but were repulsed. In 
this engagement the Thirtieth lost twenty-five killed and wounded. On the 2d of September the 
enemy evacuated Jonesboro , and the regiment pursued them to Lovejoy s Station. On the 5th it 
returned, and on the 8th went into camp at East Point. Here some weeks were spent in resting 
and refitting. On the 5th of October the regiment moved in pursuit of Hood s army into Ala 
bama. It returned and went into camp near Atlanta on the 13th of November. On the 15th of 
November it Avas again on the march, and on the 13th of December it was in front of Fort 
McAllister. The First Brigade occupied the right of the assaulting line. At a given signal all 
moved forward, pressed on to the crest of the works and engaged the enemy in a hand-to-hand 
conflict. The Thirtieth, Forty-Seventh, and Seventieth Ohio were specially mentioned in the offi 
cial report of General Hazen, the division commander. On the 15th of December the regiment 
moved on an expedition to destroy the Gulf Railroad. It returned to Fort McAllister on the 
21st, and remained in camp near the fort during the remainder of the month. 

On the 1st of January, 1865, the regiment marched for Savannah, and the next day encamped 
just outside of the city. On the 14th it moved to Thunderbolt. On the 17th it embarked, and 
on the 18th it went into camp just outside of the fortifications of Beaufort. On the 26th of Jan 
uary the regiment moved out to Gay s Hill, on the 30th it camped at Pocotaligo Station and 
waited for the trains to close up. On the 1st of February the Thirtieth was fairly started on the 
campaign of the Carolinas. The regiment reached Shilling s Bridge, over the North Edisto, 
on the 12th of February, and effected a crossing about three miles below the bridge. A swamp, 
a mile in width and waist deep, lay on the Rebel side of the river, and this had to be waded 
after the main current was crossed. When the troops emerged from the swamp they were sub 
jected to the fire of the enemy s skirmishers, but the National line advanced with a hurrah, 
drove back the Rebels, and captured many prisoners. The regiment passed through Columbia 
on the 17th of February, and pushed on, corduroying and skirmishing, until the 20th of March, 
when it had a sharp engagement with the enemy at Harper s Farm. On the 24th of March the 
regiment arrived at Goldsboro , marched two miles out the Newbern Road and went into camp 
and remained until the 10th of April. The Thirtieth arrived at Raleigh on the 14th of April, 
and remained there until the 29th, when it moved for Washington, D. C., by way of Richmond. 
The regiment passed through Richmond on the 13th of May, and on the 23d bivouacked at night 
at the south end of the Long Bridge over the Potomac at Washington. The next morning the 
column moved at daylight, and after passing in review in front of the White House, the Thir 
tieth moved out Fourteenth Street and went into camp four miles from the city. 

On the 2d of June the regiment left Washington and proceeded to Louisville, Kentucky, and 
went into camp, June 7th, near the City Water Works. On the 13th it was detailed as the head 
quarter guard of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and was relieved June 25th, and on the same day 
embarked for Little Rock, Arkansas, arriving July 5th. Here the time was spent in the ordi 
nary routine of camp life until the 13th of August, when the regiment was mustered out. It 
embarked immediately for Columbus, Ohio, and arrived August 21st. It was paid and discharged 
on the 22d, having traveled, as a regiment, during its term of service, a distance of thirteen 
thousand two hundred miles. 



THIBTY-FIKST OHIO INFANTRY. 



207 



31st REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



HANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 


MOSES B. WALKER 


Aug. 

Feb. 
June 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Feb. 

June 

83!" 

Sept. 
March 
Feb. 
Sept. 


10, 
6, 

28, 

a, 

2,s , 
28, 
28, 
20, 
13, 
4, 
15, 
11, 
4, 
24, 


1861 

1. ti2 
18(15 
186.1 

1862 

I86.i 
1861 
IfifH 
1861 

isc,:; 

1861 


Sc ( pt. 

Feb. 
Juno 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
March 
June 

838? 

S<-pt. 
March 

Xov. 

Sept. 


28, 
-", 
27, 
"i, 
28 
20 
20, 

4, 

27, 
11, 

1", 
27, 


1861 

1862 

ISCo 
1861 

1862 

186.5 
1S61 
1SIVI 
1861 
1S63 

1861 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned February 27, 1862. 
Promoted to Colonel Fortieth U. S. C. T. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out of service. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Declined. 
Honorably discharged December 5, 1864. 

Mustered out at expiration of service. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned January 11/1863. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Resigned April 26, 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned April 30, 1S62. 


FI;I-:I:KICK W. LISTKK 
MILTON B. W. HARMON 
SAMUKI, L. LEFFINGWKLL... 

FREDERICK W. LlSTKR 

SAMUEL il. MOTT 


Do 


GEOKOK T. WAI.KEI: 
JOHN 11 AuTi i; 




KLI \s S Cn \i i Fi, 


Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 


1 L M o r \ T 


R W VAIJNKY 




L. F. DRAKE 


Captain 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

8 


Win. M. Howcn 


Sept. 


9 , 
3, 

4, 
7, 
19, 


" 


- 


27 


" 


Samuel R. Mutt 

Lvniun J. Jackson 
Win. 11. Free 





it 


27, 
27, 
27, 

27 


l.sf>2 

1863 
1864 

1865 
1861 

1862 
18153 

1864 


Promoted to Major. 
Promoted. 
Honorably discharged December 30, 1863. 
Resigned November 3, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Resigned February 1, 1863. 
Deceased. 
Mustered out September 19, 1864. 
Declined promotion. 

Mustered out March 12, 1865. 
On Gen. Morgan s staff at muster out of reg t. 
Resigned May 14, 1SS3. 
Resigned January 11, 1863. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Killed June 23, 1864. 
Resigned Decembers, 1863. 
Discharged February 24, 1864. 
Resigned December 15, 1864. 
Resigned January 30, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Major. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
.Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned as 1st Lieutenant May 30, 1S65. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned October 1, 1862. 
Discharged August 19, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain by President. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned June 6, 1.S62. 
Discharged April 27, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out September 24, 1864. 
Resigned November 7, 1862. 
Killed November 2;>, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Revoked. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Discharged February 15, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned 
Resigned September 22, 1864. 
Resigned October 2, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Discharged August 29, 1S64. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Revoked. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. ^ 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 


David 11. Miller 


Do 


John II Putnam 


Ian. 
Feb. 

March 

Arril 
Oct. 


1 

28 J 
8, 
28, 
13, 
30, 

r, 


1862 

1863 
1864 

1865 


Tan. 
Feb. 

March 
June 
Xov. 

Jan. 

Feb. 
June 
March 

Oct. 

April 


27] 

28, 

n t 

!"! 

24, 
1, 

18, 
17, 
17, 
23, 
17, 
11, 
U. 
21, 
12, 
12, 
12, 
12, 
20, 

, 
6, 
20, 
20, 
27, 
27, 
27, 
<>~ 

27^ 

27, 
27, 

27| 
27^ 

8\ 
28, 
24, 

27, 

17, 
17. 
18, 
30, 
28 
17, 
23, 
17, 
17, 

sj 

10, 

111 

11, 

11, 

21, 

12, 


Do 


D-ivi 1 C Ro- " 


Do 

Do 


Win. II. Wad" 


Do 
Do 


John L. Williams 

Michael Stone 


Do 


( has. O. Jt.liiu- 


Do. 
Do 


Henry C. Greiner 
Edwin C. Denk 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Milton B. W. Harmon 
James A. Cahill 
Win. H. Snltin 

Jollll 11. McCuile 

Abraham V. Barber 
James J. Donahou 
Eli Wilkins 
George T. Walker 
Albert S. Scott 
Henry S Bvers 


Xov. 
Jan. 

Feb. 
May 

March 

Jan. 
Oct. 

April 
Juno 


3, 
U, 
11, 
1, 
14, 
H, 
11, 
Hi 
1 2, 
12, 
12, 
12, 
20, 
6, 
6, 


Do 


Chas. 11. Hood 


Do 
Do. 


Alfred 1 . Alpin 
Win Carlisle 


Do 
Do. .. 


Wm. 11. M.C Arthur 
Einanuel ( lark 


Do 
Do 
Irft Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 


Wm. Bennett 
Warren Clark 


Aug. 

Sept. 

Feb! 

April 
) line 
Ans?. 

( let. 

Nov. 

Oct. 
June 
Feb. 
Lm. 
May 
July 
Oct. 
April 
March 

Oct. 


2o! 
6, 

9J 
10, 
3, 
4, 

9\ 
19, 
21, 

23, 

s , 

f;o , 

6, 
19, 

1, 

2, 
7, 
5, 
Hi 
1, 
11, 
11, 
I, 
1, 
29, 
11, 
11, 
11, 
21, 
12, 


1861 

IShS 
1S64 


Sept. 

Jan. 
Feb. 

Tune 
Aug. 
Oct. 

Nov. 
March 
Nov. 
lune 
Feb. 
Juno 

J lib- 
Dec. 
Jan. 
March 

Oct. 


Henry S Babbitt 


Samuel Lyons 
John L.Williams 
Kduin C. IVni" 


Michael Stone 


Henrv C. Greiner 
Oliver Kckles 
Jolin M. Hills 

W 11 Sut ton 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do! 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


James A. Cahill 
John 11. MeCune 
George 1 . Stiles 
Isaac P. Primrose 


Abraham V. Barber 
I homas W. Beacham 
rallies J Donahoe 


James W. Martin 
Milton B. W. Harmon 
John S. Harbaugh 


James T. Ilayden 
George M. Morris 
Kli Wilkins 
Sibis Daw 
Albert S. Scott 
Jolui J Martin 


Henrv S Bvers 


Charks H. Hood 
Mfred P Alpin 


Wm Carli-lf 


Wm. H. MeArthur 
Kmamiel Clark 
oluinbu.s L. Williams 
Win. W. Spurrier 









208 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF BANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Licutenaru 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do- 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Win. Bennett 


Oct. 12, 1364 


Oct. 


12, 1864 


Warren Clark > 
J. J. Miller. ... 


12, " 
" 12, " 
April 20, 186;-> 
20, " 
20, " 
June 6, " 

" f> " 

" 20, " 
Aug. 7, 1861 


April 
Juno 

Sept. 

Jan. 
Feb. 
April 
June 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Dec. 
Feb. 

June 

July 
Feb. 
March 

June 


12, 

12, 

20, 1 K) 

20, 
20, 
6, 
b, * 
6, 
6, 
20, 
27, 1 M 
27, 

27* 
27, 
27, 
27, 
27, 
27, 
28, 1 \2 
U, 
10, 
3, 
24, " 
1, 
13, 
17, 
17, 
IS, 1 
23, 

1 : 

23| 

S t 
17, 
4, 
17, 
17, 
27, 
13, 1 M 
11, 

I . : : 

11, 

H, 
n, I 

16, 1 65 
16, 
16, 

% 


Henry Kosher 
J .lines A. North 
Alex. F. Kirkpatrick 
Benj. Brown 
Samuel W. Bntt 
Harrison Allspaugh 


John Stollsmith 


I.saac P. Primrose 


Abraham V. Barber 
James E Howe- 


Sept. 3, " 

" li>! " 
21, " 
" 23, " 
24, " 

21\ " 
Jan. 28, 1862 
Feb. 19, " 
March 14, " 
May 10, " 
April 30, " 
June 6, " 
July 13, " 
Aug. 10, " 
Nov. IS, " 
Jan. 20, 1863 

;; j. ;: 

" 2,1 " 
Feb. 12, " 
1, " 
Mav 5, " 
Jan. 11, " 
Dec. 1, 18t>2 
May 14, 1863 
June 6, " 
July 1, " 
Dec. IS, " 
March 11, 1864 
Dec. IS, 1863 
March 11, IstVl 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
" 21, " 
June If., 1805 
16, " 
16, " 
41 in. " 
" 20, " 


Thomas W. Beacham 
John Hartshorn 


G eo W Reed 


James W. Martin 
G.-o \V Morri* 


Milton B. W. Harmon 
J. W. Litlev 




Thomas J. Spencer 




Albert S. Scott 
John J. Martin 
Chas. Babbitt 
Anson B. White 
Silas Daw 
Eli Wilkins 


Alfred P Alpin 




J J Miller 


Wm Carlisle 


Cluis 11 Hood 


Wm H Me Arthur 


John W l.ieketts 


S. A. Pollock 


John H. Col burn 
Henry S. Byers 
Columbus L. Williams 
Win W Spurrier 


Emamiel Clark 




John E Jones 


Samuel Southard 


Win. Bennett 


Warren Clark 
Thompson Gallaher 


Hamilton 11. Henry 

John Stollsmith 


Nathan V. B. Grist 





Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out as Adjutant. 

Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out as Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant ; revoked 

Uesiiined July 13, 1SI12. 

Discharged June 27, 1S63. 

Resigned February 12, 1863. 

Mustered out May 10, 1862. 

Kesigticd March 14, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned January 8, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Discharged November 18, 1862 

Resigned May 3. 1S63. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieut.; resigned Oct. 10, 1863. 

Resigned October 14, 1863. 

Resigned January 20, 18(3. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned August 11, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned September 14, 1864. 

Resigned September 20, 1864. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned September 23, 1864. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Mustered out with regiment. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out with regiment. 



THIRTY-FIRST OHIO INFANTRY. 209 



THIRTY-FIRST OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE THIRTY-FIRST OHIO was organized at Camp Chase between the 4th of 
August and the 7th of September, 1861. On the 27th of September the regiment received 
marching orders, and reported to Brigadier-General O. M. Mitchel at Cincinnati. Com 
panies A and B had been detached and sent to Gallipolis to guard Government stores, but they 
joined the remainder of the regiment at Cincinnati. The regiment quartered at the Orphan 
Asylum, and received many favors from the citizens. On the 31st it left Cincinnati, and on the 2d 
of October reached Camp Dick Robinson, Kentucky, where a regular course of drill began, 
which rendered the regiment more efficient. It remained until the 12th of December, when it 
moved to Somerset, thence on several reconnoissances, and on the 19th of January, 1862, it marched 
to the assistance of General Thomas at the battle of Mill Springs, but on account of bad roads 
it arrived too late to participate in the engagement. Here the regiment was assigned to the 
First Brigade, First Division, Army of the Ohio. Preparations were made to follow the 
retreating Rebels, but the plans were changed and the troops moved to Lebanon, and from 
there to Louisville. The regiment embarked on the Magnolia, and proceeding down the Ohio 
and up the Cumberland landed at Nashville. Owing to the crowded condition of the men, and 
the difficulty in cooking rations on the transports, much sickness occurred, so that on disembark 
ing there were only five hundred men fit for duty. 

After a short rest the health of the men improved greatly, and the regiment moved south 
ward with Buell s army. The brigade halted four miles below Columbia, under orders to collect 
all the transportation for the army and to act as escort during the remainder of the march. The 
train was divided into four sections, and one regiment was assigned to each section. The Thirty- 
First was assigned to the left section, and brought up the rear. By a vast amount of labor the 
brigade succeeded in reaching Clifton with the train, where the troops and supplies were placed 
on transports and conveyed to Pittsburg Landing. The regiment advanced with the army toward 
Corinth, and during the march was engaged frequently in skirmishing with the Rebels. It par 
ticipated in the siege, and was engaged at times quite warmly. After the evacuation it marched 
in pursuit of the Rebels about forty miles, and then returned and went into camp near Corinth. 
On the 22d of June the regiment marched in the direction of luka. The weather was intensely 
warm, and the troops rested during the heat of the day and made up for the lost time by night 
marches. There was some fighting near luka but the troops moved into the town, and on the 
26th continued the march toward Tuscumbia, where they arrived on the 28th. The Rebels were 
recruiting and organizing troops in the vicinity of Tuscumbia, and the regiment was engaged in 
expeditions against them. 

Here the Fourth of July was celebrated. The Declaration of Independence was read, and 
speeches were made by General Fry, Colonels Walker, Steadman, and Robt. McCook. The regi 
ment was divided into detachments, and two companies were sent to Decatur and one company 
was sent to Trinity. On the morning of the 19th the brigade marched for Huntsville by way of 
Decatur. It arrived at the latter place on the 22d, and at once commenced to cross the Tennessee 
River on a small ferry-boat, which was manned and run by the men of company K. In the regi 
ment were engineers and mechanics of every sort, so that the regiment was always able to 
perform any kind of duty that might devolve upon it. 

After the brigade had crossed the river a messenger arrived with the information that the 
detachment of the regiment at Trinity, consisting of twenty-eight men, had been attacked by a 
force of between two and three hundred mounted Rebels. The Rebels were repulsed, but one- 
half of the detachment was killed or wounded. A train of cars had arrived in Trinity just as 
VOL. II. 14. 



210 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

the attack began, and after the Rebels were driven off the detachment took the train and came 
to Decatur, bringing the killed and wounded. It was rumored that Wheeler intended to attack 
Decatur, and six companies of the Thirty-First were crossed secretly at night and stationed in 
the town. No attack was made; but at daylight Rebel flags were seen floating from several of 
the principal dwelling-houses. These houses were searched and arms of every description were 
found and destroyed. 

. The regiment moved with the army to Huntsville, and thence to Decherd, Tennessee. From 
this point the regiment advanced toward the mountains, and was engaged in guarding passes and 
watching the enemy until the campaign of Buell and Bragg in Kentucky opened, when it moved 
to Decherd and, with other troops, was placed in charge of the transportation of the army. The 
regiment marched through Murfreesboro and Nashville to Louisville. After a short rest the 
troops again moved southward. At the battle of Perryville the regiment was under fire but was 
not actively engaged. After the battle the march was continued to Nashville. From this point 
the army moved toward Murfreesboro , the brigade, of which the Thirty-First was a part, occu 
pying the extreme right. By an accident the brigade became separated from the main army, 
but it effected a junction on the Murfreesboro Pike, about half-way between Lavergne and 
Stewart s Creek. Here the brigade was ordered to remain until further orders, while the 
remainder of the army moved on to Murfreesboro . While in camp at this point it was reported 
that the Rebels were pillaging the train at Lavergne. The Thirty-First and two other regiments 
marched back rapidly, attacked the Rebels and drove them off, killing, wounding, and capturing 
quite a number of them. When the battle of Stone River opened the brigade was ordered to the 
front, and arrived as the right wing of the army was falling back. It was actively engaged 
during the battle, and the Thirty-First acquitted itself nobly. 

The regiment now enjoyed a few months rest, and on the 23d of June, 1863, it started on 
the Tullahoma campaign. On the 26th it was engaged at Hoover s Gap, and in connection with 
the Seventeenth Ohio, it carried a position defended by two Rebel brigades. The next day the 
Rebels were forced back, and at Fairfield the wounded of the previous day s fight were captured, 
numbering over three hundred. The advance continued through Tullahoma to Chattanooga. 
The regiment was engaged on both days at Chickamauga and suffered severely. Its next engage 
ment was Brown s Ferry, and then followed Mission Ridge, where the Thirty-First was among 
the foremost regiments to bear the loyal standard into the enemy s works. About this time the 
regiment re-enlisted and received a furlough for thirty days. W T hile in the North three hundred 
and seventy-four recruits were obtained, thus increasing the regiment s effective strength to about 
eight hundred men. The regiment returned to the field at the expiration of the furlough, and 
on the 7th of May, 1864, it marched on the Atlanta campaign. On the 14th it was engaged in 
an assault on the enemy s line in front of Resaca, and lost heavily. It participated in all the 
important engagements of the campaign except the battle of Jonesboro . After the fall of 
Atlanta the regiment marched in pursuit of Hood, but the chase was abandoned at Gaylesville, 
Alabama, where the troops rested a few days and then returned to Atlanta. 

The Thirty-First moved with Sherman s army toward the sea, leaving Atlanta about noon 
on the 16th of November. It passed through Decatur and along the Augusta and Atlanta Rail 
road to Covington, and thence through Monticello to Milledgeville, where the arsenal, with a 
considerable amount of arms and ammunition, was destroyed. The march was continued with 
out any incident of particular note until the 12th of December, when the works around Savannah 
were reached. After the surrender of the city the regiment remained quietly in camp until the 
20th of February, 1865, when it moved on the campaign of the Carolinas. The route lay through 
Barnwell to the Augusta and Charleston Railroad at Aiken s Station ; across the South and North 
Edisto to Lexington, and through Winnsboro toCheraw; thence to Fayetteville, and on with the 
movement of the main army until the surrender. After this the regiment moved to Washington 
City, and participated in the grand review. It was then transferred to Louisville, Kentucky, 
where it was mustered out on the 20th of July, 1865. With as little delay as possible it was 
transferred to Camp Chase, Ohio, and the men paid and discharged. 



THIRTY-SECOND OHIO INFANTRY. 



211 



32d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME, 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Calonel 


THOMAS II. FORD 
BKNJ. F. POTTS 
J J IIIBBITTS 


July 
Dec. 
Mav 
July 
Nov. 
Dec. 
July 
May 
July 
Jan. 
May 
Juno 
Aug. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
July 
March 
June 
April 

Sept. 

Oct. 
Sept. 
March 
Aug. 

.Sept. 

March 

April 
June 
Nov. 
April 
May 
Sept. 


26, .861 

25, 1862 
IS, 1865 
26. 18(11 
21, 1862 

27 , 1863 

is, 18H5 

26, 1SC.1 
13, 1863 
IS, 1865 

21 \ 1861 
i3, 1862 
IS. 1863 
2(1, 1861 

31. 18111 
4, 1862 
11, 1M13 

H, " 
1, 1864 
29, " 
,s, " 
20, " 
12, " 
5, ISfil 
Ls, 1862 
16, 1861 
20, 
20, " 
31, " 
31, " 
4 > " 
4, " 
5, " 
5, 

2(l] 1862 

17, " 
24, " 

10, " 
24, " 
15, " 


Sept. 

Dec. 

May 
Sept. 
Dec. 

Aug. 
May 
Sept. 
Jan. 
May 
June 



Jan. 

Sept. 

July 
March 
June 
April 

Sept. 

Oct. 
Sept, 
April 
Sept. 

March 
May 

Dec. 


lf>, 1861 
25, 18(12 
18, !S(i5 

id, ix6i 

21, 1862 
25, " 
25, 1863 
18, 18(15 
16, 1861 
19, 1863 
Is 186") 


Discharged November 8, 1862. 
Appointed Brigadier-General. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Honorably Discharged Nov. 21, 1862. 
Promoted to Colonel, Dec. 25, 1862. 
Resigned July 27, 1863. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out witli regiment. 
Honorably discharged January 13, 1863. 
Resigned September 21, 1864. 




Do 

Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 


KBENEZER H. SWIXNKY 
BEKJ. F. POTTS 

ROBERT II. BENTLiCY 


SHELDON GUTHRIE, .In 
.SYLVESTER M. UEWKTT 
A. 31. CRUMBACKEH 
ALEX. R. PATTERSON 
ISVAC B POST 


Ifi! W 

3<>| 8113 
20, 864 
16, 8(11 
23, 862 
11, 863 
10, " 
1, 1864 
29, " 

$ :: 

16, 1861 
5, 1862 
16, 1861 
16, " 
16, |] 

16 

16, 
16, 
16, 
1(1, 
16, 
20, 1862 

% " 
27, " 
27, " 

07 ** 

27 j " 
27, " 


Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned January 22, 1862. 
Resigned January 18, 1863. 
Resigned September 27, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Honorably discharged March 13, 1863. 
Re-signed February 29, 1864. 
Died? 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Discharged August 9, 1864. 
Declined. 
Declined. 
Died March 27, 1865. 
Resigned March 17, 1862. 
Mustered out at expiration of service. 
Resigned March 15, 1862. 
Discharged December 22, 1862. 
Discharged May 4, 1863. 
Resigned June 17, 1862. 
Honorably discharged June 18, 1863. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Nov. 21, 62 
Mustered out. 
Resigned May 24, 1862. 
Resigned February 11, 1862. 
Resigned April 10, 1862. 
Resigned April 10, 1863. 
Promoted to Major January 13, 1863. 
Discharged May 4, 1864. 
Resigned September 16, 1864. 
Appointed Captain 26th Battery Dec. 22, 1863. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel July 27, 1863. 
Resigned. 
Resigned June 29, 1863. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned September 18, 1864. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned. 
Promoted to Major. 
Resigned September 8, 1864. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered mu. 
Mustered out at expiration of service. 
On detached duty. 
Mustered out July 23, 1865. 
Mustered out May 15, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment, 
Killed at Bentonville, North Carolina. 

Complimentary commissions given after 
mustered out. 

Promoted to Captain December 25, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain March 15, 1862. 
Resigned November 30, 1861. 
Discharged October 23, 1862. 
Resigned March 13, 1862. 
Resigned November 25, 1861. 
Resigned April 5, 1862. 
Discharged August 20. 1862. 
Promoted to Captain May 24, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain March 20, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain April 10, 1862. 
Resigned January 24, 1864. 
Declined. 
Never in the regiment. 
Resigned April 27, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 


JOHN COUKY 
JAMES B. BUCHANAN 
ALFRED C. BRUNDAGE 
THOMAS P. B.NI 
ALFRED C. BRUNDAGE 


JOHN MORGAN 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Do. 
Captain 


THOMAS P. BOND 


L. A. GRIMES 

\V. H. 1 ULT 


A. J. PATTERSON 


IOHN A. HOLIDAY 
WM. H. NICKERSON. 
RUSSELL B BENNETT 




Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

DO: .::::::: 

Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


\Vm A Palmer 




Win. B. Bowlaud 
Milton W Worden 


Benj. F. Potts 
Win. D. Hamilton 
George 31. Baxter 


Wilson M. Stanley 
Jay Dvcr 
Clarkson C. Nichols 
Abraham M. Crumbacker. 
Joseph Gladden 
Wm. M. Morris 
Theobald D. Yost 
Tefferson J. Ilibbitts 
Samuel R. Breesc 
Lovi J Saint 




Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
May 
June 

July 
May 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Nov. 

May 
June 
July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Feb. 


1, 1863 
22, 1862 
13, 18(13 
4, " 
30, 
18, 
27, 
25, 1864 
H, 
12, 
18, 
IS, " 
26, " 
18, 1865 

c , " 

6, " 
18, 
18, 

18 ! 

10, 1*61 
1(5, 
20, 4 
20, 
31, 
31, 
4, 
4, " 
r , " 
5, " 
7, " 
9, 18C2 
9, 
9, 
8, 
8, 


Jan. 

July 

Aug. 
May 

Aug. 
Oct. 
Nov. 

May 
Juno 
Sept. 

Jan. 

Feb. 


19, 1863 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
20, " 
27, " 

25^ 1864 
11, " 
12, " 
18, 
18, " 
26, " 
18, 1865 
18, " 
6, " 
6, " 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
16, 1861 
16, " 
M, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16 
16, 
16, 
9, 1862 
9, " 
14, " 
8, " 
8, " 




Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

DO! ::::::::: 

Do 

8S: ::::::::: 

Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Elias W. James 


Alex. R. Patterson 
Alfred G. Barnet 
Isaac B. Post 


Win. A. McCallister 
Richard H. Fonts 
John Wiley 
Ebenezer B. Hays 
Wm. Wise 
James F. Johnson .... 
Henry Huber 
Warren Mills 
Daniel W Wilson 


Richard Blackstone 
David R. Potts 
Chas. H. Stewart 
D Webb 


Francis K. Hyde 
Seorge W. Boyd 
Robert II. Beiitley 


Abraham M. Crumbacker. 
Alpheus B. Pannentre 
Anthony B. Raymond 


David N. Stambaugh 
Charles C. Brandt 
Albert J. Spaulding 
Samuel R. Breesf 


Clarkson C. Nichols 
Joseph Gladden 


Jerome B. Whelpley 


Abraham Norris 
Robert F. Jackson 
Francis H. Robbins 
Alex. 11. Patterson 



212 



OHIO IN THE WAR 



Iftt Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



DATE OF RANK. 



George F. Jack j March 

Theobald D. Yost | " 

Ulysses Westerbrook i April 

Abraham N orris 



David Shellenberger 

Horatio J. Johnson 

John Brady Pearce 

Elijah B. Adams. 



Sheldon Guthrie, jr 

George Sinclair 

Klias W. James 

Augustus G. llostetter 

Levi J. Cox 

Richard H. Fonts 

Cyrus A. Stephens 

John Wiley 

Ebenezer B. Hays. 



Win. A. McCallister 

Alfred G. Phillips 

John M. Statiton 

Henry Huber 
Chas. N. Mowyer 

Joseph L. Brosius 

James F. Johnson 
Win. Wist- 
John Thompson 
Warren 31 ills 
Jerome Wells 
David H.Lee 
Daniel W. Wilson 
Hit-hard Blackstone 
David K. Potts 
Chas. H. Stewart 
D. Webb.. 



Francis K. Hyde 

George W. Boyd 

John Mitchell 

John W. Myers 

Wm. L. Harrod 

Chas. C. Anderson 

Win. L. Rosegrunt 

Win. T. Daliison 

.Milton Latta 

John Porter 

James L. Tyler 

.Michael Adler 

Joseph W. Davi* 

Chas. D. Koff 



Lieutenant Robert F. Jackson.. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Abraham Norris 

Jerome B.Whelpley 

Chas. B. Church 

Benj. F. Guck 

Henry H. Ticket 

James 31. Leith 

Ulysses Westerbrook 

John S. Van 3Iartin 

George F. Jack 

Wm. H. H. Case.... 



Francis H. Hobbins 

Isaac B. Post 

Theobald D. Yost 

Jefferson J. Hii bitts 

Horatio J. Johnson 

Klias W. James 

Sheldon Guthrie, jr 

Elijah B. Adams 

Levi J. Cox 

Cerventes Fugate 

George Sinclair 

Henry Grant 

Wm. C. Runyan 

Calvin A. Bowland 

\lfred G. Barnett 

Cyrus A. Stevens 

Andrew F. Woden backer... 

Umer S. Lee 

Ebenezer B. Hays 



<ept. 

Apiil 

Sept. 

April 

Oct. 

Aug. 

June 

Chas. N. Mowyer 

James F. Johnson Dec. 

Linus II. North Jan. 

Win. A. McCallister 

Alfred G. Philli 



20, 1362 
13, 

. ,, 

March is| 
10, 



April 
March 

Oct. 

April 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

June 

Dec. 

.Ian. 



2 >, 



15, 

25, 
1, 1863 
22, 1862 



Feb. 
May 
April 

June 
July 
April 
Nov. 
April 



Aug. 



30, 

l 1864 
10, i 
20, 1864 
20, 

" 



Nov. 



May 
June 



11 . 
12, 
12, 
H, 
IS 
18, 
26, 

18, 1865 
18, " 
6, " 



hily 



Aug. 



Sept, 



Jan. 



13, 186 

Hi, " 

20, " 

20, " 

31, " 

31, " 

4, " 

4, " 



March 
April 



Joseph L. Brosius 

John Thompson 

Warren Mills 

Burton Hubble 

Jerome Wells 

Daniel W. Wilson 

Ilichard Blackstone 

David H. Lee 

Samuel B. Rigdon 

David U. Potts 

Chas. H. Stewart 

Robert F. Smart 

D. Webb 

Chas. C. Anderson 

Wm. L. Kosegrant 

Win. T. Dallisou 

Milton Latta 

John Porter 

James L. Tyler 



Feb. 
J a n . 



Nov. 

June 

.March 

July 

April 

May 
Feb. 
April 



8, 
20, 
13, 
5, 
5, 

5, 
5, 

1", 
I, 
10, 
15, 
5, 
23, 
20, 
15, 
17, 



17, " 
30, " 

18, " 

13, " 

14, | 

n] " 

18, " 
16, 1864 
27, 18>;3 
20, 1864 
20, " 
20, " 
25, " 
. >, " 
20, 1865 
20, 
20, 
20, 



COM. is.-ri:D. 



March 
May 



Sept. 
Dec. 



Feb. 
Jan. 

June 



May 
July 



Aug. 
April 



Mar 

Aug. 



1862. 



Oct. 

Nov. 

3Iay 

June 
Sept. 



1862 Resigned April a, 1862. 
" Promoted to Captain November 21, 
" i Discharged August 22, 1862. 
" [Declined promotion. 
" Resigned January 7, 1864. 
" (Resigned June 15, 1862. 
(Resigned April 15, 1863. 
11 iHonorably discharged January 30, 1S64. 
" iPromoted to Captain January 1, 1863. 
[Promoted to Captain December 22, 1863. 

Promoted to Captain January J3, 1863. 

Resigned February 18, 1863. 

Appointed 1st Lieut. 2 .th Battery Dec. 22, 63. 
" Declined promotion ; mustered out. 
1863; Resigned July 27, 1863. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain July 27, 1863. 

Killed July 22, 1864. 

Resigned August 13, 1S63. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Resigned September 15, 1864. 

Honorably discharged September 15, 1S64. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Discharged. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Declined ; no vacancy. 

Killed October 27, 1864. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain, 
moted to Captain. 



Jan. 
Feb. 



March 
May 



Sept. 
Dec. 



Ian. 
Feb. 



Tune 



July 
Jan. 
Aug. 

.Marcli 

Aug. 

April 



May 
April 



P 

Promoted to C aptai 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 
.Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 
3tustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 
Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 
Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant. 



Never in the regiment. 

Resigned January 18, 1863. 

Promoted January 9, 1862. 

Resigned January 20, 1862. 

Resigned October 13, 1861. 

Resigned April 5, 1862. 

Resigned October 15, 1861. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant April 5, 1862. 

Resigned April 10, 1S62. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 20, 1862. 

Resigned April 5, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Februarys, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 13, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant April 10, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant April lo, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Sept. 15, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant April 5, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant October 23, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 15, 1862. 

Died 3Iay 13, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant August 20, 1862. 

Died April 10, 1864. 

Resigned January 17, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 30, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 1, 1863. 

Resigned January 30, 1863. 

Appointed 2d Lieutenant 26th Battery. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 13, 18G3. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 30, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned June 24, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant February 18, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant 31ay 4, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Deserted. 

Resigned. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned August 20, 1864. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned August 20, 1864. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 



THIRTY-SECOND Onio INFANTRY. 



213 



BANK. 


KAMI:. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


RKIIARKS 


2d Lientcnuut 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Michael \lder 


M 
Ji 


XV IS, 18 

18, 
18, 
IS, 

y *, 

8, 
8, 


to 


M 

s, 


vy }f 
1 

I 
1 
t. 


, IS 


Wi 


Pro ai 

Prom 
Proj 

.Mils 
Mns 
Mus 
Mus 
Mus 
Mus 
Mus 
31 us 
Must 


oted to 1st Lieutenant. 

oti-d to 1st Lieutenant, 
otc-d to 1st Lieutenant, 
cd out with regiment, 
c ed out as 1st Sergeant 
ed out as 1st Sergeant 
e ed out as 1st Sergeant 
ed out as 1st Sergeant 
t ed out as 1st Sergeant 
red out as 1st Sergeant 
red out as 1st Sergeant 
cred out as 1st Sergeant 




Solomon K;uif m;iu 


Chillies D. Eotf. 


ttenj F Harris 


.Jacob IMnnock 


.Joseph II Kakin 


Taylor MoFaddeu 


Artilliua V. Norman 




,s, 
18, 
18, 

18, 







4 






Francis M. Ri.ler 


Win. H. .lunkins 
Win. Piper 



THIRTY-SECOND OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THIS was one of the first organizations raised in the State on the basis of three years 
service. Its rendezvous was Camp Bartley, near Mansfield, but before completion it was 
transferred to Camp Dennison, where it was completed, organized, equipped, and sent to 
the field, under the auspices of Colonel Thomas II. Ford, formerly Lieutenant-Governor of Ohio. 
The date of the commissions of the field-officers was the 26th of July, 1861. 

On the 15th of September, 1861, the regiment left Camp Dennison for West Virginia. As 
was the case with most, if not all, of the first regiments from Ohio, they were poorly equipped 
and armed with the almost useless old smooth-bore muskets of a by-gone age. The regiment 
was moved by railroad and arrived at Grafton September 18th, and marched the next day for 
Beverly, West Virginia, where it arrived on the 22d. 

At this point Colonel Ford reported for orders to Brigadier-General Reynolds, then com 
manding the District of Cheat Mountain, with head-quarters at Huttonsville, and was assigned 
to the command then stationed on Cheat Mountain Summit, with Colonel Nathan Kiruball, of the 
Fourteenth Indiana Volunteers, commanding the Post. 

The Thirty-Second had been hurried to the field without discipline of any kind in fact it 
was hardly organized. Here, upon the rugged heights of Cheat Mountain, amid the wild scenery 
of the Alleghanies, the regiment received its first lesson in the art of war. On the 3d of October, 
1861, the Thirty-Second, under orders, made a forward movement, and led the advance of the 
army against Greenbrier, Virginia, through the mountains and pines of that region by midnight. 
The regiment remained at Greenbrier during the fall of 1861, engaged in watching the move 
ments of the enemy, then commanded by the afterward renowned Rebel General R. E. Lee. 

On the 13th of December the Thirty-Second, under command of Captain Hamilton, ac 
companied General Milroy in his advance on Camp Alleghany. In his report General Milroy 
complimented the regiment very highly on its gallantry and good conduct in its charge into the 
camp of the enemy. The loss of the regiment in this affair was four killed and fourteen 
wounded, some severely. On the return from this expedition it was ordered to Beverly, where 
it remained the rest of that severe winter. The time was profitably spent in still further discip 
lining and organizing the regiment, which made necessary some changes in the roster. The 
following named officers retired and their places were filled by promotions from the ranks: 

Captains J. A. Lacy, company A; W. M. Stanley, company K, and Jay Dyer, of company I; 
Chaplain Nickerson; First Lieutenants, C. C. Brandt, J. W. McLaughlin, Albert J. Spaulding, 
and C. C. Nichols; Second Lieutenants, John Vanmeter, H. H. Ticket, J. M. Leith, B. F. Guck, 



214 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

R. R Jackson, (Adjutant), Geo. F. Jack, W. H. II. Case, and D. Stambaugh. Surgeon John N. 
Coury also retired and was succeeded by Dr. Jas. G. Buchanan, of Wellsville, Ohio. 

Still retained in General Milroy s command, the regiment took the advance of the expedition 
under that officer which resulted in the capture of Camp Alleghany, Huntersville, Monterey, and 
McDowell. About the 1st of May a further advance was made to near Buffalo Gap, seven miles 
from Staunton, Virginia. The enemy was met at this point, and, after some severe fighting, the 
National forces fell back on the main army, camped at McDowell, in the Bull Pasture Valley, 
where Generals Schenck and Milroy had united their forces, numbering about seven thousand 
men. 

The Eebel General Stonewall Jackson advanced against the National force on the Sth day 
of May, and was met on the side of the Bull Pasture Mountain. A severe battle ensued, which 
lasted from two P. M. until dark, with varied success on either side. The National forces fell 
back on Franklin, West Virginia, closely followed by the Eebel army. In this battle the Thirty- 
Second lost six killed and fifty-three wounded, some mortally. It was the last regiment to leave 
the field. Lieutenant C. Fugate, of company E, a young officer of fine promise, was among the 
mortally wounded; he died at Franklin five days after the battle. 

On the 12th of May Major-General Fremont, commanding the Mountain Department, effected 
a junction with Generals Schenck and Milroy, bringing with him about twelve thousand men. 
Before this junction, however, the Rebel General Jackson had retired from the National front. 
The combined National forces lay at Franklin inactive until the 25th of May, when they were 
ordered to the support of General Banks, then operating in the Shcnandoah Valley against the 
Rebel army under Jackson. While the army was in camp at Franklin the Thirty-Second was 
transferred from Milroy s to Schenck s brigade, composed of the Thirty-Second, Fifty-Fifth. 
Seventy-Third, Seventy-Fifth, and Eighty -Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

In Fremont s pursuit of Jackson up the Shenandoah Valley the Thirty-Second bore its part, 
and participated in the battles of Cross Keys and Port Republic, on the Sth and 9th days of June, 
1862. The regiment returned to Strausburg about the last of June, was transferred to Piatt s 
brigade, and moved to Winchester, Virginia, July 5th, 1862. It remained at Winchester doing 
garrison duty until the 1st of September, the day the place M as evacuated by General White, 
when the regiment moved with the brigade to Harper s Ferry and assisted in the defense of that 
place. After making a hard fight and losing one hundred and fifty of its number, the regiment, 
with the whole command, was surrendered by the commanding officer of the Post to the enemy as 
prisoners of war. The history of this unaccountable affair is yet to be written. The Thirty- 
Second was paroled and sent to Annapolis, Maryland, from whence it was transferred to Chicago, 
Illinois. 

In the defense of Harper s Ferry the regiment lost some gallant officers and brave men. 
Captain S. R. Breese, company II, who succeeded Captain Baxter, was killed by a musket ball, 
Captain M. W. Worden lost a leg, Lieutenant A. G. Hostetter was severely wounded in the foot, 
and Lieutenant E. B. Adams, of company F, lost a hand. Colonel Ford was placed under arrest, 
and sent to Washington for trial by a Military Commission, on the charge of having neglected his 
duty in the defense of Maryland Heights. This trial resulted in his dismissal from the service 
November 8, 1862, by order of the War Department. 

At Chicago the regiment became almost completely demoralized. It had not been paid for 
eight months, and many of the men took "French leave" and went home to look after their fam 
ilies. Captain B. F. Potts Avas sent to Columbus to ask Governor Tod to procure an order from 
the War Department transferring the regiment to Camp Taylor, near Cleveland. This application 
was successful, and the Thirty-Second, or all that was left of it, thirty-five men, arrived at Camp 
Taylor December 1, 1862. Order came out of chaos, however. 

On the 2d of December Captain B. F. Potts was appointed by Governor Tod Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the regiment, and that energetic officer went immediately to work "reconstructing" 
the command. Within ten days order prevailed, and eight hundred men had reported for duty. 
This happy result was not attained, however, without decisive action in the case of several officers 



THIRTY-SECOND OHIO INFANTRY. 215 

who were charged with inciting disaffection and revolt among the men. Secretary Stanton, of 
the War Office, ordered their instant dismissal, which was consummated on the 23d of December 
18G2. The men were paid in full, and on the 12th of January, 1863, declared to be exchanged. 
On the 18th orders were received to proceed to Memphis, Tennessee, and report to Major-General 
U. S. Grant, then commanding the Department of the Tennessee. In reorganizing the regiment, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Potts was made Colonel, Quartermaster II. II. Bentley Lieutenant-Colonel, 
Captain A. M. Crumbacker Major, Assistant-Surgeon Brundage Surgeon, and Lieutenant George 
Sinclair Captain. The regiment left Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, January 20th, reached Mem 
phis on the 25th of January, 1863, and was assigned to Logan s division, Seventeenth Army 
Corps, commanded by Major-General J. B. McPherson. On the 20th of February the Thirty- 
Second moved with the army to Lake Providence, Louisiana, and during the campaign against 
Vicksburg took a prominent part in the gallant achievements of the Third Division, Seventeenth 
Army Corps. At the battle of Champion Hills the Thirty-Second made a bayonet charge and 
captured the First Mississippi Rebel Battery men, guns, and horses with a loss of twenty-four 
men. For this gallant achievement the captured battery was turned over to the regiment, and 
manned by company F during the entire siege of Vicksburg. The total loss of the regiment 
during the campaign and siege of Vicksburg was two hundred and twenty-five, rank and file. It 
participated in the battles of Port Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills ; was in the 
extreme front of Logan s division when Vicksburg surrendered, and was assigned to post-duty 
under General Logan. 

In August, 1863, the regiment accompanied Stevenson s expedition to Monroe, Louisiana, 
and McPherson s expedition to Brownsville, Mississippi, in October of the same year. It was 
also with Sherman in February, 1864, at Meridian, and lost twenty-two men at Boher s Creek, 
Mississippi, February 5, 1864, in which last affair Captain W. A. McCallister was severely 
wounded while gallantly leading the advance. 

Colonel Potts had been assigned to the command of the Second Brigade, Third Division, 
Seventeenth Army Corps, in the autumn of 1863, and was thereafter but seldom in command of 
the regiment. In December and January, 1863-4, more than three-fourths of the regiment re-en 
listed as veterans, and on the 4th of March, 1864, it was furloughed home. It rejoined the army 
at Cairo, Illinois, on the 21st of April, with its ranks largely augmented by recruits. The only 
change made while at home was the addition of Dr. T. P. Bond, of Champaign County, as 
Assistant-Surgeon. On the 27th of April the regiment embarked at Cairo, with its division and 
corps, on transports, landing at Clifton. From thence it marched to Acworth, Georgia, where it 
joined General Sherman on the 10th of June, 1864. The Thirty-Second was identified with the 
movements of the Seventeenth Army Corps in Sherman s advance against Atlanta; participated 
in the assault on Kenesaw Mountain, June 27, 1864, and Nicojack Creek, near Ilowell s Ferry, 
on the Chattahoochie River, July 10, 1864. Also in the battles of July 20th, 21st, 22d, and 28th, 
before Atlanta, and lost more than half its number in killed and wounded. In the affair of the 
22d of July Adjutant A. G. Phillips, of Mansfield, Ohio, was killed while encouraging the men, 
and Captains Huber and Potts were severely wounded. The regiment was commanded in those 
battles by Lieutenant-Colonel J. J. Hibbetts, Colonel Potts being in command of the First Bri 
gade, Fourth Division, Seventeenth Army Corps. (On the 12th of January, 1865, Colonel Potts 
was promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General, on the special recommendation of General 
Sherman, for gallantry before Atlanta, July 22, 1864.) 

After the fall of Atlanta the Thirty-Second moved with the army in pursuit of Hood, after 
which it rejoined General Sherman and accompanied him on his "March to the Sea." 

On the 10th of December, 1864, the Thirty-Second was in the advance of the army, and con 
tributed its share toward driving the enemy into his works at Savannah. In this expedition the 
Savannah and Charleston Railroad was cut, thus destroying the enemy s communications with 
Charleston. On the 21st of December the regiment entered Savannah with the army, and went 
into camp near Fort Thunderbolt. After the review by General Sherman of the whole army, the 



216 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

Seventeenth Army Corps went by transports to Beaufort, South Carolina; thence to Pocotaligo 
Station, on the Savannah and Charleston Railroad. 

On the 1st of February, 1865, the regiment moved with the army through the Carolinas, and, 
with the Thirteenth Iowa, was the first regiment to enter Columbia. (Colonel Hibbetts, with a 
mounted detachment of the regiment, entered and captured Fayetteville, North Carolina, March 
10, 1865, after a severe fight with Wade Hampton s cavalry.) 

On the 20th and 21st of March it was engaged with the enemy at Bentonville, North Caro 
lina, where, on the 21st, Captain D. R. Potts, aide-de-camp to General B. F. Potts, was killed 
while gallantly leading the skirmish-line of the brigade in an assault on the enemy s works. 

The regiment came out of the woods to see their friends at Goldsboro , moved with the army to 
Riileigh, North Carolina, and was present at the surrender of Johnston s army, May 1, 1865. It 
marched with the army through Richmond, Virginia, to Washington City, where it participated 
in the grand review before President Johnston and Cabinet. 

The regiment remained in camp, near Washington, until June 8, 1865, when it took the cars 
for Louisville. It lay there until July 20th, when it was mustered out of the service, and pro 
ceeded to Columbus, Ohio, at which place the men received their final discharge, July 26, 1865. 

During the stay of the Thirty-Second in Washington, Lieutenant-Colonel Hibbetts was com 
missioned Colonel, vice B. F. Potts promoted ; Captain S. Guthrie was made Lieutenant-Colonel, 
and Captain Isaac B. Post, of company C, promoted to Major, vice Crumbacker, resigned. 

The Thirty-Second entered the field September 15, 1861, nine hundred and fifty strong, and 
during the war received more than sixteen hundred recruits. Only five hundred and sixty-five 
remained at its muster-out. It is believed that the regiment lost and recruited more men than 
any other from Ohio. 



The following extracts give the points of the report by the military commission above men 
tioned as to Colonel Ford s case : 

"The Court is satisfied that Colonel Ford was given a discretionary power to abandon the 
Heights, as his better judgment might dictate, and it believes from the evidence, circumstantial 
and direct, that the result did not to any great extent surprise nor in any way displease the 
officer in command at Harper s Ferry. But . . . the evidence shows conclusively that the 
force upon the Heights was not well managed ; that the point most pressed was weakly defended 
as to numbers, and, after the wounding of the Colonel of the One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth 
New York, was left without a competent officer in command, Colonel Ford himself not appear 
ing, nor designating any one who might have restored order and encouraged the men. That the 
abandonment of the Heights was premature is clearly proved. ... In so grave a case as 
this, with such disgraceful consequences, the Court can not permit an officer to shield himself 
behind the fact that he did as well as he could, if in so doing he exhibits a lack of military 
capacity. It is clear to the Commission that Colonel Ford should not have been placed in com 
mand on Maryland Heights; that he conducted the defense without ability, and abandoned his 
position without sufficient cause; and that he has shown throughout such a lack of military 
capacity as to disqualify him for a command in the service." 



THIRTY-THIRD OHIO INFANTRY. 



217 



33d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THBEE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 
Do 


JOSHUA W. SILL ... 


July 


29, 


1801 

1S65 
1S01 

1S02 
1SO.-5 

ISO I 
1S02 

1803 

1803 

1S04 

1802 

IS04 

1801 

1862 
1861 


Aug. 
Nov. 
June 

Jan. 

May 

Juno 
Aug. 
May 
Jan. 

Ma; 
Feb. 
April 
Oct. 
May 
Sept. 
Jan. 

Feb. 

March 
May 
.1 une 


2s , 
26, 

j>. 
18, 
26, 

V, 

19, 
10, 

IS 
9, 

12! 
26, 
1, 
4, 
18, 
5, 
5, 
ft, 
5, 

5! 
5, 
20, 
20, 
1, 
1, 


1861 

1S05 
1801 
1803 
lsf,4 
1865 

Mil 

SO 1 

1804 
1862 

1804 
1S02 


Prom, by Pres t to Brig. Gen. July 16, 1862. 
Resigned July 20 1864. 
Mustered out as Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Resigned September 26, 1803. 
Honorably discharged Jan. 1, 1805. 
Honorably discharged March 17, 1865. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out as Major. 
Died at Portsmouth , Ohio March 23, 1862. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Killed September 20, 1863. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Declined. 
Resigned September 20, 1864. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned October 24, 1863. 
Resigned July 3 ), Is63. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned September 30, 1862. 
Died March 23, 1862. 

Promoted to Major March 23, 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Major. 
Honorably discharged March 2, 1863. 
Promoted to Major. 
Out of service. 
Killed May 14, 1864, at Piesaca. 
Promoted to Major. 
Honorably discharged January 31, 1865. 
Resigned June 11, 1862. 
Honorably discharged March 2, 1863. 
Resigned May 30, 1863. 
Out of service. 
Declined. 
Out of service. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Major. 
Declined. 
Declined ; mustered out as Captain. 
Declined. 
Out of service. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant May 8, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with resriment. 
Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant May 8, 1865. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with ivgiment. 
Mustered out July 25, 1805. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mastered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Discharged as 1st Sergeant April 13, 1865. 
Resigned June 27, 1805. 
Appointed A. A. G. in the volunteers. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned May 2, 1S03. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 


Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


JOSEPH itINSON 
OSCAR F. MOORE 
FREDERICK J. LOCK 
JAS. II. MONTGOMERY 
BKNJ. F. BARKER 
JOSEPH HINSON 
THOMAS SIK i--s . 


Juno 
July 

Sept. 
Jan. 
May 
June 
Aug. 
March 
Jan. 

May 
lu-b. 
April 
Oct. 
May 
Aug. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Aug. 

Sept. 


2(5, 
31, 

l .. 
2fi, 

>-: 

18, 
2 ., 
1, 
23, 
16, 
20, 
2s, 
18, 

Z\ 
12, 

2l] 
4, 
23, 
5, 
10, 
10, 

ID. 


Major J. V. ROBINSON, JK 
Do FREDERICK J. LOCK 
Do RPHRAIM J. ELI.IS 
Do BEXJ. F. BARKER 


Do 




Surgeon 
Do 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Captain 
Do 
Do. 


GEORGE W. BROOKS 
DAVID WELSH 
LIONEL J. SMITH 

B. MCSENMEIR 

J. H. HAIR 


WM T ROPP 


ALBERT (L BOVER 
Samuel A. Carrie 
Wm. II. Douglass 
Frederick J. Lock 
Ephraim J. Ellis 
Jas. H. Montgomery 
Van B. Hibbs 


Do 
Do 
Do 


Do. 




Oct. 

Jan. 
March 

April 
Nov. 


M! 
i, 

:..",, 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Thaddeus A. Minshall 
Wm. McKain 
Joseph llinson 


Conduce H. Gatch 


DO: ::::::::: 
Bo 1 : ::::::::: 
K: 


Wm. W. Nixon 
Edward M. De Bruin 
Van B. Hibbs 
Cl.as. Brooker 


Tune 
[an. 
June 
March 
May 
March 


11, 
16, 

1, 

2\ 
15, 


1802 

1S63 

1804 


Feb. 
June 

March 


1, 

ID, 
15, 
26, 
26, 
26, 
15, 


1803 
1S04 


Do 


Thomas Sikes 
Krancis J. Fitzwilliams 


Dt 


Elias A. Ramsey 


May 


2. ., 


" 




K\ 


" 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Martin V. B. Morrison 
George C. Winkler 
Robert L. Ramsey 


Aug. 
Jan. 

May 

Aug. 


H, 
11, 

28^ 

28, 
1^, 
18, 
IS 
18, 
18, 
3, 
5, 
10, 
1."., 

IS 


ISO I 


Aug. 
Ian. 

May 

Aug. 
Feb. 


H, 
11, 

28^ 

28* 
28, 
18, 
18, 
18, 
18, 
18, 

5] 
5, 
5, 


1865 

I SOI 
1S62 


John J Gist jr 


Win. B. Dougherty 


Ellsworth W. Libby 
Archibald W. Rogers 
Wm. W. Downing 
Samuel II alley 
George W. Ilobv 
Daniel It. Shriver 
Sylvester Keller 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

K 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


J. Mills Kendrick 
George P. Singer 
\Vm. R. Foster 
E/.ekiel E. Colburn 
Joseph llinson 
Edward M. De Bruin 


Thomas Sikes 


Sept. 3, " 


r>; " 


Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 
Dismissed. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Out of Service. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned January 13, 1864. 
Resigned December 15, 1S03. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Killed May 28, 1864. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Deceased August 13, 1864. 
Declined. 
Dismissed July 12, 1864. 
Declined. 
Resigned as 2d Lieutenant August 24, 
Declined. 


1864. 


Robert L. Ramsey 


March 


i 


1S62 


May 


1, 


" 


Wm. W. Nixon 
Conduce II. Gatch 


Nov 

Oct. 

Jan. 
March 
June 
April 
March 
May 
March 
Sept. 
March 

May 


n , 

15, 

111 

1, 
2, 
30, 
2, 
IS 
15, 
15, 


1801 
1803 

1804 


June 

Dec. 
Feb. 
April 

Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Aug. 


3\ 
1, 
10, 
22, 
22, 

2"! 
1, 
28, 


1803 
1S64 


Charles Brooker 
Elias A. Rams-y 
Martin V. 15. Morrison 
David McCameil 
W. B. McNeil 


George G. Winkler 
Edgar J. Higbv 
John J. Gistjr 
A. L. Waddle 
Chas. R. Pomerov 


March 
May 


13*, 


Wm Ilobv 


Henrv Harrison 


Jacob Parrott .. 
Daniel A. Dorsey 
Wm. Roddick 



218 



OHIO IN THE WAB. 



BANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF KANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


KEMARKS. 


1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lirnteiiaiit 
Do. 

BS: 
& 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Frederick A. Colburn 
.Joseph II. Cole 


May 
Aug. 


25, 1864 

11, 
11, 
11, 
11, 


May 

Aug. 


25, 1864 

2. r >, 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 


Discharged July 2, 1864. 
Killed in action Sept. 1863; com sion returned. 
Mustered out March 22, 1662. 
Declined. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Cuptaii . 


Warren L. .Johnson 


Win. II. Myers 
\Vni. 1$. Doughertv.... 


Ellsworth W. Libby 


Win. W. Downing 


Jan. 
May 


ll| 
11, 
28, 18 5 
28, | 

28 ! 
2! 

28, 
28, 
18, 


Jan. 
May 


11, " 
11, " 

28, 1SC.5 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
28, " 
18, " 


Promoted to Cuptaii . 
Promoted to Captaii . 
Promoted to Captaii . 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment as R. Q. M. 
Mustered out with regiment is Adjutant. 
Mustered out with regiment 
Mustered out with regiment 


Samuel Hal lev 
George W. Eol.v 
Daniel R Sh river 




Nelson Pimlam 


John D. Scott 
Rudolph Obrist 
^Ivah \ Maiik 


Alonzo F. Sims 


Clayton Rogers 
Thomas K. Scott 


Jan. 

Aug. 

Sept. 
Oct. 

Dec. 
Jan. 

April 
March 
Jan. 
April 
March 
April 
May- 
March 
July 
March 
April 
May 
Aug. 


28; 

28, 
31, 
5, IS* 1 
17, 
1^, 
24, 
2;>, 
3, 
11, 
14, 
S, 
1, 18*2 
28, 
11, 
23, 
11, 18(3 
24, 
2, 

is! 

2, 

12, 1864 

11, " 
11, " 
11, " 


Jan. 
Feb. 

March 

Jan. 
May- 
June 
Feb. 
April 

May 
June 
Sept. 

April 
May 
Aug. 


28, " 
28, " 
31, " 
11, 1862 
11, " 
H, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
11, " 
20, " 
20, " 
20, " 
28, " 
1, " 
24, " 
10, 1863 
24, " 
22, " 

28, ;; 

2fi| " 
1, " 

1, " 

12, 1864 

\l\ " 
11, " 
11, " 


Mustered out with regiment 
Mustered out with regiment 
Discharged per General Order No. 77. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant October 15, 1862. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned December 5, 1861. 
Out of service. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned July 13, 1863. 
Out of service. 
Out of service. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Out of service. 
Killed in action September 19, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Died July 22, 1864. 
Out of service. 
Commission returned. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Killed in action September 6, 1864. 
Declined promotion ; commission returned. 


Perry Gall 


Tl-oiiias S Davis 


John M. Higgins 
Robert L. Ramsey 


Elias A. llomsey 


John J. Gist, jr 


Milton C. Peters 


Win. B. Robv 


Martin V. B. Morrison 
George G. Winkler 
Chas R. Pomeroy 


David McCamell 
Walter B. MeXeil 


Henrv Harrison 
Win S. Baldwin 


Jacob Parrott 


Daniel A. Dorsey 
Win Reddirk 


Frederick Col bourn 
Joseph H. Cole 
Warren L. Johnson 
Francis McCampbell 
Win 11 Myers 






John E Svkes 


John Smith 





THIBTY-THIKD OHIO INFANTRY. 219 



THIRTY-THIRD OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE T II I R T Y - T II I R D O H I O was organized at Camp Morrow, Portsmouth, Ohio, 
during the latter part of the summer of 1861. It entered the service with an aggre 
gate of eight hundred and thirty-nine men. The Colonel (Joshua W. Sill) spared no 
pains to render the regiment perfect in drill and discipline, and its future efficiency was in a great 
measure due to him. Upon entering the Held it joined the forces of General Nelson, at Mays- 
ville, Kentucky, and accompanied that command in its march to repel an invasion of the Blue 
Grass Region, by the Rebel Colonel John S. Williams. This campaign lasted about sixty days, 
in which time the Rebels were driven to Pikeville, and into Virginia. Taking transports at 
Louisa, on the Big Sandy River, the regiment was landed at Louisville on the 1st of December, 
1861. It was there brigaded with the Tenth "Wisconsin, Second and Twenty-First Ohio, in Gen 
eral Buell s army, and marched with that army to Bacon Creek, Kentucky, where it remained, 
with General O. M. Mitchel as division commander, until February, 1862. While lying at 
Bacon Creek the regiment suffered severely from measles, small-pox, and camp diarrhea. 

On February 13th the regiment started with General Mitchel for Bowling Green, driving 
the enemy before them and occupying his works. On the 21st it marched to Nashville, and 
encamped in that city on the 26th of February. 

On March 18, 1862, the regiment, still under General O. M. Mitchel, advanced along the 
Chattanooga Railroad to Muri reesboro and Shelbyville, and thence to Huntsville, Alabama. 
After the occupation of Huntsville the regiment was on the move constantly, and, in the latter 
part of the summer, it advanced to Bridgeport. Here the Thirty-Third, with a small detach 
ment of cavalry, were left, in the month of August, to occupy Fort McCook, at the mouth of 
Battle Creek, while the main force marched back to intercept General Bragg s army. On the 
27th of August a detachment of the regiment, guarding a train which had been sent to Bridge 
port for forage, was attacked by a party of Rebel cavalry. The cavalry from the fort was sent 
to the relief of the infantry, and succeeded in driving off the Rebels, and in killing and captur 
ing some. The regiment lost one man killed. During this skirmish a Rebel battery opened on 
the fort, and for twelve hours the troops were exposed to a severe cannonade, without any op 
portunity to return the fire. At nightfall the fort was evacuated ; all the stores which could 
not be removed were destroyed, and the troops set out to join the main army at Decherd, Ten 
nessee. The night was fearfully dark, and the rain fell in torrents, but the march was accom 
plished in safety. 

From Decherd the regiment marched, with its brigade and division, to Nashville, and pass 
ing through that city joined the main army under General Buell, at Bowling Green. Louisville 
was reached on the morning of the 26th of September. On October 1st the pursuit of Bragg s 
Rebel army was again resumed the National forces marching out of Louisville on the Bards- 
town Turnpike. Nothing of moment occurred until Perryville was reached. The Thirty -Third 
Ohio went into this fight with four hundred muskets, and lost one hundred and twenty-nine men 
killed and wounded, twenty-five of whom were buried on the field. Colonel Oscar F. Moore 
(who had superseded Colonel Sill, appointed Brigadier-General) was severely wounded and fell 
into the hands of the enemy. Captains Ilibbs and Foster were also severely wounded. This 
was the first set battle in which the Thirty -Third Ohio had been engaged, and it performed its 
part so gallantly as to elicit strong commendations from its brigade and division commanders. 

The regiment participated in the pursuit of the enemy up to Crab Orchard, and then 
returned, by easy marches, to Nashville, Tennessee. During this time General Rosecrans hud 



220 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

superseded General Buell in the command of the Army of the Ohio, and on assuming command 
reorganized the whole army, and christened it the Army of the Cumberland. The Thirty-Third 
Ohio was placed in First Brigade, First Division, of General George H. Thomas s command. 

On December 26, 1862, the Thirty-Third Ohio moved out of Nashville, on the Nolin Turn 
pike, toward Murfrecsboro , with General A. M. McCook s column, in the division commanded 
by General L. H. Rousseau. In the first day s fight at Stone River, the regiment supported Loom- 
is s Michigan Battery, and rendered efficient service in checking the advance of the Rebels after 
they had broken through the National right. In this battle the regiment lost eight men killed 
and a number wounded. 

The National army lay at Murfreesboro until June 24, 1863, when it moved on Tullahoma, 
and made that difficult march to Chattanooga and vicinity. On the first day s march the enemy 
was met at Hoover s Gap, where a brisk fight ensued. The Thirty-Third Ohio was engaged in 
this affair, and lost four men wounded. The enemy was driven through the Gap and back toward 
Tullahoma, which place was abandoned by them on the 29th of June. 

About the 1st of September, 1863, the Chickamauga campaign opened. The Thirty-Third 
Ohio crossed the Tennessee River, just above Bridgeport, marched over Sand and Lookout 
Mountains, into the valley of Chickamauga, and took part in the battle of Chickamauga on the 
19th and 20th of September. It went into action with three hundred and forty-three men, and 
lost, in killed, wounded, and missing, one hundred and sixty-eight men. Major E. J. Ellis, of 
Manchester, Ohio, a gallant and beloved officer of the Thirty-Third Ohio, was killed in this 
battle. Captain (afterwards Colonel) Joseph Hinson also lost his right arm. 

The regiment fell back with the main army to Rossville and Chattanooga, and was cooped 
up in that beleaguered city until the 24th of November, when it participated in the battle of 
Lookout Mountain, by forming a junction with General Hooker s forces. In this affair the 
regiment lost heavily. It rejoined its division on the morning of the 25th of November, and 
took part in carrying Mission Ridge. It lost in this brilliant affair thirty-one men out of two 
hundred engaged. Lieutenant George W. Roby, of Bainbridge, Ohio, was wounded in this 
battle. The regiment followed the enemy to Taylor s Ridge, and at that place, on the 27th, had 
another fight, losing several men wounded. The day previous, at Graysville, it aided in the cap 
ture of five pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners. 

Returning to Chattanooga the regiment re-enlisted as veterans, and was sent to Ohio to enjoy 
its thirty-days furlough. 

On returning to the field the Thirty-Third Ohio reported at Chattanooga, and in May, 1864, 
joined General Sherman s forces on the Atlanta campaign. During that campaign it participated 
in the battles of Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Kenesaw Mountain, crossing 
of the Chattahoochie, Peachtree Creek, in the battles around Atlanta, and Jonesboro . At Resaca 
the regiment lost the following-named officers killed: Captain McKuin, of Pomeroy, Ohio; Lieu 
tenant Edgar Higbee, of Ross County, and Colonel James H. Montgomery, of GallipolLs. A 
number of other officers of the regiment were slightly wounded, and about fifty men killed and 
wounded. The aggregate number of officers and men killed and wounded in this campaign was 
about one hundred and seventy. The regiment was unfortunate in its loss of officers: Lieutenant 
Charles R. Pomeroy, of Pomeroy, was killed at Utoy Creek ; Colonel Montgomery and Major 
Benjamin F. Barger were severely wounded in the same battle; Lieutenant Campbell, of Galli- 
polis, was killed at Peachtree Creek ; Lieutenant John E. Sykes, of Kinnickinick, Ross County, 
Ohio, was killed at Jonesboro . 

The Thirty-Third Ohio followed Hood as far as Villanow, Georgia, in his mad movement 
toward Nashville, after which it accompanied General Sherman in his march to the sea and in 
the campaign through the Carolinas. At Bentonville, North Carolina, it suffered severely, pay 
ing there its last tribute to the cause of the Union. It then made the triumphant march through 
the Rebel capital to Washington City, and participated in the grand review. It was then taken 
to Louisville, Kentucky, ond mustered out of the service on the 12th of July, 1865. It was paid 
off and discharged at Camp Dennison. 



THIRTY-FOURTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



221 



34th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OF HANK. 


COM. ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 


ABRAHAM S. PIATT 
JOHN T. TOLAND 
F. E. FRANKLIN 

J. T. TOLAND 


Aug. 
May 
July 
Aug. 
May 
July 
Aug. 

May 
Oct. 

March 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Aug. 
March 
Jan. 
July 
Aug. 
Jan. 
July 
\uc 


2, 1S6I 
14, ISO:. 
18, 1853 
2. 1861 
14, 18i)i 
18, 1803 
11, 1864 
21, 1861 
14, 1802 
10, " 
21, 1804 
11, " 

30, " 

27, isr.i 

20, I.Sf.2 
11, " 
30, 
31, 1861 
16, 18 
*, " 

30 ^ 186-1 

30, 1801 

i:;, " 
u, " 

14 " 


Sept. 16, 1S61 
May 14, 1802 
Aug. 2;>, 1803 
Sept. 18, 1801 
May 14, 1862 
Aug. 25, 1863 
11, 1804 


Promoted to Brisadier-General. 
Killed July 18, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Killed July 21, 1.S64, at Winchester. 
Transf d to 30th O. V. I.; disch d Feb. 26, 05. 


DO 

Do 
Lt. Colonel.... 


]>0 


JOHN W SHAW 


Do 


LUTIIEU FUHNKY 


Major 
Do 
Do 
Do 


FKEEMAN E. FRANKLIN.... 
THOMAS W. RATHI;ONE 
JOHN W. .SHAW 


.May 14, 1801 
Nov. 14, " 
March 21, 1864 
Aug. 11, " 
Oct. 1, " 
Nov. 20, " 
Sept. 15, 18(1 
March 27, 181 2 
April 30, 
Oct. 7, 
Sept. 10, 1S( 1 
Ja i. 16, 18(2 
July 23, 
l>ec. 5, 
May 30, I $64 
A i g. 30, 1S01 
Sept. ID, " 
16, " 


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Resigned October 10, 1802. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Declined promotion. 
Mustered out at expiration of service. 
Mustered out. 
Commission returned January 28, 1862. 
Commission returned ; revoked. 
Resigned July 30, 1862. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
.M ustered out. 
Transferred to 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
Promoted to Major. 
Promoted to Maior. 
Re-d< r ned November 1 ISC 9 


Do 


8 R S \VFST 


Do. . 


CHAS. W. BOYD 


Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Do. 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 


BENJ. C. KlCKKIt 


JACOB Y. CANTWELI 
HKNKV SPII.LMAN 
\V. U. S. CLUIK 
JOHN II. AYI-.KS 
W. U. S. CI.AUK 
JOHN 11. AYF.HS 
WILSON V. COWAN 
( HAS A MiLLtoit 


.1. 1 SCH ILl.l.Vir 


May 

A u s 


G. W. COLI.U .K 
Thonuis \V. Kathbone 
J. W. Shaw 
\ustin T Mil T 


Captain 
Do 
Do 


Do 




Sept. 

May 

July 
Aug. 

Sept. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Doc. 

March 
A ug. 

Sept . 

A.ug. 


It), " 
16, " 
10, " 

> :; 

>! 

12, " 
11, 1802 
17, " 
ft, " 
! ., " 
1,- " 
10, " 
4, " 
4, " 
19, 1863 
2, 1804 
2, " 
11, " 
1, 1S62 
30, 1804 
30, " 
30, " 
. JO, " 
30, " 
30, " 
30, " 
13, 1861 
13, " 
14, " 
10, " 
16, " 
!6, " 
16, " 
16, " 
17, " 

6* 
12, " 

M, 1862 

1 :: 

.->, 

10, " 
10, " 

I .), " 

10, " 

1, " 

23, " 
23, |] 

2, IS64 

2, " 
2, " 

2, " 

2* " 


16, " 
16, 
16, " 
16, " 
16, " 
" 16, " 
16, " 
May 14, 1862 
Aug. 14, 
Oct. 7, 
Nov. 14, 
28, 
28, 
Dec. .HO, 
Feb. 10, 1863 
Ian. 8, 1.-6I 
March 2, " 
2, " 
Aug. 11, 
Nov. 28, 18 2 
Sept. 30, 18 1 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
16, 18 1 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
10, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
10, 
16, 
J ly 2U, 18 2 
\ lg. 14, 
I. 7, 
7, 
7, 
Nov. 14, 
28, 
2s, 

2a, | 

Feb. lit, 18 3 
M, 
iO, 
March 2, IS 4 
2, 
2, 
2, 
" 2, " 
" 2, " 


Promoted to Major. 
Discharged August 15, 1863. [of service. 
Prom, to Major; mustered out at expiration 
Resigned July 7, 1862. 
Discharged October 6, 1863. 
Resigned December 4, 1862. 
Resigned August 5, 1862. 
Died of wounds received September 10, 1362. 
Musteied out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out March 13, 1865. 
Promoted to Major. 
Declined and returned commission. 
M ustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Deceased. 
Discharged August 30, 1864. 
Promoted. 
Mustered out March 13, 1865. 
Promoted to Major 36th 0. V. T. 
Kill-d in action September )9, 1864. 
.Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain May 11, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. [rec d Sept. 10, 62. 
\pp. Capt. on Gen. Piatt s stall ; died of w nd* 
Promoted to Captain September 19, 1862. 
Killed September 10, 1862. 
Resigned April 23, 1862. 
Assistant Adjutant-General of Volunteers. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned July 25, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Discharged August 1, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain, 
designed September 29, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Honorabiv discharged June 14, 1864. 
Discharged September 1, 1864. 
Resigned January 23, 1863. 
Promoted lo Captain. 
Resigned January 8, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Discharged November 5, 1863. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Prisoner. 
Promoted to Captain, 


Do 
Do 
Do 
l>o 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Herman C. Evans 


Clias. G. Broad well 
James A. Anderson 


1 homas R. Smilev 
Henry C. Hatfield 
Frank B Ilelwi" . .. . 


Do 




Do 
Do 
Do 


Albert Nesbitt 
John Cutler 
( has. W. Boyd 


Do 




Do. 


Hiram Peck 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Robert 15. Underwood 
.ieorge W. McKay 
Lemuel E. Merry 
Alfred Butters 


Do 


John Cntl T . 


Do 
Do 


Bonj. C. llicker 
\sa B Carter 


Do 


James 1 . Donnally 


Do 


Do 




Do 


Frank A. Austin 


Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

&: 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 


Win. A. Harris 


H. C. Ilatheld 


Frank B. Helwig 
John Grace 
Hiram Peck 
Kthan A. Brown 
Albert Neabitt 
Samuel Mc Iutcheon 
Jeorge II. Hart 
K/.ra W. Clark 
John Cutler 
Chas. W.Bovd 
Richard Roe 
George W. McKay 


Sept. 

May 
Inly 
April 
Aug. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 
Nov. 
Doc. 
Ian. 

March 






John Wingett 
A 1 trod Butters 


A. 8. Frax ! 
)ani"S II. Taylor 


lames Shields 
Uenj. C. Kicker 
diver P. Gorton 
Robert B. l : nder\\o.,.l 
Albany Packliam 
Jeremiah Kngle 
Franklin G. Shaw 
Asa B. Carter 
John Q. A. Fullerton 
lames 1*. Donnally 
h rank Millward 
Isaac P. Grovi-r 



222 



OHIO IN THE WAK. 



Nelson W. Hayes 

Chas. E. Callahan 

Frank Milhvard 

Nelson W. Hayes 

John W. Cartwriglit 

Frank A. Austin 

Wni. A. Harris 

Isaac X. Anderson 

Thomas H. B. Hopkins 

Nathan P. Marv.-ll 

James Smith 

George W. McKay 

Win. H. Carpenter 

Thomas Lawler 

Lemuel E. Merry 

Henry II. Anderson 

A. IS. Fiazer 

Alfred Butters 

Robert B. Underwood 

Hubert C. Peters 

John Wingett 

James Shields 

Benj. C. Kicker 

Oliver I . Gorton 

James H. Taylor 

Jeremiah Bugle 

Albany Pack ham 

Franklin G. Shaw 

Asa B. Carter 

James (. otter 

John Q. A. Fullerton 

James P. Donnally 

Frank Mill ward 

Isaac P. Grover 

Xels.m W. Hayes 

Chas. E. Callahan 

Benj. T. Brnce 

John L. Branson 

Frank A. Austin 

John W. Cartwright 

Isaiah C. Lindsey 

\Vm. C. Sartrent 

Wm. A. Harris 

Isaac N. Anderson 

Samuel A. Derr 

Nathan P. Marvell 

James Smith 

Samuel Jordan 

Frederick Bill man 

James K. Agnew 

George Watt 

Morton L. Hawkins 

John Jordan . 

Andrew J. Temple 
Chas. A. Metz 



DATE OF RANK. 



Aug. 

March 

Aug. 

Sept. 



Nov. 
Aug. 



Sept 



Feb. 

May 

July 

April 

Aug. 

Oct. 
Sept, 



11, 1864 
Hi 
2, 
11. 
30, 

"o 1 

so! 

30, 



13, 1 b 

13, 

14, 

16, 

16, 

16. 

16, 

2, 

6, 
12, 
19, 1 h2 



Oct. 

Nov. 
Oct. 
Dec. 

J an . 



10, 

1, 
10, 

3, 

8, 1 3 
22, 

2, 1 



March 

Jan. 

Oct. 29, 1 3 

31 arch 1.5, 1 

1.5, 

1.5, 

15, 

15, 



Sept. 



Nov. 



Aug. 

March 

Aug. 

Sept. 



Nov. 



Sept. 
Dec. 



Feb. 
July 
A ug, 

Oct. 



COM. ISSUED. 



Nov. 
Dec. 



Feb. 
March 



Sept. 



Nov. 



11, 1864 

11, " 

ll , " 

30, " 

30, " 

30, " 

30, " 

30, " 

26, " 

26, " 

16, 1S61 

12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
1*, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
12, " 
19, 1862 
29, " 
14, " 

3, " 

7, " 

7, " 

2,5, " 

28, " 

16, " 

10, " 

16, " 

16, " 

16, " 

10, 1863 

10, " 

10, " 

2, 1864 

9, " 



15, 
1.5, 
15, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 
30, 

S; 

26, 
26, 



Prisoner. 

Declined promotion. 

Discharged as I d Lieutenant Dec. 19, 1864. 

Mustered out March 2.5, 186.5. 

Died of wounds November 17, 1864. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Promoted to Captain. 

Transferred to 3iith Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

Transferred to 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

Mustered out April 4, 1865. 

Transferred to 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Pronioted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned January 2-8, ls62. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Resigned December 3, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Honorably discharged October 9, 1862. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Pronioted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out. 

Discharged Septembers, 1863. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Mustered out. 

Mustered out, 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Pronioted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Deceased. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 

Declined promotion ; commission returned. 

Mustered out. 

Transferred to 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

Mustered out. 

Mustered out. 

Mustered out. 

Mustered out. 

Mustered out. 



THIRTY-FOURTH OHIO INFANTRY. 223 



THIRTY-FOURTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 



THIS regiment was organized at Camp Lucas, Clermont County, Ohio, during the months 
of July and August, 1861; the first detachment entering camp July 15th, and the first 
regular companies, under Captains Broad well and Evans, July 21st. On the morning 
of September 1st it moved to Camp Dennison, and was there prepared for the field, adopting as 
its uniform (a license allowable at that early period of the war) a light blue Zouave dress. In 
compliment to their Colonel, the name of " Piatt Zouaves " was adopted. 

The regiment left Camp Dennison on the 15th of September, 1861, for Western Virginia, 
with full ranks, and arrived at Camp Enyart, on the Kanawha River, on the 20th of the same 
month. On the 25th it fought its first battle in a gap near Chapmanville, Logan County, Virginia, 
whipping a Virginia regiment, inflicting considerable loss to the Rebels in men, and badly wound 
ing their commander, Colonel Davis. The loss of the Thirty-Fourth was one killed and eight 
wounded. During the remainder of the autumn and winter the regiment was engaged in the 
arduous duty of guarding the rear of General Rosecrans s army, and the counties of Cabell, Put 
nam, Mason, Wayne, and Logan were kept pretty free from guerillas by continual scouting. 

In March, 1862, the Thirty-Fourth was ordered to Gauley Bridge to join General Cox 
in his demonstration on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. The regiment participated in 
the battle of Princeton, on the 17th and 18th of May, losing several men. Lieutenants Peck 
and Peters were wounded, and Captain O. P. Evans taken prisoner. Humphrey Marshall com 
manded the Rebels. 

When General Cox was ordered to join General McClellan, in August, 1862, there were six 
regiments left to guard the Kanawha Valley. The Thirty-Fourth and Thirty-Seventh held the 
outpost at Fayetteville, where, on the morning of September 10th, they were attacked by a Rebel 
force, under General Loring, ten thousand strong. With the aid of admirable breastworks, pre 
viously constructed by General Scammon, two ten-pound brass field pieces and four six-pound 
mountain howitzers, the position was held until midnight, when the place was evacuated. Part 
of the time the Thirty-Fourth fought in the open field, and repeatedly charged on the enemy. 
Its loss was necessarily heavy. Of six companies engaged (the other four, under Major Frank 
lin, being on a scout) the loss was one hundred and thirty, or fully one-third. One-half of the 
officers were either killed or wounded. Cutting their way out under a heavy fire, the National 
troops fell back towards the Kanawha river, made a stand at Cotton Mountain the next day, 
and at Charleston on the 12th, where a severe engagement took place. From this point the 
entire National force fell back to Point Pleasant, leaving the entire valley in the hands of the 
Rebels. In October General Cox returned with his command, when another advance was made, 
and the valley regained. 

From this time until May, 1863, nothing of momen-t occurred to vary the monotony of garri 
son duty. During May the regiment was furnished with horses and transformed into " Mounted 
Rifles." 

On the 13th of July, 1863, an expedition, consisting of the Thirty-Fourth, two companies 
of the First, and seven companies of the Second Virginia Cavalry, under command of Colonel 
Toland, made a demonstration on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, striking it, on the even 
ing of the 18th, at Wytheville. A desperate fight ensued, the enemy occupying the houses, barns, 
yards, etc., on a slight elevation to the rear of the town. About dark the National forces sue- 



224 OHIO IN THE WAE. 

ceeded in capturing the enemy s artillery, and driving him in all directions. Captain Delany, 
commanding First Virginia, was killed, and Colonel Powell, Second Virginia, badly wounded. 
The Thirty-Fourth Ohio lost four killed, including Colonel Toland, thirteen wounded and thirty- 
three missing. (Colonel Toland was shot from a window of a house in his immediate vicinity, 
while seated on his horse, engaged in giving orders, surrounded by a few of his staff. The ball 
passed through his left breast. The Colonel did not fall from his horse, but caught the mane 
with his right hand, when his Orderly, who was about fifty yards distant from him, ran and 
caught him before he had time to reach the ground. With his last breath he requested that hia 
horse and sword be sent to his mother.) 

The brigade left Camp Piatt with nearly one thousand men ; marched six hundred and 
fifty-two miles in eleven days, traversing some of the highest mountains in West Virginia, cap 
turing over two hundred and fifty horses and three hundred and sixty prisoners, two pieces of 
artillery, and a large amount of commissary stores ; destroyed between three and five thousand 
Btand of arms, a bridge of importance, and partially burned one of the wealthiest cities in 
Virginia. 

Upon the fall of Colonel Toland, the command devolved upon Lieutenant-Colonel Franklin, 
who decided on a retrograde movement. This he found it difficult to execute, from the fact that 
the Rebel General McCausland had blockaded the roads in the most effectual manner. For sev 
eral days the command was moving in the mountains, destitute of food for themselves or fodder 
for their horses, and continually harassed by Rebel cavalry. On the day previous to the arrival 
of the regiment at Wytheville, company C, acting as rear-guard, was attacked by a superior force 
of Rebel cavalry. A number was killed and wounded, and Captain Cutter and fifteen men were 
taken prisoners. 

Several expeditions, under General Duffie (who had assumed command of the Kanawha 
cavalry), to Lewisburg and vicinity, completed this year s campaign. 

In January, 1864, about two-thirds of the regiment re-enlisted as veterans. On the 29th of 
April, 1864, the regiment was divided in two detachments. The mounted portion was to operate 
with the cavalry, under General Averill; the dismounted, with the Thirty-Sixth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, in General Crook s division of infantry. 

On the 1st of May, 1864, the second expedition for the destruction of the Virginia and Ten 
nessee Railroad left Charleston. On the 9th the cavalry arrived at Wytheville, encountered the 
Rebels under General Morgan, were repulsed, and compelled to fall back, with considerable loss. 
The infantry, under General Crook, was more successful. On the same day that Averill was 
defeated, Crook achieved a solid victory over General Jenkins at Cloyd Mountain, near Dublin 
Depot, which was captured the same evening. On the day following the enemy was again 
encountered and defeated at the railroad bridge over New River, and the bridge totally destroyed. 
From this point the command returned to Meadow Bluffs, crossing Salt Pond and Peter s Moun 
tains and the Greenbrier River, arriving at their destination on the 19th of May, completing a 
distance of four hundred miles marched during the month. 

From Meadow Bluffs the Thirty-Fourth started to join General Plunter, at Staunton, in the 
Shenandoah Valley, passing through White Sulphur Springs, Callahan s Stand, and crossing 
Panther Gap Mountain, where a skirmish ensued. On the 5th of June the regiment reached 
Goshen, on the Virginia Central Railroad, and skirmished with a body of cavalry at Cow Pas 
ture River. The day after the Rebels were met at Buffalo Gap, in a position secure from direct 
attack, but General Hayes s brigade succeeded in flanking and driving them out of it. 

Staunton was reached on the 8th of June, where the Thirty-Fourth made its final prepara 
tions to join General Hunter on his disastrous raid to Lynchburg. General Plunter, now re- 
enforced by Generals Crook, Averill, and Duffie, left Staunton on the 9th, and, passing through 
Brownsburg, reached Lexington on the llth. The evening of the 14th found the regiment at 
Buckhannon, on the James River, at which point a few shots were exchanged with a small Rebel 
force that had been driven out of Lexington. Crossing the Blue Ridge, near the Peaks of Otter, 
the town of Liberty was reached on the 16th, when another skirmish occurred. From this point 



THIRTY-FOURTH OHIO INFANTRY. 225 

General Crook s command, with whom the dismounted members of the Thirty -Fourth were serv 
ing, was sent on a flanking expedition across the James, for the purpose of attacking Lynchburg 
in the rear, the cavalry, on the left, to make a diversion in their favor. The attack was made 
late in the afternoon of the 18th of June, was partly successful, and, in the opinion of the 
Thirty-Fourth, would have been entirely so had General Crook been allowed to occupy the city 
that night, according to his wish, but orders from his superior officer forbade it. The enemy were 
re-enforced that night by about twenty thousand men from the vicinity of Richmond, under the 
command of General Early, which, of course, so strengthened the city that it was impossible, 
with the sm\all and illy-appointed force under General Hunter, to cope with the Rebels. 

The situation was fully developed early the next morning by a fierce cannonade from the 
Rebels, which was promptly replied to by the National forces. In the afternoon an engagement 
occurred, in which the Thirty-Fourth suffered severely. The retreat of the National forces com 
menced at dark on the 19th of June. The rear being heavily pressed by the pursuing enemy, 
the second skirmish occurred at Liberty. At Salem, on the 21st, while the artillery of Hunter s 
command was passing through a narrow defile, totally unsupported, a party of Rebels made a 
sudden descent from the hills, and, dispersing the drivers and gunners, commenced the work of 
destruction by shooting horses, cutting spokes and harness, and blowing up caissons. The 
mounted portion of the Thirty-Fourth, being a few miles in the rear, hurried to the scene of 
action, dismounted, and, with Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw as their leader, encountered the Rebels. 
After a sharp fight the Rebels were driven off and the artillery regained. 

The retreat was continued. Big and Little Sewell Mountains were crossed, and Charleston 
reached on the 1st of July, where the exhausted, ragged, and starved troops were permitted to 
rest. Thus ended this most disastrous expedition. The constant skirmishing, the starved bodies, 
and blistered feet of those who participated in it, made " Hunter s retreat from Lynchburg " an 
event long to be remembered. 

The Thirty-Fourth lay at Charleston on the 10th of July, when it embarked on transports 
for Parkersburg. (A day or two previous to this move the whole regiment was dismounted and 
horses and equipments turned over to the cavalry.) From Parkersburg the regiment moved by 
rail to Martinsburg, arriving there on the 14th of July, 1864. 

The regiment was now in the Shenandoah Valley. On the 20th of July, while General 
Crook, with his main force and the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps, was pressing Early back on 
Winchester, General Duval s brigade, of which the Thirty-Fourth was a part, attempted to occupy 
the place in advance of the Rebels, by a forced march from Martinsburg. Early, anticipating the 
movement, had sent forward his old division, under General Ramseur, to check it. The National 
force, only twelve hundred strong, met and attacked the Rebels two miles from Winchester, 
completely routing them, capturing their artillery, and killing and wounding all their brigade 
commanders. The loss of the Thirty-Fourth was ten killed and twenty wounded. Four days 
later occurred the fourth battle of Winchester, in which General Early, taking advantage of the 
absence of the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps, overwhelmed General Crook the latter, however, 
effecting an orderly retreat, with the loss of only a few wagons. In this battle General Duval s 
brigade had the honor of bringing up the rear, and the Thirty-Fourth suffered severely, losing 
their commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw, a cool, determined soldier, and Christian. He was 
struck in the abdomen by a musket-ball, and was borne from the field by a few faithful men of 
his regiment, placed in an ambulance, and carried eleven miles distant, to a place called Bunker 
Hill, where he died. His last words were, " Welcome, welcome death !" Captain G. W. McKay 
was wounded about the same time in the leg, and would have fallen into the hands of the enemy 
but for the heroic devotion of some of his men, who carried him on a litter fifteen miles to Sandy 
Hook, Maryland, where he died. 

The command of the regiment devolved upon Captain S. R. S. West, who fully sustained his 
reputation as a brave and gallant officer. The next day, July 25th, another stand was made at 
Martinsburg, the Thirty-Fourth being the last regiment to leave the field, which it did under a 
galling fire. 

VOL. 1115. 



226 OHIO IN THE WAK. 

The time of the regiment between the 25th of July and the 3d of September was occupied aa 
follows: July 26th, forded the Potomac at Williamsport ; 27th, marched to Sandy Hook, Mary 
land, opposite Harper s Ferry ; 28th, crossed the Potomac at Halltown ; 30th, recrossed to Sandy 
Hook; 31st, marched through Middletown toward Pennsylvania State line; August 1st, continued 
the march to Wolfville, Maryland ; 3d, returned by same road to Frederick City, Maryland, and 
encamped on the Monocacy ; 6th, returned to Harper s Ferry ; 8th recrossed the Potomac and 
moved in the direction of Halltown; 10th, reached Berryville, Virginia; llth, marched in line 
of battle in the direction of Front Royal heavy skirmishing with Early, who was falling back 
on Fisher s Hill ; 12th, reached Cedar Creek, found the enemy had burned the bridge, and wan 
intrenched on the south bank of the stream. The Thirty-Fourth lay here until the evening of 
the 17th (skirmishing heavily in the meantime). It then fell back, marching all night, passing 
through Winchester, and camping at Berryville early next morning. The 20th of August found 
the Thirty-Fourth at Charlestown, with the enemy close in its rear. In the expectation of an 
attack, breastworks were thrown up ; but, after waiting in vain until ten o clock at night, the regi 
ment fell back to Halltown. The enemy still followed, and, taking a position in the immediate 
front of the regiment, heavy skirmishing ensued until the 27th, when they withdrew to demon 
strate on the upper Potomac. On the day following the Thirty-Fourth again occupied Charles- 
town, where the regimental officers were busily engaged making up the necessary papers for the 
discharge of the non-veterans, who, on the morning of the 3d of September, proceeded to Colum 
bus, Ohio, in charge of Captain West. 

During the few months previous to this time the Thirtv-Fourth had been largely re-enforced 
by new recruits. Counting the veterans and the men of 1862, it still numbered between four and 
five hundred men, present and absent. (On the evening of the day on which the non-veterans 
left, the regiment participated in the battle of Berryville. The non-veterans were near enough to 
hear the booming of cannon.) 

The enemy fell back to Winchester and Bunker Hill. The Thirty-Fourth marched to Sum 
mit Point, and lay in camp until the morning of the 19th of September, the day on which occurred 
Sheridan s famous battle of Winchester, it being the third time the regiment had fought over 
nearly the same ground. It suffered terribly that day, the color-guard having no less than six 
men, in quick succession, killed and wounded while carrying the flag. It was finallv brought 
through safe by George Rynals, of company A. All know the result of that glorious battle, and 
remember Sheridan s celebrated dispatch, commencing: "I am moving up the Valley to-night!" 
In accordance with this announcement, the next evening found the regiment at Cedar Creek, 
where it lay until the 22d, when occurred the battle of Fisher s Hill. Here again, by the excel 
lent management of General George Crook, the enemy was successfully flanked, which resulted 
in his total rout and the capture of all his artillery. The loss of the Thirty-Fourth in the last 
two engagements was sixty-one killed. 

The National forces followed the retreating and demoralized enemy to Harrisonburg, where 
they lay until the 6th of October. In the meantime the cavalry were busily engaged in burning 
barns filled with grain, driving in stock of all kinds, and otherwise rendering the Valley unten 
able as a base of supplies, and literally fulfilling Grant s order to Sheridan, to render it so deso 
late and provisionless that "a crow, in passing over it, would be compelled to carry his rations 
with him." By the 6th the work of devastation was completed, and the National army again 
fell back to Cedar Creek ; while the enemy, following at a respectful distance, once more resumed 
his old position at Fisher s Hill. 

Of General Early s desperate attempt to regain his lost laurels on the 19th of October, and 
of his partial success on the morning of "Sheridan s Ride" to the scene of action, and the irre 
trievable disaster of the Rebels in the afternoon, much has been said and sung. The brunt of the 
morning s surprise and attack fell on the left flank, composed of General Crook s corps, which, 
with the Nineteenth Corps occupying the center of the line, was badly shattered. The Sixth 
Corps, on the right, had time to fall back in good order. The troops were rallied near Middle- 



THIRTY-FOURTH OHIO INFANTRY. 227 

town, from whence the final advance was made, which swept everything before it. It is sufficient 
to say that the day was won. 

The evening before the battle the regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L. Fur- 
ney, was sent on picket. In the morning, before dawn, when the surprise occurred, the Colonel 
and eighteen of his men were taken prisoners. The Colonel escaped at Mount Jackson, and 
joined his command a few days thereafter. The loss of the Thirty-Fourth in this affair was two 
killed, twelve wounded, and eighteen prisoners. From this time until the latter part of December, 
1864, the regiment lay in the neighborhood of Kernstown, when it marched to Opequan Crossing, 
and from thence to Martinsburg. 

On the evening of the 22d of December, as the regiment was leaving Martinsburg, on its way 
to Webster, by rail, the train on which it was being transported came in collision with one loaded 
with coal, killing two men and wounding fourteen. It reached Webster on the 25th and Beverly 
on the 28th. 

On the llth of January, 1865, the post of Beverly, garrisoned by the Thirty-Fourth, which, 
by this time, was reduced to three hundred men present, for duty, and the dismounted portion of 
the Eighth Ohio Cavalry, was attacked by the enemy, under command of General Rosser. So 
secret and sudden was the attack no alarm whatever being given until the enemy were in the 
quarters that resistance was out of the question, and nearly every man was at one time a prisoner, 
though subsequently a great many escaped, favored by the darkness and intense excitement of the 
occasion. Colonel Youart, of the Eighth, commanding post, and Colonel Furney, were botli 
captured, but afterward escaped. The survivors of this most unfortunate and disgraceful affair 
fell back to Philippi, and from thence were ordered to Cumberland, Maryland, where they were 
consolidated with the Thirty-Sixth Ohio, (General Crook s old regiment), commanded by Colonel 
H. F. Duval. The union of the separate organizations dates from the 22d of February, 1865, in 
which the old Thirty-Fourth loses its identity the coalition being known as the Thirty-Sixth 
Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



228 



OHIO IN THE WAR. 



35th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAMK. 


DATE OF RANK. 


COM. 


ISSUED. 


REMARKS. 


Colonel 

Lt. Colonel.... 
Do 


FERD. VAXDERVEER.... 
CHARLES L 1 II LONG 


July 

Sept. 
Nov. 
Aug. 

Nov. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Aug. 

Sopt. 


26, 1861 

t(5, 8(53 
29, 861 
13, 8(53 
7, 861 
1, 863 
21, !>6l 
15, 862 
13, " 
23, 18(51 
13, 1862 
5, 1861 
15, " 
20, " 
26, " 
26, " 
1, 


July 
Aug. 
July 
Feb. 
July 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Aug. 

Feb. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Feb. 


26, 18*51 

20, 1863 
4, 1862 
20, 1863 
15, 1S61 
25, 1864 
21, 1861 
29, 1862 
16, 18(53 
30, 1861 
20, 18(52 
5, 
5, 
5, " 
5, " 
5, " 
5, " 
5, " 


Brig. Gen. of Vols. and Brvt. Maj. Gen. 
Resigned July 13 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Resigned November 2, 1863. 
Resigned August 8, 1862 ; disability. 
Resigned August 6, 1862. 
Promoted to Surgeon ; resigned June 18, 1S64. 
Mustered out September 27, 1864. 
Resigned Xovember 19, 1862. 
Resigned February 19, 1863. 
Resigned June 6, 1862. 
Promoted to Major. 
Died August 10, 1863. 
Dismissed August 12, 1863. 
Resigned October 24, 1862. 
Died Xovember 24, 1803. 
Killed September 19, 18(53. 


HENRY V. X. BOYNTON 
HKNRY V X BOYNTON 


Do 
Surgeon 
Do 
Ass t Surgeon 
Do. 
Do. 
Chaplain 
Do 
Captain 

DO! !!!!!! 

Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


JOSEPH L. BUDD 
PERKINS A. GORDON 
FRANCIS D. MORRIS 
FRANCIS D. MOKRI* 


A. H. LAXDIS 
JOHN WOOD 
JOSHUA C. HOHI.KTT 


Joseph L. Budd 
John S. Earhart 
Nathaniel Kei-dor 
Michael S. Gunckle 
David M. Gans 
Oliver H. Parshall 


Do 

DO! ..!!.!!! 

Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 


Samuel L Hommedieu 
Henry Mallory 
Andrew J. Lewis 
Ransford Smith 
Samuel Martindaie 
Jonathan Heninger 


Feb. 
Juno 
Oct. 
Feb. 
Julv 
March 


16, " 
17, 18(52 
6, " 
24, " 
18, 1863 
13, " 
19, 1864 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 


March 
June 
July 
April 
Aug. 
March 


:>, i 

20, " 

24, " 
12, 1863 
28, " 
1, " 
19, 1864 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 


Mustered out with regiment 
Resigned February 17, 1862. 
Resigned Januarv 4, 1864. 
Honorably discharged Feb. 18, 1863. [21, 63. 
Dismissed July 26, (53; revoked; hon. dis. Aug. 
Resigned September 20, 1864. [20, 1864. 
Killed at battle of Peach-tree Creek, Ga., July 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out March 11, 1865. 

Declined promotion. 
Mustered out with regiment. [Sep. 13, 63. 
Died Oct. 63, from wounds at Chickamauga, 

Resigned September 18, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain June 6, 1802. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned February 12, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Resigned Novembers, 1862. 
romoted to Captain. 
Vomoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain, 
lesigned January 30, 1863. 
romoted to Captain. 
> romoted to Captain. 
Declined promotion. 
Killed September 20, 1863. 
Promoted to Captain. 
On detached service. 
Promoted to Captain. 
Mustered out witli regiment. 
Resicned as 2d Lieutenant. 
On detached service. 

Deceased. 

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant. 
Absent on fur.; wound, at Mis. Rid. Nov. 23, 63. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do. 


John G. Vanderveer 
Edward Cottingham 
Win M C Steelc 


Philip Rothenbush 
Theodore D. Mather 


James H Bone 


Aug. 

Sept. 

Feb. 
June 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Julv 
Feb. 

March 

S,-pt. 
Juno 
Aug. 


19, " 
12, 1861 
14, ^ 

i " 
15, " 
26, 
26, ( | 

5, " 

17, 1862 
6, " 
24, " 
30, " 
12, " 
1, 1863 
13, " 
18, " 
20, " 
19, 18-54 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
12, 18(51 
8, 1864 
9, 1861 
15, " 
26, " 


May 

June 
Feb. 

May 
June 
Jan. 
Feb. 
April 
June 
Aug 

"Sept. 
May 

Juno 
Feb. 


19, " 

6, 

4* 1 62 
4, 
4, 
4. 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
1, 

12, i a 

19, " 
22 " 
To, " 
1, " 
S, " 
26, " 
19, 18^4 
19, " 
19, " 
19, " 
19, 
19, 
19, 
19, 
19, 
19, 
6, " 
8, " 
4, 1862 
4, |] 


Do 
Do 
1st Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

fc 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
2d Lieutenant 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Joel K. DeardortT 
Frederick W.Keil 
George B. Wright 
John G. Vanderveer 


Ransford Smith 
Lewis F. Dougherty 


Wm. C. Dine 
Samuel Martindaie 
Edward Cottingham 
Joseph C. Thomas 
Wm. M. C. Steele 
Andrew J. Lewis 
Philip Rothenbush 
Wm. II. Eacott 
Theodore D. Mather 
Jonathan lleninger 


Thomas 51. Ilarlan 


Julian R Fitch 


Fred Tick W Ki-il 


L P Thompson 


.John Adams 
I F S \nd -r 


David W. Schaetfer 


Robert B. Davidson 




James Saliine 
Ben.j. F. Miller 
Richard Ford 


James E. Harris 

Lewis La n "bright 
Daniel Stiles 


Wm. H. E:cott 
James H. Bone 
Julian R. Fitch 


L. P. Thompson 
Thomas M. Ilarlan 
George F. Earheart 
Wm. Andrew 


Sept. 
June 


1, " 
,5 ( " 

7, " 
15, " 
fi, " 


June 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
April 

Juno 
Aug. 
Sept. 
May 


4! " 
4, " 
4, " 
24, " 
25, " 
19, " 
12, 1863 
19, " 
27, " 
22, " 
10, " 
1, " 
26, " 
6, 1864 


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Resigned October 14, 1862. 
Resigned March 14, 1863. 
Resigned June 20, 1863. [2.1 Lieut. 
Promoted to 1st Lt.; hon. dis. May 28, 1864, ae 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out July 31, 1863. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 


Joseph S. Claypoole 


Joseph F. Saunders 
David W Schaeffer 


Nov. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
April 
Feb. 
Jan 
July 
Aug. 
Oct. 


24| " 

20, " 
27, 1863 
12, " 
1, " 
13, " 
20. " 
8, 1861 


Samuel L. Houser 
John X Strode 


Robert B. Davidson 




Benj F Miller 


David Stiles 





THIRTY-FIFTH OHIO INFANTRY. 229 



THIRTY-FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



THE THIRTY-FIFTH OHIO INFANTRY was organized at Hamilton, Ohio, 
during the months of August and September, 1861. Companies A and F were recruited 
in Warren County, II in Montgomery, E and part of G in Preble, and the others in 
Butler County. 

The regiment was composed mostly of young and intelligent men. When organized, it 
numbered less than nine hundred, rank and file. 

On the 26th of September, 1861, the regiment broke camp at Hamilton, and moved to Cov- 
ington, Kentucky, and on the same night, under orders from General O. M. Mitchel, took a train 
on the Kentucky Central Railroad, and, placing parties at all the bridges along the road through 
Harrison and Bourbon Counties, made the head-quarters of the regiment at Cynthiana. It was 
at this time apprehended that the Rebels would burn these bridges before troops could reach 
them ; but, by seizing the telegraph offices at every point on the way, the movement was a com 
plete surprise, and entirely unsuspected until guards had possession of every bridge. 

Afterward the regiment was removed to Paris, where it remained until the first days of 
December, when it marched to Somerset, and reported for duty to Brigadier-General Schoepff. 

At the battle of Mill Springs they were not actively engaged, having been ordered by Gen 
eral Thomas to remain at Somerset. Here they were brigaded with the Eighteenth Regulars, 
Ninth Ohio, and Second Minnesota, under the command of Brigadier-General Robert L. McCook, 
remaining with the last two regiments during their whole term of service. This was one of the 
brigades long composing General George II. Thomas s division. After the battle of Mill Springs 
the regiment marched to Louisville, and thence took steamer to Nashville. Soon after, Buell 
having organized the Army of the Ohio, they marched to Pittsburg Landing. Thomas s division 
being the rear-guard, did not get up in time for tke fight at Pittsburg Landing. 

The Thirty-Fifth participated in some of the skirmishes during the siege of Corinth, and 
was among the first to enter the works at that place. Afterward they marched to Tuscumbia, 
Alabama, and about the last of July, 1862, to Winchester, Tennessee. It was on this last march 
that General McCook was killed by Rebel guerrillas, near New Market. 

Shortly after, commenced that memorable race between Buell and Bragg, the goal being 
Louisville. From Nashville northward the regiment made about twenty-eight miles per day. 
In the movement on Bragg, the fight at Perryville, and the pursuit to Crab Orchard, they bore an 
honorable part. After Buell had been superseded by Rosecrans, the division, then commanded 
by General Speed S. Fry, marched to Bowling Green, and thence to a camp near Gallatin, Ten 
nessee. In February, 1863, Colonel Vanderveer was assigned to the command of the brigade, 
and Lieutenant-Colonel Long assumed command of the regiment. All through the campaign, 
which began at Murfreesboro and ended at Chattanooga, the Thirty-Fifth was in the front of the 
marching and fighting. In July of that year Lieutenant-Colonel Long resigned, and Major 
Boynton was promoted to the vacancy, Captain Budd receiving the Majority. From this time until 
it quit the service the regiment was under Colonel Boynton s command when he was able for duty. 

On the first day of the fight at Chickamauga, the Thirty-Fifth and the other regiments com 
posing Colonel Vanderveer s brigade were stationed on the extreme left of our line, where they 
engaged, and, after several hours of a fair, stand-up fight, repulsed and beat back three several 
attacks of Hood s division of Longstreet s corps, the elite of the Rebel army. On the next day, 
September 20th, they were again brought early into action, and, with the rest of the brigade, 



230 OHIO IN THE WAR. 

made a charge upon Breckinridge s division, which at that time had passed entirely around the 
left of our fortified line. The conflict, like that of the previous day, was severe and desperate, 
in the open field, and without any protection. Here was presented the uncommon spectacle of 
two armies charging each other at the same instant. That of the enemy was disorderly and 
with but little attention to discipline, while our men moved as if on drill, and under complete 
control. The brigade had been moving through the woods in two lines, the first composed of the 
Second Minnesota and Eighty- Seventh Indiana ; the second, of the Thirty-Fifth and Ninth Ohio. 
Suddenly emerging into an open field, they found themselves exposed to a murderous fire from 
artillery and musketry, under which they changed front, and in pursuance of orders laid flat 
upon the ground. The enemy were then at about one hundred and fifty yards distance, and 
charging on a run. When the distance was decreased to seventy-five yards, the first line rose and 
delivered their fire. Immediately the order was given : " Thirty-Fifth and Ninth, pass lines to 
the front ! Brigade, charge!" The order was executed promptly, and the Rebel line hurled 
back for almost half a mile at a double-quick, finally making a stand in the woods, where they 
were protected by their reserves. For more than an hour an obstinate contest was kept up, most 
effectually ending the attempt to flank the National line upon the left, When the order was 
given to return to the position occupied by the brigade previous to the charge, it was done in 
order, by passing lines to the rear, eacli regiment delivering its fire as it retired. 

At half-past two on that day the brigade was reported for duty to General Thomas, who was 
then holding a ridge to the rear and right of the line of the morning. Here the Thirty-Fifth 
was placed in the front line, where it built a slight work of wood and stone less than a foot in 
height. Behind this it remained until the last enemy had retired, repelling repeated charges of 
the most formidable and desperate character. Line after line of fresh troops of Rebels were 
sent to the attack, always meeting the same reception, always beaten and crushed. Late in the 
day anxious inquiry was made for ammunition, but the wagons had been ordered to Chattanooga. 
Then men and officers could be seen searching the cartridge-boxes of the dead and wounded ; 
and finally, when the brigade commander ordered them to hold their position with the bayonet, 
these heroes laughed, and promised to stay there. When night came the Thirty-Fifth was 
formed on and facing the left of the line, and when it was too dark to recognize friend from foe, 
a force of the enemy appeared before them. Those who had ammunition fired, and the enemy 
precipitately retreated. These were the last shots fired on the battle-field of Chickamauga by 
friend or foe. Not a single musket was heardjifterward; and the whole army having marched 
on the road toward Rossville, Yanderveer s brigade, the last to leave the field, under orders from 
General Thomas, followed. 

In the two days fight at Chickamauga, the Thirty-Fifth Ohio lost just fifty per cent, of 
those engaged. Scarcely a man was taken by the enemy they were killed or wounded. Colonel 
Boynton was conspicuous during the whole fight for his gallantry and the skill with which he 
managed his men ; and the regiment was highly commended in the reports of that action. 

During the fall of 1863 they lay with the rest of the army at Chattanooga, and frequently 
engaged in skirmishes before that place. They were on the front line at Mission Ridge, and 
were among the first to reach the enemy s works on the crest, from which they drove the Rebel 
force and captured three pieces of artillery. Early in the fight Colonel Boynton was severely 
wounded while leading his men up the height, when the command devolved upon Major Budd. 
Next morning the enemy was pursued to Ringgold, Georgia. 

In February, 1864, the regiment was engaged in the first battle at Buzzard s Roost, near Dai- 
ton, after which they were stationed at Ringgold until the beginning of the Atlanta campaign. 
They were with Sherman from the initiation of this movement until the expiration of their term 
of service, which occurred while lying before Atlanta. They were engaged at Daltori, Resaca, 
Pine Mountain, Kenesaw, Peachtree Creek, and several other of the fights of that bloody contest. 

The Thirty-Fifth was mustered out in August, 1864, at Chattanooga. 

In their term of three years the regiment never turned its back upon the enemy, and was 
never driven from a field. 



THIRTY-SIXTH OHIO INFANTRY. 



231 



36th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS SERVICE. 



RANK. 


NAME. 


DATE OK HANK 


COM. ISSUED. 


HEM AUKS. 


(blonel 
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Lt. Colom-1.. 

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GEORGE CROOK 
MELV1.V CLARKE 
K. B. ANDREWS 
VVM. G. .JoNKS 
HIRAM K. DUVALL 
MKI.VIX CLAUKE 
K. B A \DUK\VS 


Sept. 12, 1st 
7, isc 
17, " 
April 13, 181 
Sept. Hi, " 
July 30, ISC 
Sept. 7, lf. 
17, " 
May ;, ISC 
March s, is6 
July 28, is-i 

** ,$.- 

May 9, 186 
i>ec. 30, 
Feb. 3, 18 
AIU. 22, 1.- 


Sept. 12, 1S( 
Hi, IS. 
Oct. 13, 
April IS, is. 
Jan. 10, ISi 
Julv : , .}, IM 
S.-pt. ifi, is ( 
Oct. 13, " 
May y, ISC 
>Ian/h 8, isii 
July 30, l,st 
Sept. 10, isii 
Oct. 13, " 
May y, KSrt 
[)ec. 30, " 
Feb. 3, 18C. 
Sept. 13, IN; 
March 8, 1815 
)ec. 12, isii 
March S, l>d 
July r,, || 

ilarch 14, ISi; 

July 2"(, ISO 
Alii?. 30. lS(i 
Sept. 13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
" 13, " 
" 13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
" 13, " 
larch 2(i. 18C>2 
2(), " 
" L O, " 

i| i! 

" 13, " 
larch 30, 18C.3 
e^pt. y, II 

an. IS, ISfil 


Appointed Brigadier-General Sept. 7. ls2 
Killed September 17, I8fi2. 
Resigned April y, 1863. 
Killed September 111, 18C>3. 
Appointed Bvt. Brig. Gen. July 20, lsf>5. 
Promoted to Colonel September lii, !Sti2. 
Promoted to Colonel September 17, 1602. 
Promoted to Colonel. 
Mustered out. 
.Mustered out Avith regiment. 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Sept. 1, 1862 
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
I romoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Ltesigned November 2y, 1864. 
Mustered out. 
Transferred from 34th 0. V. I. 
designed February 2b, 1802. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
Promoted to Surgeon. 
Resigned May lit, 1S63. 
Promoted to Surgeon of new regiment. 
Resigned September 18, 1MI4. 
Mustered out with regiment. 
)id not accept. 
Mustered out. 
Mustered out. 
romoted to Major September 7, 1862. 
romoted to Major September 17, 1862. 
ie.signed November 26, 18C3. 
lesigned June 6, 1862. 
lesigned January 17, 1863. 
lesigned March 5, l,>62. 
romoted to Major, 
rumoted to Major, 
tesigned March 3, 1862. 
tcKigned March . r ), 1S62. 
)ischarged Apr. 2C., i;3; re-instated Aug. 3n, (>3. 
)jch;vrged Apr. 2ii, 63; rts-iustuted Aug. 30/63. 
lesignea October 3, 1862. 
lonorably discharged Xovembcr 2o, 1864. 
lustered out Xovember 4, 1864. 
littered out. 
led of wounds September 14, 1S61. 
onorably discharged on account wounds, 
fesigned Dect/uibei- y, Is64 
lusten-d out with rt ginieiiT-. 
lonoraldy discharged Xoveruber 25. 1S64. 
\ppointed Bvt. Maj. by Pros. March 13, 1366. 
It-signed. 
liMtorcd out with regiment, 
eclined promotion, 
{.esigned as 1st Lieutenant Dec. 1, 1864. 
Lustered out with regiment, 
lustered out with regiment. 
Lustered out with regiment. 
Mustered out with regiment, 
.esigned January 10, I86. r >. 
Ion. discharged as 2d Lieut. Jan. 23, 1S65. 
tesigned June 17, 1865. 
lustered out with regiment. 
Lustered out with regiment. 

esigned. 
romoted to Captain. 

romoted to Captain September 17, 18i>2. 
{esigned July 28, 1862. 
romoted to Captain. 
romoted to Captain, 
romoted to Captain. 
*romoted to Captain, 
ischarged July 21, 1862. 
csigned September 25, 1862. 
romoted to Captain, 
{esigned November 2 .l, 1862. 
romoted to Captain. 
romoted to Captain. 
romoted to Captain. 
enisiicd August ft, 1863. 
esigned February 22, I8fi3 
lesiiaied January 18, 1863. 
romoted to Captain. 
romoted to Captain, 
esitrned Xovember 18, 1603. 
, .signed August 27, 1S03. 
lustered out with regiment as K. Q. M. 


Hi It AM F. DUVAJ.L 

WM 11 (I ADNKV 


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Major 
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burgeon 


E. B. A.NDKKWS 

HIKAM F. DUVALL 
WM. 11. G. AONEY 
JRWETT PALJUEH 


WM. S. WILSON 
UENJ. .1. ilicKnu, Ju 
Ronr.uT X. BAKU 


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Chaplain 
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.). 11. WHITFOKD 
J. 11. WHITFOKD 


March 8, IS 
Auir. 23, 18 
March s, is 
Juiy 4, 
24, 
31arch 14, Is 
June 26, 
July IT), 18C, 
Aug. 30, l.si 
1, " 
14, " 
11, " 

41 22, " 
2i, 

" 3l| 
March 3, lsC>2 

run-) it, " 
Sept. 7, " 
17, " 
v)ct. 3, " 
Ian. 17, I8C.: , 
Aug. 3o, " 
" 30, " 
Xov. 26, " 
May y 1804 


COLIN MACKENZIE 


lOHN DlCKEttSON 

JAMES P. WELCH 
B. K. HOLCOMB; 
A. M. BEKKS 
.1. G. BI,AIU 

(i. W. C.ll.LIKK 

tlirain F. Duvall 
Win. II. G. A.luoy 
John Buckley . 
\V"iu. H. Dunliam 
Warren Ilollister 
L homas W. Moore 
Jewett Palmer 
Win. S. Wilson 
Wm. 8. Tajlcr 
.icvi M. Stophonson 
{euben L. Xye 
o.seph Kellev 


Vm. A. Wai Ion 
ames Stanley 
antes G. Barker 

Edward P. Henry 


fames C. Selby 
Vm. R. Ford 
oseph Kelley 

tenbeii L. Xve 
Benj. F. Stvahis 


Do. 

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onatlian X. Pattoii.... 
olm 1) Mitchell 


30, " 
" 30, " 

30, " 
" 30, " 
" 30, " 
" 30, " 
Ian. 20, 186/i 
20, " 
20 " 
March 8^ " 
" 8, " 
8, " 
8, " 
Inly 31, isi-;i 
^ug. 13, " 
14, " 
14, ^ 

22, " 
24, " 
24, " 
" 24, " 
24, " 
31, " 
31, " 
March 5, 1862 
5, " 
Juno fi, " 
S.^pt. 17, " 
July 2S, " 
M-pt. 2. ), " 
)ct. 3, " 
Sept. 1, " 
17, " 
Vov. 2J, " 
Dec. 1, " 


30, " 
" :j(), " 
" 30, " 
30, " 
" 30, " 
30, " 
an. 20, isc,5 
20, " 
20, " 
larch 8, " 
8, " 
" 8, " 
" 8, " 
uly 31, ISftl 
ept. 13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
13, " 
" 13, " 
13, " 
" 13, 
larch 20, Isc 2 
20, 
une 24, 
ct. 13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 
ec. 1, 
1, 
5, 


Do. 

= 

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homas 31. Turner 
liles A. Stacey 
esse Morrow 


Vallace S. Stanley 
Vugustus T. Ward 


Do 
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acob Keasoner 
saac C Philli is 


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let Lieutenant 
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